Banjo Hangout Logo
Banjo Hangout Logo

Premier Sponsors

13
Fiddle Lovers Online


Page:  First Page   1  2

Oct 15, 2022 - 9:49 PM

Quincy

Belgium

519 posts since 1/16/2021

quote:
Originally posted by rcc

I should add - I like the Vision Titanium Solos because I change tunings a lot.

That rules out strings that have a wonderful sound for fiddling that are terrible when you change tunings. Obligatos are perhaps the poster-child for this. They have a wonderful sound that many fiddle players like (check out the Quinn Violins description and you'll see what I mean) but they are perhaps the very worst string for someone who changes tunings a lot.

Iirc, they took 15 minutes to stabilize when changing tunings.

So not something that I can use even though I loved how they sounded. But if you only use GDAE tuning, they're worth thinking about.


Since i have switched to chromcors i haven't tried another tuning, afraid they would change/ break.

Thursday I have a meeting with others, so I cannot permit broken strings now. Maybe I should order another set, just in case.

Oct 16, 2022 - 6:06:44 AM
like this
Players Union Member

Earworm

USA

423 posts since 1/30/2018

Chromcors are very forgiving. You can definitely change the tuning. Just be careful that when you're tightening the string, you're not getting your fine tuners too close to the wood of the fiddle (I have 4 fine tuners - I can't remember you do too). I understand that's a really common bit damage that can happen to a fiddle, and this is exactly how it would occur. If you feel like the fine tuners are straining the tension too much (or the screw is getting too close the the wood), adjust the main peg a bit and work the fine tuners from that new position.

I would always recommend a back-up set of strings. I carry an old set of strings in my case (each of my cases), always. I guess they could be new strings, but I don't see any point in putting more age than needed on brand new strings by just having them on standby for months. In an emergency, an old string should do the job.

Oct 16, 2022 - 6:25:06 AM
like this
Players Union Member

Earworm

USA

423 posts since 1/30/2018

Just an add-on to my comment - I suppose I say some things that are obvious sometimes, mainly because I don't know what's obvious to others. If you don't need all my words (ever) just skip em.

Oct 16, 2022 - 7:22 AM
likes this

Quincy

Belgium

519 posts since 1/16/2021

Ok thanks, I need a spare set. Old ones I have now are helicores.

Oct 16, 2022 - 8:10:34 AM
likes this

DougD

USA

10964 posts since 12/2/2007

Earworm - All very good advice, IMHO. Not neccessarily obvious either. I've noticed that some things that seem obvious to me are not only not obvious, but sometimes incomprehensible to others.

Oct 16, 2022 - 9:09:48 AM
like this

rcc

USA

505 posts since 8/5/2008

Most strings (and I've tried a *lot* of strings - admittedly most of them not for more than 15 minutes) are forgiving when it comes to changing tuning. So having a string break on you when you change tuning is very much the exception, not the rule, especially if you change your strings when they go dead. I've been in many many workshops and sessions where we changed tunings and maybe once has someone broken a string.

The best way to avoid breaking a string is to keep the slots in the nut and bridge well lubricated. Use a #2 pencil (or a mechanical pencil) and gently run the tip of the pencil back and forth in the slot so the graphite in the pencil lead rubs into the groove.  You want a good amount in the groove to help keep the string moving smoothly.  I keep a mechanical pencil in my case and I do this to every slot in the nut and bridge every time I change strings. (I also apply peg dope to my pegs as well to keep them turning smoothly.)

The other tip is if you're tuning a string to a higher pitch, loosen it a little first. That helps avoid the situation where something (either the slot in the nut or bridge) is binding the string so part of the string stretches instead of the whole thing and that part then breaks under the stress. Loosening it will hopefully get everything moving.

So whenever I tune a string up, I first turn the peg the other way a little (maybe 1/8-1/4 turn) and then I turn it in the direction to tighten it.

That said, I usually carry two sets of spares with me. One set in case a string breaks. The second set in case a string breaks when I put it on or one of the strings is bad and simply unravels on me when I put it on.  (And yes, I did have an A string unravel on me once when I was putting it on.)  I also label which is the "next" set and which is the backup to the next set so I don't accidentally keep one set of strings for years.

Edited by - rcc on 10/16/2022 09:13:48

Oct 16, 2022 - 9:28:39 AM
likes this

rcc

USA

505 posts since 8/5/2008

As an aside, re-reading this post made me remember the Obligato retuning experience / experiment better.

If I recall correctly, I think it took closer to 30 minutes for the Obligatos to settle in when retuning, not 15. They were by far the absolute *worst* string I've ever tried for changing tunings which is why the experience has stuck in my head for so many years. In some ways, I'm still amazed that one string would be so much worse than the average synthetic string (which typically about 5 minutes to settle in).

That said, I love their sound and I think they were pretty responsive, too. A lovely string if you're going to stay in GDAE tuning and a horrible string if you're someone who changes tuning on a regular basis.

Oct 16, 2022 - 5:21:12 PM

Quincy

Belgium

519 posts since 1/16/2021

That makes it more clear RCC, certainly! I forgot the pencil by the way , it was my first time changing strings, next time I'll pay attention to it.

Oct 16, 2022 - 5:26:46 PM

6180 posts since 8/7/2009

Love this post and the responses! Thanks for starting it Anja.

I the last fiddle I bought has Tomastik Dominate strings (I think). I bought this fiddle back after trading it for a guitar I wanted. When I traded it, it had Helicore Heavy gauge strings. I liked the way it sounded. At the time I traded - I had bought a few more fiddles... (yeah, I know - FAS). This was the newest/earliest built fiddle, so I thought I could do without this one. BUT, it was the first fiddle I owned. A few years ago it came up for sale, and I decided that I wanted it back (sentimental hack).

Point is... when I got it back - it wasn't exactly what I was expecting. I don't remember it sounding this way - not as good as I remembered. Perhaps I romanticized the sound in my head - or maybe the strings are just not right for the fiddle.

Anyway, I'm taking it to a luthier to find out what might be possible to get back what I remember. 

I pretty much use Prims and Jargar strings nowadays for all the other fiddles. Both seem to be a little more mellow and last longer than Helicores.

2 cents.

Oct 16, 2022 - 5:41:07 PM
likes this

2146 posts since 12/11/2008

Quincy -- I always use Chromcors on the fiddle I keep cross-tuned. Has one of them ever broken on me? Maybe once in the near 20 years I've played. In other words, I'd stop worrying. And yes, who knows why Chromcors aren't as respected as some other brands? I just love 'em.

Edited by - Lonesome Fiddler on 10/16/2022 17:42:01

Oct 16, 2022 - 5:49:32 PM

Quincy

Belgium

519 posts since 1/16/2021

quote:
Originally posted by Lonesome Fiddler

Quincy -- I always use Chromcors on the fiddle I keep cross-tuned. Has one of them ever broken on me? Maybe once in the near 20 years I've played. In other words, I'd stop worrying. And yes, who knows why Chromcors aren't as respected as some other brands? I just love 'em.


Thanks! So far I like the chromcors best and it was about time I tried something different.  I must admit the only times I broke a string  was when I was turning the wrong peg, always lost them this way.

Page:  First Page   1  2

Hangout Network Help

View All Topics  |  View Categories

0.1721191