Banjo Hangout Logo
Banjo Hangout Logo

Premier Sponsors

100
Fiddle Lovers Online


Apr 21, 2022 - 3:11:18 PM
like this
3055 posts since 9/13/2009

From a previous topic about some recording techniques about adding FX, delay, reverb, double tracking, stereo widening to a plain dry recording. Tough to get mix/master to sound good on all devices (that why they have expert services). 

For comparison


Edited by - alaskafiddler on 04/21/2022 15:17:17

Apr 21, 2022 - 3:31:31 PM
likes this

2237 posts since 8/27/2008

I listened to both. While I understand the added functions, and sometimes do recording myself using them, I tend to like a drier sound. It's important to avoid listener fatigue for one thing. Making things too wet can be harder to listen to. Thanks for posting both. Very useful.

Apr 21, 2022 - 4:08:31 PM

3055 posts since 9/13/2009

Thanks, valid points, agree there is some clean directness with the drier I like. However it is also noticeable thinner, smaller, lacks roomy air, and punch. 

I was trying demonstrate some simple plug-ins, techniques mentioned in other post... so I did go a little over, pushing to point where obvious but still listenable. Those plug-ins/techniques are fairly easy, to add something; it doesn't have to be that much. But agree can be too much, esp reverb... besides fatigue, starts making the EQ in mix a little muddy (usually too much mids)... making instruments, esp lead, stand out less.

Granted original wasn't the best setup for recording, IIRC, cheap fiddle, single LDC mic fairly close... to compensate for poor room. So just trying to restore that, agree easy to go too far. There is something I like about aspects of the fuller, though maybe not that degree. Ideally somewhere in between. To learn how to tweak it just right, can be time consuming (which I didn't spend)

Ideally would have started over, set up room/mic better in the first place laugh... the earlier in the chain you get good, the easier it is deal with.

edit... one aspect (like many) have difficulty with is high frequency, esp bow noise... and that older folks like myself can no longer quite hear that... Usually my kids will hear it... quite harshly. But those highs still need to be there for clarity (sound too muddy or boxy with out) - Somewhat guessing if I tamed it... wondering if younger listeners can hear it?

Edited by - alaskafiddler on 04/21/2022 16:14:10

Apr 21, 2022 - 4:44:28 PM
likes this

2237 posts since 8/27/2008

Another thing I have to be careful with is compression. Much modern music is so highly compressed there is no dynamic range to speak of, in individual instruments or the overall mix. And yet a touch of compression can do good things.

Apr 21, 2022 - 6:03:09 PM

13485 posts since 9/23/2009

Nice fiddling! I think I prefer number one...although I am on the chromebook...so...lol...the sound isn't true on this thing.

Apr 21, 2022 - 6:21:12 PM

3055 posts since 9/13/2009

Oh yeah, good pick up Brian... I did throw in some compression to latter.  That was part of the goal... seeing examples of whats possible, in how can change or make different qualities... for better or worse, in folks home recording (not trying to compare to studio CD)... and evaluate, discuss opinions.

I just used some compression presets (on tracks and master); a bit indiscreetly without fine tweaking. The banjo esp has pretty aggressive ratio. As well on the master, a plug-in "adaptive limiter" (which I have no experience playing with)... after reverb. To my ears, the compression used does seem to add something I like... tame a bit of the transient attacks from distorting, and part of what giving low end some punch, and adding fullness... maybe? I understand some concepts of the various techniques of compression, but hardly play with it to gain much expertise... esp. for fiddle and banjo. 

FWIW... the point was examples for general discussion, comments, opinion of these effects - (don't worry about offending me/ego)... so welcome others comments.

Edited by - alaskafiddler on 04/21/2022 18:23:45

Apr 21, 2022 - 6:38:54 PM

3055 posts since 9/13/2009

quote:
Originally posted by groundhogpeggy

Nice fiddling! I think I prefer number one...although I am on the chromebook...so...lol...the sound isn't true on this thing.


Thanks. My goal wasn't which is better, voting... but discussing why or what qualities notice or like in each? Just thought might be informative discussion for folks.

I guess like your other discovery topic... do you think the latter sounds less like a cheap fiddle, fuller? Or help the sound in some way, at least point to direction (maybe not as extreme)?

----------

Bring up good point about how different devices can change the sound. All devices affect/color the sound. On my good full range stereo monitors... these tweaks can sound really good... on laptop or phone... little to no bass, mids and reverb sound way to emphasized. Sometimes the highs, esp the bow attack scritch is really noticeable, in small devices... AFAIK, mostly due to other frequencies not reproduced well... so stand out more. But works other way, sound good on laptop... but then horrible on good stereo. Which is impressive point of expert "mastering" engineers, to sound good on everything.

Edited by - alaskafiddler on 04/21/2022 18:43:50

Apr 21, 2022 - 8:29:03 PM

13485 posts since 9/23/2009

Well those are tough questions...I'll have to listen again on another device...I'm on the chromebook which has lousy speakers. I'll charge up ipad and see what it sounds like on there.

Apr 21, 2022 - 8:51:16 PM
likes this

2237 posts since 8/27/2008

I haven’t spent very much time in recording studios, but I have seen that they usually have small speakers there at the mixing board as well as the awsome speakers. That’s because the music wants to sound its best in a variety of environments. It could be argued that mixing on low qualty speakers is the more important. You can hear detail in big nice speakers but the true balance of the mix needs to work on more modest systems. Think of digging the Beatles on a pocket transister radio. Even stereo mixes were unimportant to them early on. EQ is important to give different parts of the sound clarity in a mix that comes through any system.

Apr 22, 2022 - 5:06:19 PM

3055 posts since 9/13/2009

One of the old school mix tricks was to copy it to cassette and play it in car, or boombox, or later a walkman. Still advisable technique to listen to different. Amazing how EQ can change the experience. I am still a bit perplexed how good mix/mastering can minimize the differences.

Hide these ads: join the Players Union!
Apr 23, 2022 - 7:42:23 AM

2237 posts since 8/27/2008

quote:
Originally posted by alaskafiddler

One of the old school mix tricks was to copy it to cassette and play it in car, or boombox, or later a walkman. Still advisable technique to listen to different. Amazing how EQ can change the experience. I am still a bit perplexed how good mix/mastering can minimize the differences.

 


Me too. And art and a science.

Apr 23, 2022 - 11:08:32 AM

Peghead

USA

1656 posts since 1/21/2009

dry for me, sounds clearer

Hide these ads: join the Players Union!

Hangout Network Help

View All Topics  |  View Categories

0.15625