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Nov 17, 2022 - 8:37:42 AM
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1551 posts since 7/26/2015
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What do you consider "longbow" fiddling? I've noticed the definition seems to vary considerably, some people thinking of it as using more slurs vs. others thinking of it as using more of the bow per stroke regardless of whether slurs are used. In my chats with John Engle, he has said he thinks of longbowing as when you play more than four notes on a bow stroke.

Nov 17, 2022 - 9:06:27 AM
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10716 posts since 3/19/2009
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Yes, I think of a lot of notes/bow stroke, and a LOT of long bow strokes, not just an occasional event.

Nov 17, 2022 - 10:35:15 AM
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14110 posts since 9/23/2009

I think it means the opposite of short bowing...lol...kidding you, but yeah I guess any bowing discussion or opinions will vary considerably. What do you consider long-bowing?

I guess I have no official definition but to me it would be more of a smooth style, non rhythmically driven but smoother style and I guess basically that would involve more notes per bow stroke, as opposed to styles where rhythms are thrown in there by way of a lot more choppy kind of bow licks, shuffles, etc. I wouldn't want to have to count the notes per bow stroke to make up my mind, but rather just the sounds being produced  by the way the fiddler is handling the bow.  What's your own idea? What are you hoping to hear?

Edited by - groundhogpeggy on 11/17/2022 10:36:24

Nov 17, 2022 - 11:41:34 AM
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970 posts since 3/1/2020

I think of “long bow” as playing a lot of notes or for a long time on each bow stroke. If the player was using a lot of the bow for each individual note, I’d call that “whole bow” playing.

Edited by - The Violin Beautiful on 11/17/2022 11:42:14

Nov 17, 2022 - 4:18:43 PM
Players Union Member

boxbow

USA

2745 posts since 2/3/2011

quote:
Originally posted by The Violin Beautiful

I think of “long bow” as playing a lot of notes or for a long time on each bow stroke. If the player was using a lot of the bow for each individual note, I’d call that “whole bow” playing.


I'd have lumped them all together and called it "long bow."  I think you have it, though.

Nov 17, 2022 - 6:10:02 PM

2869 posts since 10/22/2007

The late, Ed Haley seems to me to be a good example of a long bow fiddler.

Nov 18, 2022 - 5:37:50 PM

bacfire

USA

23 posts since 3/26/2008

Here's a good example and a great tune:

youtube.com/watch?v=DK3KFTmr0DQ

Nov 19, 2022 - 8:27:31 PM
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RobBob

USA

2897 posts since 6/26/2007

Arthur Smith, Ralph Blizard, Kenny Baker are long bow fiddlers.

Nov 19, 2022 - 9:32:50 PM

3217 posts since 9/13/2009

I don't think of it as counting how many notes. But perhaps more of along the lines of mostly changing bow direction on just the beat or bar... not exclusively but more that direction. As GHP mentioned, less saw stroke or shuffle; creates a smoother feel. 

That said, I notice some folks that at quick glance looks like that long bow, but not really. Esp non-symmetrical; seems like a lot more going up than down? 

Dec 2, 2022 - 9:10:02 PM
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1551 posts since 7/26/2015
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Something I haven't seen mentioned here that can also be part of the equation is using slurs on string crossings when most folks would use separate bowstrokes. Also, Vassar Clements jumps out at me as being a longbower.

Edited by - soppinthegravy on 12/02/2022 21:12:34

Dec 7, 2022 - 4:19:34 AM
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10716 posts since 3/19/2009
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quote:
Originally posted by soppinthegravy

Something I haven't seen mentioned here that can also be part of the equation is using slurs on string crossings when most folks would use separate bowstrokes. Also, Vassar Clements jumps out at me as being a longbower.


I MAKE myself slur across strings... Helps me because I may be called a pattern fiddler (love them) and I challenge myself to keep a pattern going even if string crossing is required on a tune.

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