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May 13, 2024 - 4:38:40 AM
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962 posts since 9/3/2022

So, since I spotted my first violin in an old antique store a couple years ago now, I constantly look and seek out for another. Every time we're out and spot a store, I've remained hopeful. Welp, yesterday I was in luck. I came across this beauty that needs just a little professional TLC but, I think it will make a nice fiddle to bring back from the dead. Strad copy made in Czech-Slovokia is what the label says. Sound post is still in place...Not to mention the case is actually functional and latches very tight. Very solid violin.






May 13, 2024 - 4:57:22 AM
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Quincy

Belgium

917 posts since 1/16/2021

Good luck with it Erockin!

May 13, 2024 - 5:40:04 AM
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RichJ

USA

989 posts since 8/6/2013

Nice find there Erockin. I have several that look more or less like that one. All found at flea markets or so called "antique shops". Most for under (sometimes well under) $200. Some required regluing of a partially separated front plate, but all turned out to be great players - naturally some better than others.

May 13, 2024 - 5:50:13 AM

Erockin

USA

962 posts since 9/3/2022

quote:
Originally posted by RichJ

Nice find there Erockin. I have several that look more or less like that one. All found at flea markets or so called "antique shops". Most for under (sometimes well under) $200. Some required regluing of a partially separated front plate, but all turned out to be great players - naturally some better than others.


Yeah, it has one little spot that needs glued...then cleaned up. It won't be worth much but, if it plays and sounds nice, it'll feel great to give it some life.

May 13, 2024 - 7:30:04 AM
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284 posts since 11/26/2013

Good luck with her! I used to go to antique auctions with the ex-wife, and picked up a number of violins at these. Usually for like $50 or so. Fixed them up and either sold or gave them away. The bows were the surprising part of these acquisitions. Most were cheap crap, but a few turned out to be really worth something.

May 13, 2024 - 7:40:45 AM

Erockin

USA

962 posts since 9/3/2022

quote:
Originally posted by wrench13

Good luck with her! I used to go to antique auctions with the ex-wife, and picked up a number of violins at these. Usually for like $50 or so. Fixed them up and either sold or gave them away. The bows were the surprising part of these acquisitions. Most were cheap crap, but a few turned out to be really worth something.


First I was surprised about the case..they usually fall apart when you open them..lol...and then by the feeling and weight, the violin is solid. Even if it wasn't, I still would have paid what I did for it. In case any of you gurus read this, what household product would be safest to clean this up with?

May 13, 2024 - 8:06:34 AM
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RichJ

USA

989 posts since 8/6/2013

.....what household product would be safest to clean this up with?

In my opinion, and it's only an opinion mind you, the safest and best thing is to start with a cotton ball or soft cloth dampened (not soaked!) with plain water. Work slowly, a small patch at a time, to get the grunge off. Keep changing to a fresh piece of dampened cotton or clean cloth. Amazing how well this works if you keep at it. The worse stuff you can encounter is old, dirty and dried rosin dust in the bridge area, but I have found even this can be removed with the method I am suggesting if you keep at it and work slowly. This method may be slow but safer than any of the new fancy cleaning products which could easily damage what ever finish is left. BTW the finish on yours looks pretty good and it doesn't look too grungy compared to some I have picked up over the years.

Edited by - RichJ on 05/13/2024 08:07:23

May 13, 2024 - 8:12:26 AM
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DougD

USA

11987 posts since 12/2/2007

I agree with Richj. There are no "household products" suitable for cleaning violins. And go easy on the water - "dampened (not soaked)."

May 13, 2024 - 8:48:53 AM

Erockin

USA

962 posts since 9/3/2022

Thanks, guys...I hope to do a before and after.

May 13, 2024 - 9:45:26 AM
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2540 posts since 4/6/2014

Don't forget the bow ..Might be a goodun. good luck

May 13, 2024 - 10:41:09 AM

Erockin

USA

962 posts since 9/3/2022

quote:
Originally posted by pete_fiddle

Don't forget the bow ..Might be a goodun. good luck


I'll need to look into that! It's def a wood bow. I'll inspect. 

May 14, 2024 - 6:33:39 AM

Erockin

USA

962 posts since 9/3/2022

quote:
Originally posted by pete_fiddle

Don't forget the bow ..Might be a goodun. good luck


The bow is locked up tight.... :/ 

May 14, 2024 - 7:06:57 AM
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6514 posts since 9/26/2008

quote:
Originally posted by Erockin
quote:
Originally posted by pete_fiddle

Don't forget the bow ..Might be a goodun. good luck


The bow is locked up tight.... :/ 


You can't turn the screw? That can't be dealt with, let Google or YouTube show you how laugh

May 14, 2024 - 7:23:41 AM
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6 posts since 8/21/2009

Curiosity question, I noticed the fine tuner. Can someone related when they first came into use? That is, how old a violin might have one.

May 14, 2024 - 7:38:49 AM
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284 posts since 11/26/2013

Fine tuners can be added to any violin regardless of age, so having one is no indication of age.

May 14, 2024 - 7:42:38 AM
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Erockin

USA

962 posts since 9/3/2022

quote:
Originally posted by wrench13

Fine tuners can be added to any violin regardless of age, so having one is no indication of age.


I'm always like, if I see 1 tuner, that player is probably pretty good...lol. 

May 14, 2024 - 8:54:18 AM
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DougD

USA

11987 posts since 12/2/2007

learn2turn - What wrench13 said is certainly true, but when they first came into use is an interesting question. They are helpful for steel strings, and the E string was the first to change, because gut E strings were fragile and unreliable. That's why you see just one on some instruments - the E is steel and the rest gut, or later synthetic. So I would have expected they came into use at the same time as steel E strings, but maybe not.
FWIW - I have copies of catalog pages from Sears catalogs c.1900, and a C. Bruno catalog from a little earlier. Both show instruments as well as fittings and accessories, including sets of steel strings, but neither one lists fine tuners, although both show geared machine tuners like Tommy Jarrell used.

Edited by - DougD on 05/14/2024 09:06:21

May 14, 2024 - 9:15:01 AM
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DougD

USA

11987 posts since 12/2/2007

PS - I just Googled "violin fine tuner history," which led me here: benningviolins.com/accessories...ne-tuners

May 14, 2024 - 12:27:18 PM
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2514 posts since 12/11/2008

quote:
Originally posted by DougD

PS - I just Googled "violin fine tuner history," which led me here: benningviolins.com/accessories...ne-tuners


Benning! Loved that joint! Lived nearby. Bought my best fiddle there, and always took my instruments there if something was amiss.

Edited by - Lonesome Fiddler on 05/14/2024 12:27:56

May 14, 2024 - 4:04:37 PM
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doryman

USA

602 posts since 2/10/2020

Nice find!  

Edited by - doryman on 05/14/2024 16:05:49

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