Banjo Hangout Logo
Banjo Hangout Logo

Premier Sponsors

45
Fiddle Lovers Online


Nov 9, 2023 - 7:05:06 AM
4 posts since 11/9/2023

I am attempting to build my first violin and being an engineer with a machine shop wonder about using my granite surface plate with bluing to check flatness of top and bottom plates and rib assembly.
Any comments?

Nov 9, 2023 - 8:15:17 AM
like this

Swing

USA

2343 posts since 6/26/2007

Use the tools that you are comfortable with... most people feel that violin making requires a large amount of contemplating your navel.... in reality it is just wood working... some of the finest sounding violins in the world are less that perfect...

Play Happy

Swing

Nov 9, 2023 - 10:27:43 AM
like this

1543 posts since 3/1/2020

Granite is a good reference material as long as it is cut well. Kitchen and bath stone suppliers are generally happy to let you have offcuts. I got a nice long skinny piece of marble that works perfectly for cello fingerboards.

Some people use plates of glass. Just check for flatness before using—if it’s poured, it might be uneven. A good friend of mine keeps a thick glass plate on a side bench at all times to use in checking flatness. 

To be sure you’ve got a properly flat surface, invest in a good straightedge. It never hurts to check.

Edited by - The Violin Beautiful on 11/09/2023 10:30:19

Nov 10, 2023 - 4:58:52 AM

4 posts since 11/9/2023

My surface plate is designed to check the flatness of metal. I was wondering if the bluing I use for that would permanently stain the wood.

Nov 13, 2023 - 7:48:41 AM

291 posts since 11/26/2013

Metal working blueing solutions are for metal! I would never use Dyk-em or similar on wood, you'll wind up with a blue fiddle!

Nov 13, 2023 - 7:57:23 AM

DougD

USA

12005 posts since 12/2/2007
Online Now

I suspect the bluing would stain the wood, but maybe not where it would be noticeable or detrimental. Still, I think chalk, or maybe carbon paper, would be a better choice.

Nov 13, 2023 - 10:58:57 AM

1543 posts since 3/1/2020

Are you thinking of using the bluing to mark high spots? If so, I’d recommend something else for that. Flatness is easy enough to determine with a flat surface or straightedge. Marking is not a necessity, although you may find that you prefer it. I use my flat surfaces only to lay things against to look for gaps or rocking and to look for a feeling of light suction when they’re properly flat. I don’t recommend abrading a flat object with anything because it can compromise flatness over time.

Nov 13, 2023 - 2:17:57 PM

4 posts since 11/9/2023

quote:
Originally posted by DougD

I suspect the bluing would stain the wood, but maybe not where it would be noticeable or detrimental. Still, I think chalk, or maybe carbon paper, would be a better choice.


I like the suggestion of using carbon paper - I'll give it a try.

Nov 19, 2023 - 5:54:36 AM

102 posts since 4/11/2022

quote:
Originally posted by rosnekcaj

My surface plate is designed to check the flatness of metal. I was wondering if the bluing I use for that would permanently stain the wood.


I know what you are talking about I think you mean "dikem". It probably is not spelled right but close enough. I have no idea on whether it will harm the wood but I doubt seriously you could get it out of the wood once you put it on there. Regardless it is overkill. I have a small granite plate, 12x9, that I use mostly to check flatness of tools but I can go corner to corner and get most of a plate half. If you have a 2 foot straight edge you can determine if the plate assembly is flat, including you can see if it is dished, which you can't do on a plate. 

Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Privacy Consent
Copyright 2024 Fiddle Hangout. All Rights Reserved.





Hangout Network Help

View All Topics  |  View Categories

0.109375