%>
Banjo Hangout Logo
Banjo Hangout Logo

Premier Sponsors

22
Fiddle Lovers Online


Oct 2, 2022 - 6:37:38 PM
like this
668 posts since 6/11/2019

We call a meal that was totally produced on our place a 100-percenter.

It's pretty hard to do that unless you just eat some lettuce, tomatoes and garlic. But, we come close sometimes. For Sunday supper today we came close:

Jalepeno poppers from the garden wrapped in bacon from our pigs.

Meatloaf using our grass-fed beef and our chickens eggs.

Mashed taters grown from our garden.

Fried green beans from our garden.

Apple pie--apples from our trees.

Disgestif--bourbon that I stilled from our corn, and aged using white oak I cut from our timber.

Granted, we never really get up to 100 percent cause we don't grow the wheat for pie crusts, nor the olive oil or seasonings. But it's a fun thing to strive for.

Anyone else enjoy this frontiersman hobby? I know there's gardener's here, so I'm sure several get close to 100% already

Oct 2, 2022 - 7:20:18 PM
like this

2817 posts since 10/22/2007
Online Now

It's easy for me at breakfast, cuz we have the hens. Homegrown peppers,onions, and tators. But alas Columbian coffee. In another thread I said I pick my battles. I don't milk cows any more. As far as that goes, I don't feed (or doctor) cattle anymore either. But I usually get half of whatever goes to the locker from my brother.

Edited by - farmerjones on 10/02/2022 19:21:22

Oct 2, 2022 - 8:01:25 PM
like this

13888 posts since 9/23/2009

Well subsistence farming is quite a chore...you done good, Scott! I grew up eating squirrel, rabbits, turtles, frogs, catfish, sunfish, home-grown cows, home-grown fowl of various types, home-grown eggs, home-grown corn, strawberries, blackberries, tomatoes, beans, eggplant, pumpkin, poke greens, walnuts, hickory nuts and just being nuts myself...lol. But now we live on a tiny rocky shady hillside, but I've figured out in these past 3 decades here how to make the little postage stamp into an edible lawn, so to speak...but mainly it's just beans, beans, beans, plus tomatoes, greens of various types, squashes, okra...I think that's about it...oh horseradish, blackberries, strawberries...we have grapes and paw paws, but the raccoons take them all...we had apple and peach trees but the sewer deparment came and bulldozed them to death when they put sewer lines in our neighborhood...smells better but the new apple trees I replaced them with just really don't make apples. We had goats here for a while and milked and ate some of the goat meat too...but I really don't like goat milk or meat and we ended up selling the goats...took up too much space and since theres no way to grow hay here we were just always buying and hauling hay...lol. We had chickens too...but I became allergic to eggs so I just don't really wanna have chickens if I can't eat the eggs...anyway...that's about as subsistence as we can get...most of our meat is factory farmed. I tried being vegan for a few years but as much as I would not like to participate in our food system...I found that I am much better off eating meat...so...it's factory farmed or nothin...lol. That's it. We can't grow much here, but I feel like it'd be hard to starve because our rattlesnake beans just never stop...every day I get between a half or full gallon just from the few vines we have growing up the porch...they are still full of blossoms too...the freezer is packed with tons of beans...lol.

Oct 2, 2022 - 10:53:18 PM
like this

2000 posts since 4/6/2014

We somtimes get to around an 80/90 percenter. We're having Muntjac today. Probably with wild mushrooms and crab apple jelly spuds and green beans. So i suppose it's about a 60/70 percenter we didn't grow the spuds this year.... But it will be cooked on the Rayburn (cookstove) with our logs.

Oct 3, 2022 - 6:24:40 AM
like this

6063 posts since 8/7/2009

Proud for you Scott!!! That's been a lifelong dream.

On occasion we can get close to 100% serving salads and veggie plates.

But we only have a few acres in a "residential" neighborhood. Our HOA does not allow raising livestock, and the "rules" for gardening limit where we can grow. Living "here" is a love / hate relationship. But it is where we are indecision, and - at our age - probably where we will stay.smiley Thankfully content.




 

Oct 3, 2022 - 7:24:55 AM
like this

668 posts since 6/11/2019

quote:
Originally posted by pete_fiddle

We somtimes get to around an 80/90 percenter. We're having Muntjac today. Probably with wild mushrooms and crab apple jelly spuds and green beans. So i suppose it's about a 60/70 percenter we didn't grow the spuds this year.... But it will be cooked on the Rayburn (cookstove) with our logs.


I had to look up Muntjac--it's a deer.  I love venison--lean, but tasty.

Regarding the wood cookstove, does it heat up the kitchen a lot?  In the American South, that would be unbearable in summer.

Oct 3, 2022 - 7:52:10 AM
like this

795 posts since 8/10/2017

All we have in our garden is avocados and limes. Neighbors have lemons and passionfruit. Friends have pears, apples, grapes and more avocados. We live in the land of fruit.

Oct 3, 2022 - 9:23:52 AM
like this

2000 posts since 4/6/2014

quote:
Originally posted by Flat_the_3rd_n7th
quote:
Originally posted by pete_fiddle

We somtimes get to around an 80/90 percenter. We're having Muntjac today. Probably with wild mushrooms and crab apple jelly spuds and green beans. So i suppose it's about a 60/70 percenter we didn't grow the spuds this year.... But it will be cooked on the Rayburn (cookstove) with our logs.


I had to look up Muntjac--it's a deer.  I love venison--lean, but tasty.

Regarding the wood cookstove, does it heat up the kitchen a lot?  In the American South, that would be unbearable in summer.


I can't believe how tender that muntjac leg was, The leg was as tender as the saddle, with a silky texture to the meat. My wife cooked it with Rowan berry jelly, thyme, Wild mushrooms and streaky bacon layed over it with roast spuds and broccoli. Muntjac is not Strong and Gamey like Roe Deer or Red Deer Venison . It has a very subtle taste a bit like a cross between very fine pork loin and spring Lamb. I would say you get about 10-12Kg of stunning meat from a single Muntjac

The Rayburn heats everything. Hot water, Radiators, oven, hotplate and kitchen. 16000 btu/hr, or 4.7 Kw boiler (Max), and a couple of Kw or so room heating. uses around 3 or 4 cords of logs a winter. Just started lighting it to save on electric. We use electric in summer as we have solar panels ( about 4Kw while the sun shines). i just got rid of the oil burner and swapped back to logs a couple of years ago couldn't stand the stink and soot any more ...Just in time...i don't think i would have a rayburn in a hot climate though, It has only just got cool enough here (UK) to light it again.

Oct 3, 2022 - 10:59:18 AM
like this

doryman

USA

372 posts since 2/10/2020

Hey Scott, we do the same kind of thing in the summer months and always have a fun time with it. Typically, it's an assortment of vegetables from our garden and dungeness crab that we easily catch out of the bay, within walking distance of our house. To drink, plum wine I make from my trees and some from my neighbor's tree, who helps me with the endeavor. For dessert...whatever berries we have that are ripe at the time. Some of the spices we use are NOT from our own efforts, most basically, the salt!

Oct 3, 2022 - 7:10:15 PM

668 posts since 6/11/2019

quote:
Originally posted by doryman

Hey Scott, we do the same kind of thing in the summer months and always have a fun time with it. Typically, it's an assortment of vegetables from our garden and dungeness crab that we easily catch out of the bay, within walking distance of our house. To drink, plum wine I make from my trees and some from my neighbor's tree, who helps me with the endeavor. For dessert...whatever berries we have that are ripe at the time. Some of the spices we use are NOT from our own efforts, most basically, the salt!


Wow, eating DIY dungeness crab beats anything we could do in the Ozarks.  Sounds delicious

The plum wine, too:  I enjoy making wine, but it's been mostly from frozen concentrate.  The times I've tried using actual fruit I never could rack it enough to clarify it.  Always cloudy, with bad presentation.  But what the heck, the only thing anybody around here cares about is the taste and the ABV!  Prost!

Oct 3, 2022 - 7:22:10 PM
likes this

2817 posts since 10/22/2007
Online Now

Reminds me DW says it's time to harvest honey too!
She's getting overworked right now, putting the garden to bed.
We've got a greenhouse about 50% completed. Should be done in a few days.
Bless her, she's always wanted one.

Oct 3, 2022 - 9:07:57 PM
likes this

doryman

USA

372 posts since 2/10/2020

quote:
Originally posted by Flat_the_3rd_n7th
quote:
Originally posted by doryman

Hey Scott, we do the same kind of thing in the summer months and always have a fun time with it. Typically, it's an assortment of vegetables from our garden and dungeness crab that we easily catch out of the bay, within walking distance of our house. To drink, plum wine I make from my trees and some from my neighbor's tree, who helps me with the endeavor. For dessert...whatever berries we have that are ripe at the time. Some of the spices we use are NOT from our own efforts, most basically, the salt!


Wow, eating DIY dungeness crab beats anything we could do in the Ozarks.  Sounds delicious

The plum wine, too:  I enjoy making wine, but it's been mostly from frozen concentrate.  The times I've tried using actual fruit I never could rack it enough to clarify it.  Always cloudy, with bad presentation.  But what the heck, the only thing anybody around here cares about is the taste and the ABV!  Prost!


I don't know, I was thinking that your still had me beat by a country mile.  If you ever find yourself in the PNW, I'll take you crabbing, we'll have feast followed by a jam session with my crew...but you have to bring some of the moonshine!

Oct 4, 2022 - 6:05:16 AM
like this

6063 posts since 8/7/2009

quote:
Originally posted by farmerjones

Reminds me DW says it's time to harvest honey too!
She's getting overworked right now, putting the garden to bed.
We've got a greenhouse about 50% completed. Should be done in a few days.
Bless her, she's always wanted one.


I'm planting for fall and winter. We'll see how well that works out.

I just finished our 10 x 18 fenced-in dog pin. wink

Next... is converting our gazebo into a greenhouse. Starting on that this week. Hope to be finished before Thanksgiving.

And, I'm getting stuff together to install a rainwater catchment system (2 IBC totes for now).


Oct 4, 2022 - 6:08:32 AM

Erock77

USA

140 posts since 9/3/2022

Tony, love that shed you have for your Husqvarna! I have a 48" deck and used to keep it in something similar at our old place.
Now it's in a new garage and would much rather have something like you have there.

Oct 4, 2022 - 6:38:21 AM

13888 posts since 9/23/2009

Looks good, Tony!

I had two or three good years of hydroponic gardening inside during the winter...I did it the cheap way...the kratky way...very cheap...just use makeshift containers you've got laying around or canning jars and mix up hydroponic water and we got a lot of greens, mainly...we bought high tech shop lights and put them up on the shelving and it worked out great. Then...the bugs came. We've got those Asian stink bugs that come in the houses in the winter...they found us...they found my plants, they laid their eggs...then some kinda fly got into the works and we had so many bugs to kill like several times every day...I just took all the hyrdo stuff outside that year...of course it all died and I haven't had the nerve to try that again since...lol. Can't deal with a house full of crawling gigantic Asian stink bugs (and their stench to boot) and swarming little flies going around all over the place.

I wish I had enough flat space to think about a greenhouse here...I guess we could try for small cold frames...I was gonna start a fall garden of cabbage and kale but didn't get to that yet...still dealing with daily incoming from what little gardening I do have around here...lol.

Our tiny yard really works best for stuff like chickens or goats...but I don't like goat or goat products and I'm apparently allergic to chicken eggs...so...that works about as well as finding people to play music with...lol...just me alone on my shady hillside growin what'll grow and playin by myself on my ol' banjo...lol...I had to put it that way because of the rhyme...lol.

Hide these ads: join the Players Union!

Hangout Network Help

View All Topics  |  View Categories

0.1875