Banjo Hangout Logo
Banjo Hangout Logo

Premier Sponsors

65
Fiddle Lovers Online


Jun 9, 2022 - 11:10:36 AM
like this
309 posts since 6/26/2007

Here's another original I composed:

https://youtu.be/9Sqi1c_YQtA

Jun 9, 2022 - 12:02:56 PM
likes this

596 posts since 6/11/2019

Boy, howdy do I like that 'urn.

Are you doing all those instruments? I'm afraid I'm ignorant on all the latest recording gadgetry.

Jun 9, 2022 - 12:55:44 PM
like this

wilford

USA

309 posts since 6/26/2007

Thank You, Scott. Yes, I'm playing all the instruments. Actually, the baritone and tenor saxes and the trombone are virtual instruments, and the upright bass is, too. The computer plays the music that I compose on Studio One 5 Professional digital audio workstation. The stage piano is my 61 key midi-keyboard (I majored in composition and minored in piano in college). The banjo is my Mullins 5-string and the fiddle is an old 1834 that's been in the family for an awful long time along with my favorite Tourte bow.

I use an Audio Technica at2035 microphone and a Presonus Studio 26c interface and Windows 10.
Thanks, again. :)

Edited by - wilford on 06/09/2022 12:56:59

Jun 9, 2022 - 2:58:55 PM

13451 posts since 9/23/2009

That was cool! My favorite composer. I love the horns and the whole thing...very nice composition and played nicely too. What was the tuning you were trying out on that awesome banjo part?

Jun 9, 2022 - 3:31:28 PM
likes this

wilford

USA

309 posts since 6/26/2007

quote:
Originally posted by groundhogpeggy

That was cool! My favorite composer. I love the horns and the whole thing...very nice composition and played nicely too. What was the tuning you were trying out on that awesome banjo part?


Thanks, Peggy. 

I guess the easiest way to get to this tuning - which I'm now calling "Bb7 tuning" is to tune the 4th string to a low Bb, then drop the 3rd to an F, then the second to an Ab, and miraculously leave the 1st string where it is at D. Then take the capo and place it on the 4th fret and tune the 5th string to a high A. This creates a D7 tuning consisting of 5th to 1st: A D A D F#. 

I've tried my best to make sense of how to get to this tuning. Hope it's clear enuff. lol

Jun 9, 2022 - 7:04:10 PM
likes this

13451 posts since 9/23/2009

Thanks, Fred...I think I sorta get it...good explanation! The easiest part for me was when you said it creates a D7...have to try that one of these days.

Jun 9, 2022 - 10:27:03 PM
likes this

Quincy

Belgium

411 posts since 1/16/2021

That was amazing! I love it <3 Must feel special to play on a fiddle that!

Jun 10, 2022 - 5:38:11 AM
likes this

wilford

USA

309 posts since 6/26/2007

Thank You, Quincy. I love my old fiddle. :)

Jun 10, 2022 - 6:05:45 AM

13451 posts since 9/23/2009

Were you in standard tuning with the fiddle on that, Fred?

Jun 10, 2022 - 7:46:39 AM
likes this

wilford

USA

309 posts since 6/26/2007

Yes, Peggy. I was in standard tuning and played in the key of D. The baritone sax was in 5 sharps, the tenor in 4 sharps and the trombone and everything else 2 sharps. :)

Hide these ads: join the Players Union!
Jun 10, 2022 - 4:14:51 PM
likes this

13451 posts since 9/23/2009

Well you did it all just right, sounds like to me!

Jun 12, 2022 - 12:23 PM
likes this

wilford

USA

309 posts since 6/26/2007

quote:
Originally posted by groundhogpeggy

Well you did it all just right, sounds like to me!


Thanks, Peggy. In the interest of playing something besides strictly Bluegrass, I'm presently working on an old French Canadian fiddle tune called "Old French". Some folks call it "Rambler's Hornpipe" but It's not a real "hornpipe" in my best guess, so I just call it "Old French". 

My understanding of  hornpipes probably varies some from other's. I like to think of them as employing predominantly a dotted quarter followed by a sixteenth as a common practice of bowing. But, it's also that the last half of Part B usually is the same as the last half of Part A in a hornpipe. This piece here is more like a "Reel"and really played like a reel by most of my Canadian friends. All of this of course is just my opinion. :) But, anyway, it's coming along nicely and I'll post it pretty soon. :)

Jun 12, 2022 - 6:09:59 PM
likes this

13451 posts since 9/23/2009

Can't wait to hear it, Fred.

Jun 12, 2022 - 6:17:16 PM
likes this

2697 posts since 10/22/2007

Dang Fred! You've got a new subscriber.

Jun 12, 2022 - 7:33:09 PM

wilford

USA

309 posts since 6/26/2007

quote:
Originally posted by farmerjones

Dang Fred! You've got a new subscriber.


Thank You very much. :)

Jun 13, 2022 - 2:38:47 PM
likes this

wilford

USA

309 posts since 6/26/2007

quote:
Originally posted by groundhogpeggy

Can't wait to hear it, Fred.


Here it is: https://youtu.be/rCZTSBg4EgE

Jun 13, 2022 - 2:56:13 PM
likes this

13451 posts since 9/23/2009

Very creative and unique...I love the Grassy, Canadian sound!

Jun 13, 2022 - 3:07:04 PM

wilford

USA

309 posts since 6/26/2007

I got this info from the "Session" site online:

The melody was a popular vehicle for contra dancing in the 1970’s, when it seemed to surface simultaneously in the New England repertoire and on the West Coast. Popular belief has it that the "Old French" title derived from a remark by an old Vermont fiddler who, when asked its title, said it was "just an old French tune". The reel was known in Canada prior to the "folk revival" that fed American contra dancing, and was in Maritime fiddler Don Messer’s "Down-East" repertoire (as "Rambler’s Hornpipe," probably the source for many American "revival" musicians). The original provenance is in Québécois repertoire, where it was recorded in 1929 under the title "Reel de St-Tite" on a recording by Sotère Mongrain and Ida Mongrain (violin with piano accompaniment). Ottawa Valley fiddlers know it as "Rambler’s Hornpipe" or "Little Old Man," while Cape Breton fiddlers call it "The Old French Reel".

Hide these ads: join the Players Union!

Hangout Network Help

View All Topics  |  View Categories

0.1560059