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Aug 24, 2022 - 8:12:13 AM

Creole

USA

56 posts since 4/19/2022

So I read that Helicore Strings are thinner and tend to sink into the nut end of the neck easier than a thicker string. Anyone have any thoughts or experience on this? TY

Aug 24, 2022 - 8:23:03 AM
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2291 posts since 8/27/2008

quote:
Originally posted by Creole

So I read that Helicore Strings are thinner and tend to sink into the nut end of the neck easier than a thicker string. Anyone have any thoughts or experience on this? TY


No, I doubt that.

Aug 24, 2022 - 8:56:50 AM

RobBob

USA

2881 posts since 6/26/2007

I used to use them but they never did that. I don't like how they interact with the bow. Perhaps if I was a better fiddler that wouldn't be a problem.

Aug 24, 2022 - 9:08:36 AM

DougD

USA

10882 posts since 12/2/2007

They are kind of "slinky" and might be easier to press down, but they don't "sink into" the neck. All strings will wear grooves into a fingerboard or fretboard eventually, but it takes a long time.
My small experience is with the medium gauge Helicores.

Aug 24, 2022 - 10:56:56 AM
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911 posts since 3/1/2020

Steel core strings have a smaller diameter and tend to be at a higher tension than synthetics, so they exert more pressure on a string groove in a smaller contact point. However, the difference isn’t all that great, and the strings are unlikely to damage the instrument itself if it’s in good shape.

Steel strings do cut into the bridge a lot faster, though. This is why it’s standard practice to install a parchment under the E string.

Aug 24, 2022 - 11:14:53 AM
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5746 posts since 7/1/2007

quote:
Originally posted by Creole

So I read that Helicore Strings are thinner and tend to sink into the nut end of the neck easier than a thicker string. Anyone have any thoughts or experience on this? TY


I've never had to repair a nut because of string wear, that I can remember. Ever. I've shimmed or replaced nuts for various reasons, mainly overzealous filing. IMO, just more BS from people trying to sound smart. Strings do wear and cut into bridges, and they cut into cheap bridges faster. Parchment under the E is a must. 

BTW, some synthetic string sets have a higher tension overall than some steel sets. Steel's modulus of elasticity makes them feel "tighter", or stiffer.

Aug 24, 2022 - 11:43:24 AM
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DougD

USA

10882 posts since 12/2/2007

Rich and Michael - Are you talking about the fingerboard itself or just the nut? Creole was really asking about the "nut end of the neck,"which I took to mean the fingerboard, although its hard to tell exactly what he meant by that.

Aug 24, 2022 - 12:33:31 PM

Creole

USA

56 posts since 4/19/2022

quote:
Originally posted by KCFiddles
quote:
Originally posted by Creole

So I read that Helicore Strings are thinner and tend to sink into the nut end of the neck easier than a thicker string. Anyone have any thoughts or experience on this? TY


I've never had to repair a nut because of string wear, that I can remember. Ever. I've shimmed or replaced nuts for various reasons, mainly overzealous filing. IMO, just more BS from people trying to sound smart. Strings do wear and cut into bridges, and they cut into cheap bridges faster. Parchment under the E is a must. 

BTW, some synthetic string sets have a higher tension overall than some steel sets. Steel's modulus of elasticity makes them feel "tighter", or stiffer.

Awesome info Michael and thanks. Learning from the experienced is why I asked.
Aug 24, 2022 - 12:35:20 PM

Creole

USA

56 posts since 4/19/2022

quote:
Originally posted by DougD

Rich and Michael - Are you talking about the fingerboard itself or just the nut? Creole was really asking about the "nut end of the neck,"which I took to mean the fingerboard, although its hard to tell exactly what he meant by that.


Doug,

 

Mostly just the nut...didn't think the finger board would be an issue with pressure.  The bridge, yea I know those need the tube on the high E and still take a beating across the other strings. 

Aug 24, 2022 - 12:36:50 PM

Creole

USA

56 posts since 4/19/2022

quote:
Originally posted by The Violin Beautiful

Steel core strings have a smaller diameter and tend to be at a higher tension than synthetics, so they exert more pressure on a string groove in a smaller contact point. However, the difference isn’t all that great, and the strings are unlikely to damage the instrument itself if it’s in good shape.

Steel strings do cut into the bridge a lot faster, though. This is why it’s standard practice to install a parchment under the E string.

Niiice  Thank you...
Aug 24, 2022 - 12:39:01 PM

DougD

USA

10882 posts since 12/2/2007

OK, thanks. The E string needs more than just the little tube. You'll notice that both Rich and Michael recommended parchment on the bridge under the E string.

Edited by - DougD on 08/24/2022 12:46:02

Aug 24, 2022 - 12:41:32 PM

Creole

USA

56 posts since 4/19/2022

quote:
Originally posted by RobBob

I used to use them but they never did that. I don't like how they interact with the bow. Perhaps if I was a better fiddler that wouldn't be a problem.


We all could be better at some point I am sure..  lol   Answering from experience...thanks.  I am playing on Tonicas and miss the slightly higher pitch I get from the steel cores but these TP's are really a pleasure to bow across.  Some what forgiving even for a scratcher like me. 

Aug 24, 2022 - 12:45:32 PM

5746 posts since 7/1/2007

Just a side note: That customer of mine who plays 18, 2-hour shows a week plus rehearsals plus side gigs? I was checking his fiddle over a few weeks ago when I was down in Branson. He's had it a year now, playing solid core chrome-wound steel strings. No visible fingerboard wear. It's a good quality fingerboard, but not cast iron. Good demonstration that fingerboard wear is a reflection of the player, IMHO.

Aug 24, 2022 - 11:56:31 PM
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911 posts since 3/1/2020

The strings wear both the fingerboard and the nut over time. Players with a light touch and/or dry hands will often get a longer working life out of their fingerboards before they need to be planed again, whereas those who sweat heavily or have acidic sweat tend to wear their fingerboards more quickly. It has absolutely nothing to do with playing ability.

As the strings are stopped against the fingerboard over and over, they slowly wear away the material. Eventually grooves develop and intonation becomes problematic. If you look down the fingerboard with a raking light, you’ll be able to see just where the fingered notes have been on a violin that’s been played heavily. Every once in a while the fingerboard needs to be planed to smooth everything out. Eventually the board gets thin enough that it needs to be replaced.

While it’s true that in many cases nuts are improperly made to begin with, it’s also true that the grooves become deeper over time with use. This is easily observed on instruments where the grooves have worn down to the point that the strings begin to wear into the fingerboard itself. Good quality ebony will last longer than poor quality or other woods painted black.

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