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 ARCHIVED TOPIC: Cyril Stinnett Videos


Please note this is an archived topic, so it is locked and unable to be replied to. You may, however, start a new topic and refer to this topic with a link: http://www.fiddlehangout.com/archive/2938

OTJunky - Posted - 04/03/2008:  19:58:30


The Missouri fiddler, Cyril Stinnett, has always been one of my fiddling idols.

quote:
From http://www.mustrad.org.uk/reviews/us_fiddl.htm review of Stinnett's recordings

Cyril Winfield Stinnett (1912-86) hailed from the northwest corner of Missouri near the Nebraska and Iowa state lines. He came from a long line of highly regarded fiddlers and, with the passing of his friends and rivals Bob Walters and Casey Jones, became the undisputed king of the Midwestern style - a title that has passed in turn to his disciple Charlie Walden. In later years his impeccable technique, built in metronome, and vast store of tunes earned him the nickname 'the fiddling computer'. He was recorded playing over 300 tunes and legend has it he knew as many again. He picked them up at dances and contests, off records and radio, out of books, and from friends like Walters and Jones. His technique was seriously impressive - evident here from the first few dramatic notes of Grey Eagle (sound clip). He played an ordinary strung fiddle left-handed ('over the bar') yet there's not a hint of awkwardness in his frequent excursions into third position. He was as happy in Bb or F as G or D, could pick up an out of tune fiddle and play in perfect pitch by finger compensation, and could turn in an immaculate performance when the accompanist was drunk, out of tune, out of time, or in the wrong key. He was an impressive contest fiddler with a string of prizes but never went professional and was always willing to share tunes, fiddling tricks and advice with whoever asked. Cyril's 'edge' came from total dedication to the instrument. "Play as much as you can" he said "you can't get too much practice". Though he managed the family farm up to his death and looked after his parents into old age, Charlie Walden recalls "he never worked particularly hard at anything other than playing the fiddle" and he never married, so avoiding the major distraction of raising a family. Let's leave the last word to Bluegrass maestro Kenny Baker - when asked the ultimate leading question 'who's the best fiddler' he allegedly replied "I don't know, but I don't know anybody can beat that old man up in northwest Missouri".
I've listened to a lot of his recordings, but never thought I'd get to see him play. But through the magic of YouTube..

One of these links popped up on another forum, and I found the other two on YouTube so I thought I'd share them here.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y26P...ture=related
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0ekn...ture=related
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0eknNSZ9OJE

You can also hear Stinnett play some tunes - Clyde Durst's Tune, Debuque's Hornpipe, Lantern in a Ditch, St. Anne's Reel, and Turkey in the Straw at this site...

http://fiddle.missouri.org/?page_id=6&person=1

Just to contribute to the Stinnett legend there's another story about him I read some time ago and can now only approximate. I hope someone knows the "accurate" version. It goes like this.

quote:
OTJunky's "best recollection" of Stinnett Story

A young fiddler walks up to Stinnett at a fiddle contest and says, "Mr. Stinnett, I'd really like to learn to play "The Orange Blossom Special". Can you show me how it's done.

So, Stinnett says, "Well Chubby Wise plays it likes this." Then Stinnett takes his fiddle and rips off a stellar version of OBS. The young fiddler is very, very impressed and says so. Then Stinnett says, "Thanks, now I'll show you how Benny Martin plays it.".

Stinnett again takes his fiddle and rips off another stellar, but different version of OBS. Now the young fiddler is awe struck.

Edited by - tiquose on 04/06/2008 11:54:06

tiquose - Posted - 04/03/2008:  20:36:49


OTJ, I'm just as thrilled as you to see those YouTube videos, so thanks for posting them here.

The guy must have had a deliciously dry sense of humor!

Cyril Stinnett is someone I need to know more about, so I'm going to get a copy of that CD, Three Fiddlers from the Show-Me State. It also has Lyman Enloe and Casey Jones.

Janet
"Curiosity killed the cat but satisfaction brought it back." -my grandmother, Bertha Morgan Nelson

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fiddlepLuker - Posted - 04/03/2008:  21:13:10


OTJ,

...ditto ....Thank You! I love this stuff!

wooliver - Posted - 04/04/2008:  08:46:59


Also, He won Grand Champion in Weiser Idaho in 1966.

In his understated way, when asked about his abilities, (I'll try to get it right) He said, "Sure, there's better fiddlers(than me), but they don't run around in bunches."



Webpage updated 3/5/08


Edited by - wooliver on 04/04/2008 08:57:35

DougD - Posted - 04/04/2008:  09:51:38


In case anyone missed it, wooliver has posted those in the video section here. I really enjoyed seeing them - I was familiar with a few fiddlers from that part of the country, but for some reason I'd never heard of Cyril Stinnet until I joined the FHO. I was wondering what all the fuss was about - now I know!

Glenn - Posted - 04/04/2008:  13:19:54


Just awesome. Thanks for the links.

fiddlebob - Posted - 04/04/2008:  14:06:25


Thanks for the great links!

fiddlebob

I never will be real good, but, I ain't as bad as I was!
www.soundclick.com/oldmanandafiddle

localboy - Posted - 04/04/2008:  22:24:36


Thanks, OTJ. The videos are awesome! They brought lots of questions to my mind, like why he never took the chin rest off or built one for the other side of the fiddle. Another question that bothered me was how was his fiddle set up, then I went back and watched the videos again and saw he was playing the fiddle strung for a right hander! I'll bet there is a good story behind how he learned to play that way!

Gary

allenadale - Posted - 04/05/2008:  10:24:11


Been off line for a week or so and just got on to find this treat. Great stuff.

woodwiz - Posted - 04/05/2008:  11:21:31


Thanks, Wooliver, for posting these, and thanks, OTJ, for posting the link. Stinnett's one of my fiddling heroes, and it's great to actually see him play. TUF, upside down fiddle, and all. It's interesting how little bow he used, and how quiet his left hand is. Also how crooked his bow is.

I love a lot of his tunes. I lucked into three cassettes with about ninety of his tunes on them, so I have years of work in front of me. If I can, I'll try to get permission to post some of them here.

Michael R

www.kcstrings.com
"Creating world class instruments in the heart of America."

"Thank you for the wonderful violin you made. I've used it on every show I've played since I've got it." John Hartford

OTJunky - Posted - 04/05/2008:  11:44:13


quote:
Originally posted by woodwiz

I love a lot of his tunes. I lucked into three cassettes with about ninety of his tunes on them, so I have years of work in front of me. If I can, I'll try to get permission to post some of them here.

Wonder if anybody can help me identify these three tunes?

I think #8 is "Dance Around Molly" without the 3rd part that McMahan played - is that right?

Anybody know the names of the other two?

--OTJ
"I can barely fiddle on four strings. Why would I want five?"


Edited by - OTJunky on 04/05/2008 11:46:11

tiquose - Posted - 04/05/2008:  20:54:13


quote:
Originally posted by woodwiz Also how crooked his bow is.


I noticed that, too! According to what I've been taught he shouldn't be getting a good tone, but does he ever! I thought maybe I was just imagining things until I read your post, woodwiz.

Janet
"Curiosity killed the cat but satisfaction brought it back." -my grandmother, Bertha Morgan Nelson

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FHO FAQ

fiddlepogo - Posted - 04/06/2008:  00:32:44


I just started listening/watching one of his tunes.

Am I imagining things, or is he an up-bow fiddler?
The general motions seem very close to the reverse of mine.

I wonder if he's not doing a reverse Sawshuffle!

Actually I don't know- up-bow fiddling disguises everything to me,
and that's not a really good angle, and he <is> making <really>
short strokes.

Excellent fiddler, though!

Michael

http://www.ezfolk.com/audio/bands/1088
for mp3s, blog, and "Michael's Old Time Fiddle & Banjo Hour" (hifi & lofi audio streams)

Two roads diverged in a wood, and I—
I took the one less traveled by,
And that has made all the difference
-Robert Frost

Groucho Marx - Posted - 04/06/2008:  02:54:10


quote:
Wonder if anybody can help me identify these three tunes?

I think #8 is "Dance Around Molly" without the 3rd part that McMahan played - is that right?

Anybody know the names of the other two?

--OTJ
"I can barely fiddle on four strings. Why would I want five?"



Thanks for posting these. I'm also wondering about the tune names, esp. #7.

-Clifford

"That, which thy fathers bequeathed thee, earn anew, if thou wilt possess it."
-Goethe, Faust

wooliver - Posted - 04/07/2008:  09:03:53


Cyril seems to be an Enigma, if not a contradiction. I can't positively answer anything.
That may not and probably isn't his fiddle, in the video. It could be Red Lamb's. Cyril lasted until 1989, but for much of the later years he never had a playable fiddle in the house. Like Roy Wooliver, he'd play on yours if you gave it to him. Cyril's reputed to be able to play an out of tune fiddle and compensate perfectly as well.
I purpously left the titles off many of the selections, unless i could absolutely identify the tune by ear or by the conversation. I know of one, not included, was a tune that his Dad played and he never knew the name. So it's possible as well that some tunes didn't have more than a title like "that good tune in A." So if you think have a title for a selection, let us all know. This too helps to build our Oldtime fiddle history.



Webpage updated 3/5/08

woodwiz - Posted - 04/07/2008:  09:11:06


quote:
Originally posted by fiddlepogo

I just started listening/watching one of his tunes.

Am I imagining things, or is he an up-bow fiddler?
The general motions seem very close to the reverse of mine.




One thing about this style is that with all the notes, it's really easy to get off your bowing, especially when you do variations, so it's best to be able to play a tune "forwards and backwards". If you can play it both ways, then the wheels won't fall off if you get a hiccup in your bowing.

Same goes for bluegrass - If you're off on a break and find yourself in the tulies, it's really good to be able to play "both ways".

Michael R

www.kcstrings.com
"Creating world class instruments in the heart of America."

"Thank you for the wonderful violin you made. I've used it on every show I've played since I've got it." John Hartford


Edited by - woodwiz on 04/07/2008 10:42:57

OTJunky - Posted - 04/07/2008:  09:41:15


quote:
Originally posted by Groucho Marx

Thanks for posting these. I'm also wondering about the tune names, esp. #7.

Something tells me a new tune's about to enter the repertoire with the title, "Stinnett's #7"....

--OTJ
"I can barely fiddle on four strings. Why would I want five?"

wooliver - Posted - 04/07/2008:  10:25:06


BTW Just added Cyril playing RTA.
That'll be it for awhile.

Webpage updated 3/5/08

coelhoe - Posted - 04/07/2008:  11:40:19


Just by accident, yesterday I was reading the long interview with Kenny Baker in "Bluegrass Unlimited" from February, 1991. And the interviewer asks him that question as to who, in his (Baker's) opinion, is the best fiddler. Baker lists a number of fiddlers but never Mr. Stinnet.

Baker's list: Howdy Forrester (Baker's favorite), Clayton McMIchen, ("Fiddlin'") Arthur Smith, Curly Fox, Mack McGarr, Dale Potter, and Paul Warren.

Dennis


"Not being able to play very well is a good substitute for not having good taste." -Eddie Adcock

OTJunky - Posted - 04/07/2008:  12:26:28


Who's Mac McGarr - and what kind of fiddling did he do?

--OTJ
"I can barely fiddle on four strings. Why would I want five?"

DougD - Posted - 04/07/2008:  12:30:36


http://books.google.com/books?id=m_...xEvB3Q&hl=en

You know, I like Cyril Stinnett's playing, but watching him actually do it makes me kind of seasick!


Edited by - DougD on 04/07/2008 12:34:50

OTJunky - Posted - 04/07/2008:  14:10:58


quote:
Originally posted by coelhoe

Just by accident, yesterday I was reading the long interview with Kenny Baker in "Bluegrass Unlimited" from February, 1991. And the interviewer asks him that question as to who, in his (Baker's) opinion, is the best fiddler. Baker lists a number of fiddlers but never Mr. Stinnet.

Baker's list: Howdy Forrester (Baker's favorite), Clayton McMIchen, ("Fiddlin'") Arthur Smith, Curly Fox, Mack McGarr, Dale Potter, and Paul Warren.

Sounds like Baker might've dodged the question and named, instead, the fiddlers who had the most influence on his playing.

I suppose the question, "Who's the best fiddler?", is ultimately unanswerable. There are too many styles and too many subjective factors.

Even among Missouri fiddlers, Stinnett was often referred to as a "hornpipe" fiddler - meaning that he preferred clean noting and melodic phrasing to double stops and complex rhythmic bowings. And a lot of Missouri fiddlers preferred their own fiddling to his.

There's a quote on Charlie Walden's web page from a Missouri fiddler who's about to face Stinnett in a contest and says, "I ain't afraid of no hornpipe fiddler" - though he probably went on to lose to Stinnett.

I think Cyril Stinnett's claim to fame is simply that he pretty much devoted his life to fiddling and to fiddle tunes.

His style permitted him to play a lot of them - supposedly something between 300 and 600. And he played them all - many in difficult keys - cleanly, at tempo, with good intonation and good rhythm. It's hard to think of many fiddlers that were better at just this narrow definition of fiddling. The recordings he made in his prime document a substantially better fiddler than the one you're seeing on these video tapes.

But I doubt that Stinnett's playing would've had a big influence on Kenny Baker's fiddling. I don't think Stinnett ever backed up singers, played in a band, or played much - if at all - for dancers. There are many things you can do with a fiddle that Stinnett didn't do with his.

But I do think that if Stinnett - in his prime - were to've faced any of those fiddlers Baker mentioned at Weiser he might have beaten any of'em. And I wouldn't be surprised if Baker thought so too. It would be interesting to know where www.mustrad.org.uk got the Baker quote.

--OTJ
"I can barely fiddle on four strings. Why would I want five?"


Edited by - OTJunky on 04/07/2008 14:31:44

Groucho Marx - Posted - 04/07/2008:  16:08:56


quote:
Originally posted by OTJunky

quote:
Originally posted by Groucho Marx

Thanks for posting these. I'm also wondering about the tune names, esp. #7.

Something tells me a new tune's about to enter the repertoire with the title, "Stinnett's #7"....

--OTJ
"I can barely fiddle on four strings. Why would I want five?"



Seems like the best we can hope for so far. By the way, does anybody know where the #1, #7, and #8 designations come from? Are there five more tunes lurking out there?

-Clifford

"That, which thy fathers bequeathed thee, earn anew, if thou wilt possess it."
-Goethe, Faust

wooliver - Posted - 04/07/2008:  16:27:15


Clifford -
The numbers were arived at so i could keep track of each tune as i seperated it from the total session. #1 is the first tune on the session video. #7 is the seventh tune from the session, etc.

Truth be told, i was using a shareware/freeware that i just picked up and was learning to use it on-the-fly. I would prefer an editor where you mark the begining and end of what you want to save and then pause and save and go to the next. The first software i found wasn't that easy. I need to go back and mince apart more tunes but other duties are pressing. I feel like im hogging bandwidth. I know there's many Youtubers with over twenty videos uploaded, but it takes time to upload each.
I'll see what i can get done this week. It is only Monday.



Webpage updated 4/2/08


Edited by - wooliver on 04/07/2008 16:29:31

Groucho Marx - Posted - 04/07/2008:  20:42:59


quote:
Originally posted by wooliver

Clifford -
The numbers were arived at so i could keep track of each tune as i seperated it from the total session. #1 is the first tune on the session video. #7 is the seventh tune from the session, etc.

Truth be told, i was using a shareware/freeware that i just picked up and was learning to use it on-the-fly. I would prefer an editor where you mark the begining and end of what you want to save and then pause and save and go to the next. The first software i found wasn't that easy. I need to go back and mince apart more tunes but other duties are pressing. I feel like im hogging bandwidth. I know there's many Youtubers with over twenty videos uploaded, but it takes time to upload each.
I'll see what i can get done this week. It is only Monday.



Webpage updated 4/2/08




Oh, I see. So there are more tunes, but you haven't had time to edit/post them. Got it!

Maybe this was already explained and I missed it, but...

How/ where did you come across the video? Is it something you taped? Or a home video that you acquired somehow?

Just trying to piece this puzzle together.

And thanks again for posting the vids!

-Clifford

"That, which thy fathers bequeathed thee, earn anew, if thou wilt possess it."
-Goethe, Faust

coelhoe - Posted - 04/08/2008:  11:15:32


In the BU article, Baker goes on at some length to explain why he admired those specific fiddlers: tone, double stops (Curly Fox), and so forth. I have no idea who Mack McGarr is. But Baker was clear in that he thought Howdy Forrester was the best of the lot. Stinnet died in 1986 and Baker's interview was in 1990.

I saw Stinnet play at Weiser in 1966, the year he won the open division, and his style (in the contest, anyway) was indistinguishable from the other contestants. I remember that he played "Billy In The Lowground," as one of his tunes, and that his version impressed me. Obviously impressed the judges, too.

Dennis


"Not being able to play very well is a good substitute for not having good taste." -Eddie Adcock


Edited by - coelhoe on 04/08/2008 14:04:34

M-D - Posted - 04/08/2008:  11:45:17


quote:
Originally posted by OTJunky
[There's a quote on Charlie Walden's web page from a Missouri fiddler who's about to face Stinnett in a contest and says, "I ain't afraid of no hornpipe fiddler" - though he probably went on to lose to Stinnett.



I believe that quote came from Pete McMahan, in which case who won would have depended upon the judges on any given day.

_________________________________________________________________

M-D

Old-Time, All the Time

Music is found in the space between the notes -- in the silence between the chords. Get your spaces right, and you've got it. ~ Albert Greenfield




mjs4x6 - Posted - 04/08/2008:  15:33:17


#1 is "Five Miles From Town." I don't know a name for #7. #8 sounds like "Dance Around Molly."

Groucho Marx - Posted - 04/08/2008:  16:08:49


quote:
Originally posted by mjs4x6

#1 is "Five Miles From Town." I don't know a name for #7. #8 sounds like "Dance Around Molly."





MJS- You're right! Did Cyril Stinnett call it "Five Miles Out of Town?"

-Clifford

"That, which thy fathers bequeathed thee, earn anew, if thou wilt possess it."
-Goethe, Faust

mjs4x6 - Posted - 04/08/2008:  16:28:39


He might have called it Five Miles Out of Town as opposed to Five Miles From Town. I don't remember.

timberhill - Posted - 04/12/2008:  02:48:19


Hi friends. You would have to ask Charlie Walden or Dwight Lamb about that, "I ain't afraid of no hornpipe fiddler" quote, but it surely wasn't Pete McMahan who said that. Pete was a hornpipe fiddler and known as such by other fiddlers. He and Cyril and Jake Hockemeyer and Gene Wells and Taylor McBaine pretty much flipped coins over who won at contests for several years in Missouri in the later 1960s and into the 1970s -- all of whom were Little Dixie and north Missouri style "hornpipe fiddlers." And hey Dennis, that is so true, Cyril's "Billy in the Low Ground" was awesome at Weiser in the 1960s and remains an awsome version of that big tune (I've been trying to play it like Cyril since I first heard him play it a contest in Paris MO back around 1970 myself).
Cheers, Howard Marshall

lrhamp - Posted - 04/12/2008:  06:49:56


Timberhill (eeerrrr Howard)? Would you happen to know what tunes Cyril played in the contest at Weiser? I've always wondered about that.

lrhamp

OTJunky - Posted - 04/12/2008:  07:31:43


Here're the quotes from Charlie Walden

quote:
From Charlie Walden

"I ain't scared of no hornpipe fiddler."

---Taylor on Cyril
I assume that quote's from Taylor McBain...

Here's another
quote:
From Charlie Walden

"I used to be able to play it. I don't know. That's what happens when you get old. Some things get stiff and others go limp."

--- Jake Hockemeyer when asked to play Woodchopper's

--OTJ
"I can barely fiddle on four strings. Why would I want five?"


Edited by - OTJunky on 04/13/2008 11:53:16

M-D - Posted - 04/13/2008:  12:52:19


Thanks for the correction. Apparently who won still depended upon who was judging that day . . . or, the flip of a coin.

_________________________________________________________________

M-D

Old-Time, All the Time

Music is found in the space between the notes -- in the silence between the chords. Get your spaces right, and you've got it. ~ Albert Greenfield




coelhoe - Posted - 04/13/2008:  14:12:00


I don't know if others have this experience, but sometimes at a contest, one player will step up to the mike and you just know from the first time through a tune that there is your winner. That happened to me at Weiser with Cyril Stinnet in '66 with his "Billy In Low Ground," and the next year ('67) with Loyd Wanzer with "Pacific Slope," the following year ('68) with Herman Johnson and "Grey Eagle."

A piece of music in performance that is so strong and so perfect that it just imprints forever on your memory without you even realizing it.

Dennis





"Not being able to play very well is a good substitute for not having good taste." -Eddie Adcock

wooliver - Posted - 04/14/2008:  09:02:33


Dennis, i've been in a few contests where the best fiddler won. It makes me feel good to get beat by a real good fiddler, rather than a judge(s). I like it when they're so head and shoulder above the rest that it can't be denied.

That must've been something to see, Weiser back in those days. I heard a story last week about '66. Cyril never said much, but wondered what to play for the contest minutes prior. They decided to run through Billy in the Low Ground, for practice. From this account, 200 people went silent when they heard him "warming up."

i go to contests for the jamming. The hard-nosed competitors are off by themselves, while the rest of us consider the contest an inconvenience that tares us away from the jam for ten minutes.

Webpage updated 4/2/08

coelhoe - Posted - 04/14/2008:  10:12:17


I have tried without success to recall why it was that Stinnet seemed so different from the other fiddlers onstage at Weiser in '66. I don't know if he played sitting down (which is what I recall) which would have been quite unusual, or if he played wearing overalls, which was also unusual since most of the male contestants wore close the their "Sunday best" to perform.

The main thing I recall about Weiser in 1966 is how the Chamber of Commerce sponsors really didn't have a grasp on what they were doing with the contest. Here were some of the most extraordinary traditional musicians in North America, and the town treated event rather like a Shriner's convention (nothing against the Shriners, a group which really knows how to enjoy themselves).

All during the contest rounds in the high school auditorium (which had a typically mediocre sound system), there were male members of the Chamber who dressed in drag, i.e. in exaggerated women's outfits, and cruised the audience sitting in men's laps, kissing bald guys on the head, and generally making pests of themselves while the musicians were playing on stage. In 1967, I was sitting in the front row to the right of the center aisle with a small Sony recorder and these guys knocked over my recorder and scattered my notes all across the floor, and thought it was hilarious. These were not kids, but adults, and I expect that alcohol had something to do with their behavior. It was very unpleasant. When I asked the Chamber office about it, I was told "Oh, they're just having fun."

In retrospect, I wish I had thought to camp out with the other players. I lived less than an hour away and so we just went home at night.

Dennis


"Not being able to play very well is a good substitute for not having good taste." -Eddie Adcock


Edited by - coelhoe on 04/14/2008 10:26:25

Groucho Marx - Posted - 04/14/2008:  22:47:12


Wooliver: still curious. What are the origins of the videos you posted?

-Clifford

"That which thy fathers bequeathed thee, earn anew, if thou wilt possess it."
-Goethe, Faust

wooliver - Posted - 04/15/2008:  08:39:20


Sorry Groucho,
These tunes are from a single video tape that was recorded by Dwight "Red" Lamb. When i called Red for permission, he told me he got an early video tape machine to record family events. But one of the first things he did was to go down to Cyril's and record him for posterity. Red made a few VHS copies to which i digitized one into a DVD. I'm using a DVD cutter software to make Youtube size bits of video. When i saw the J. P. Fraley and Eck Robertson video on Youtube, i knew i had to get busy and get a few of these tunes out there to represent the Mo. style that Red, Cyril, and Bob Walters play over here. Gene Goforth and the Stonekings are well represented on CDs but they too should be represented as well. Maybe by myself and others getting some archival stuff out there it will prompt somebody to do what i did. A rizing tide lifts all boats. So an up and coming fiddler can see all the possibilities that lay before him or her, they need to not only see and hear Marc O'Connor, but also John Hartford, Cleo Persinger, Benny Martin, Doug Kershaw, Bruce Molsky, Lymon Enloe, Everybody.

Webpage updated 4/2/08

VivianW - Posted - 04/22/2008:  15:14:04


Some of the tunes that Cyril Stinnett played at Weiser in 1966 were: Sally Goodin, Woodchopper’s Reel, Rosebud Hornpipe, Dance Around Molly, Jack Danielson’s Reel, Fiddler’s Dream, Pacific Slope, Bennett Reel, Five Miles Out of Town, Canary Waltz, Sleepy Joe. In those days, the third tune of a contest round could be another hoedown if you wanted to.

Kenny Baker must have meant "Mack Magaha" rather than "McGarr." He was a fabulous fiddler who played in Don Reno and Red Smiley's bluegrass band for years, and later in Porter Wagoner's band on Porter's TV show. There are some videos of his playing on YouTube -- search for his name, and then try searching for Don Reno. I posted one of them on the videos here on Fiddle Hangout.


Vivian T. Williams


Edited by - VivianW on 04/22/2008 20:08:36

OTJunky - Posted - 04/22/2008:  22:02:05


Thanks for putting up that video clip of Mack Magaha.

I'd seen it on YouTube before.

In fact, I probably saw him on the Porter Waggoner show when I was a kid. But I had no idea who he was.

--OTJ
"I can barely fiddle on four strings. Why would I want five?"

DougD - Posted - 04/22/2008:  23:24:43


Vivian, I had that same thought, but if you check the link I posted earlier in this thread, there was a fiddler named Mack McGarr. He was from Kentucky, and perhaps Kenny Baker heard him early on.
BTW, I was over at Clint Howard's house tonight practicing for a little show next Sunday at Merlefest, and he told me a story of getting you to play "Orange Blossom Special" while staying at your house so Fred Price could see how it was supposed to go. "She's a hell of a fiddler" I think is what he said!

Thanks for posting that video though, and also to you and Phil for recording that great "Old Tmey Concert" album - one of my all time favorites.


Edited by - DougD on 04/22/2008 23:27:18

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