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 ARCHIVED TOPIC: chord diagrams


Please note this is an archived topic, so it is locked and unable to be replied to. You may, however, start a new topic and refer to this topic with a link: http://www.fiddlehangout.com/archive/57088

woodswalker - Posted - 09/07/2022:  08:21:13


Hi! I'm just learning Bluegrass so I am trying to learn the Double Stops. I'm not a Music score reader. I'd like to memorize the chord shapes, so I'm looking for a simple diagram, probly like what a mandolin player would use. The G shapes, E minor shape, etc. Anyone know of a link, or should I run over to the Mandolin hangout?

DougD - Posted - 09/07/2022:  08:44:13


Check out this thread: fiddlehangout.com/topic/57040

A mandolin chord book will help, but in practice you can only play two strings at a time on a violin.

RobBob - Posted - 09/07/2022:  09:43:28


Look for the book, A Fiddler's Guide to Moveable Shapes. It can be found here:



fiddlershop.com/products/a-fid...d-edition

screecher - Posted - 09/07/2022:  09:50:26


If you google "pickloser's guide to doublestop" a free pdf will come up that was very helpful for me when I started playing mandolin.

woodswalker - Posted - 09/07/2022:  11:17:06


Thanks for your links!
I think I'll just get a piece of paper & draw them. Generic shapes on a grid, like with guitar.
I grew up on guitar & banjo tab. Not music scores.

Brian Wood - Posted - 09/07/2022:  13:48:05


It's pretty easy to type "mandolin chords" in a search engine, then select "images" for results. Find what you want to save or print.


Edited by - Brian Wood on 09/07/2022 13:48:26

farmerjones - Posted - 09/07/2022:  15:07:55


Mel Bay Publishing, Fiddle Chord Charts

mmuussiiccaall - Posted - 09/07/2022:  15:21:57


This chart from an earlier post shows the six ways to play double-stops over any major chord ( just flat the 3rds for a minor chord.) The fingerboard diagram on the right using the interval numbers in the middle shows how to play the harmonized scale in all keys and modes in every key. Just like the rest of music theory, it's all simple math.





hangoutstorage.com/fiddlehango...82022.pdf


Edited by - mmuussiiccaall on 09/07/2022 15:22:31

woodswalker - Posted - 09/07/2022:  15:45:00


quote:

Originally posted by mmuussiiccaall

This chart from an earlier post shows the six ways to play double-stops over any major chord ( just flat the 3rds for a minor chord.) The fingerboard diagram on the right using the interval numbers in the middle shows how to play the harmonized scale in all keys and modes in every key. Just like the rest of music theory, it's all simple math.





hangoutstorage.com/fiddlehango...82022.pdf






THANK YOU. This is what I wanted. 

Swing - Posted - 09/07/2022:  16:20:58


Ya know, if you learn what notes make a chord, then it is fairly easy to pick two of the three notes and make the double stop on the fiddle...knowing the three notes gives you the opportunity to create an easy chord inversion... no diagrams needed...

Play Happy

Swing

woodswalker - Posted - 09/07/2022:  16:29:43


quote:

Originally posted by Swing

Ya know, if you learn what notes make a chord, then it is fairly easy to pick two of the three notes and make the double stop on the fiddle...knowing the three notes gives you the opportunity to create an easy chord inversion... no diagrams needed...



Play Happy



Swing






I know chords on pianos & guitars, and I have learned to play tunes on the fiddle, but chords on fiddle is a whole new thing.That is to say, I know easy stuff like G and C. Well I went to a jam where they wer e playing in B and F... :0

buckhenry - Posted - 09/07/2022:  19:16:36


quote:

Originally posted by woodswalker



I think I'll just get a piece of paper & draw them. 






Here's the diagrams I drew, which shows the possible double-stop shapes, but like Swing said you may need to understand basic chord structure...



EDIT: I forgot to correct the Dim4th mistake, it's actually a Dim5th, but the shape is important..... 


Edited by - buckhenry on 09/07/2022 19:21:49



 

woodswalker - Posted - 09/07/2022:  19:28:01


Great job!! I've downloaded this. I understand basics like 5ths, Root, Octave. I used to play bass & could visualize the bass chord structures. Now it's just a matter of me internalizing Fiddle structures. Thanks!

Earworm - Posted - 09/08/2022:  05:41:30


And grab that 4th finger unison now and then - like when you have an open A (or any string) at the end of a phrase, or other select moments, slide your pinky finger up to the the unison A on the D string. It's subtle, but can add a sweet little "bite."

woodswalker - Posted - 09/08/2022:  05:53:09


physically I haven't been able to get that 4th finger to obey like I wish I could. Also, moving up the fingerboard there are a lot of sour notes. I suppose it just takes more practice?


Edited by - woodswalker on 09/08/2022 05:53:58

Swing - Posted - 09/08/2022:  05:56:43


Yep, sour notes take a lot of practice!

Play Happy

Swing

Earworm - Posted - 09/09/2022:  05:25:33


Well, regarding the 4th finger unison - this is a learned skill. Yes, it will take practice. Yes, you can do it. :)

woodswalker - Posted - 09/09/2022:  06:24:34


My 4th finger is lazy & useless. When I try to engage it, the first finger jumps up in the air. I guess it's cause I can't stretch that far.

Lonesome Fiddler - Posted - 09/09/2022:  12:22:25


Keeping your left fingers straight but comfortable, gently stretch your left finger pinkie away from the left ring finger every every day for a week or so. Use the index and middle finger from the other hand to do the stretching. Before long, you'll get there.

Earworm - Posted - 09/11/2022:  10:46:55


For a long time I had "one tune" that I would use the 4th finger unison for. I learned to use it there, but somehow still thought it was a "neat trick" for that one tune. So maybe that's one way "in" to beginning to get comfortable with it. Some tunes just demand something special, so you try a little harder to jump the hurdle, and eventually it gets more comfortable.


Edited by - Earworm on 09/11/2022 10:57:09

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