Banjo Hangout Logo
Banjo Hangout Logo

Premier Sponsors

97
Fiddle Lovers Online


Jan 17, 2022 - 12:00:46 PM
1 posts since 1/17/2022

We used to puzzle over this shadowy title, but I have convinced myself lately that it is a navigational expression. Whether piloting a riverboat or other watercraft, vehicle or footwear around a riverbend, point of land, or bend in a road or skiing or walking trail, one seeks to minimize travel time by cutting as close as possible to the inside point of the turn.

Jan 17, 2022 - 1:51:56 PM

9951 posts since 3/19/2009

Apparently also known as "Knock Around the Kitchen, 'Til the Cook Comes In" in the Fiddler's Companion (also labeled Cuttin' At The PINT").... It'll be interesting to see what the authorities have to say..As I recall (could be wrong) the tune Seems a little like 'Wink the Other Eye"?????

Harmon, Welcome to the Hangout.. We have a lot of fun here.

Edited by - TuneWeaver on 01/17/2022 13:55:41

Jan 17, 2022 - 3:08:47 PM

1508 posts since 5/13/2008

On a river, cutting close to the inside corner is nothing but trouble. Its slower because the current is on the outside of the turn, and the inside is often confounded with sand and debris. Consequently, as there is really no advantage to doing it on a river, I think it is not a river term but perhaps an open water sailing term. Either way, I think cutting the corner is usually a bad idea, but, that shouldn't stop anyone from giving it a whirl...or playing it on a fiddle.

Edited by - fiddlerjoebob on 01/17/2022 15:11:17

Jan 17, 2022 - 4:06:49 PM

9951 posts since 3/19/2009

The Traditional Tune Archive offers this comment:
There has been much speculation as to the meaning of the title. Some think it refers to woodworking, roadbuilding or lumberjacking, or, that the title was originally "Cuttin' at the Pint" i.e. nipping from a whiskey bottle."

Here is another comment I found here on the hangout!!! :I   ""have always assumed Cuttin' At The Point to be a reference to lumbering at some geographical location called "the point." When, as a child I lived near the Adirondack Mountains my family frequently went camping on Louie Lake and we preferred the last (and highest) campsite on Eagle Point. The lake is heavily forested so there is no particular view from Eagle point - but if it rains (and it always rains in that area in mid-summer) the highest campsite drains the soonest. Always remember to have you tent openings on the downhill side.

Probably way off but when I think of 'cuttin' I think of cuttin' cattle!!! 
 

Edited by - TuneWeaver on 01/17/2022 16:14:46

Jan 17, 2022 - 6:26:27 PM
likes this

548 posts since 6/11/2019

Reminds me of the saying, "Nut Cuttin' Time"

Which doesn't really mean the season for mountain oysters, but more like, the time when you really get down to business that matters

Jan 18, 2022 - 1:05:47 AM
like this

2962 posts since 9/13/2009

I always thought it could just be reference to using a sharp knife... and technique sometimes used, literally cutting at the point of the knife (rather than the blade edge).

That said, I find stories about tune titles quite entertaining.

I think fiddle contest should include points given toward a good story about the tune; title or origin.

Whether true or not misses the point, is largely irrelevant to creativity and entertainment of a good story.

Jan 18, 2022 - 6:03:11 AM

9951 posts since 3/19/2009

quote:
Originally posted by alaskafiddler

I always thought it could just be reference to using a sharp knife... and technique sometimes used, literally cutting at the point of the knife (rather than the blade edge).

That said, I find stories about tune titles quite entertaining.

I think fiddle contest should include points given toward a good story about the tune; title or origin.

Whether true or not misses the point, is largely irrelevant to creativity and entertainment of a good story.

 


A few years ago here on the Hangout, I got in big trouble for speculating about the origin of a tune name..However, we DID have a lot of fun trying to determine how "Shove That Pig's Foot a Little Further into the Fire" became a tune name.

Jan 18, 2022 - 6:38:19 AM

RobBob

USA

2784 posts since 6/26/2007

Since I first heard Cuttin' at the Point from the Deseret String Band, I thought of moving cattle on horse back. The Pig's Foot thing is probably a smithy tool. "A ‘pig’s foot’ is a blacksmith’s tool that somewhat resembles a crowbar or poker, used to manipulate pieces of pig iron in a forge. "


 

Edited by - RobBob on 01/18/2022 06:40:05

Jan 18, 2022 - 8:11:08 AM

39 posts since 12/26/2021

I think a bit of ambiguity or double entendre (intentional or not) in a song title is a good thing. Sometimes a definitive answer is just a buzz kill. Not that I don't find the historical roots of folk tunes fascinating, but a possible smutty inerpretation to a tune title appeals to my inner child.

Jan 18, 2022 - 8:49:26 AM
likes this

13160 posts since 9/23/2009

When I hear the word, "cut" in relation to music, I always think of some kinda dance step.

Hide these ads: join the Players Union!
Jan 18, 2022 - 10:06:43 AM

5944 posts since 8/7/2009

Sal's Got Mud Between Her Toes

...what's the story behind that?

Edited by - tonyelder on 01/18/2022 10:08:35

Jan 18, 2022 - 10:24:12 AM
likes this

1822 posts since 4/6/2014

A "Cut" is a move in Irish step Dancing, (swinging your left heel up to the right of your hip or vice versa.....i think).... As is the "Point"...May have something to do with it???

Edited by - pete_fiddle on 01/18/2022 10:26:59

Jan 18, 2022 - 10:32:06 AM
likes this

DougD

USA

10545 posts since 12/2/2007
Online Now

I tend to think like Peggy on this. It suggests things like "cutting a rug," "cutting a shine," or just "cutting up."
Here's a definition from Merriam-Webster:
7a : to engage in (a frolicsome or mischievous action) … on summer nights strange capers are cut under the thin guise of a Christian festival. — Donald Culross Peattie
There is also the tradition of the "cutting contest," especially in jazz, where musicians try to outdo one another. I think also in dance where you might "cut in" to "cut" a fine figure and outdo the previous partner.
I don't think I've ever heard this tune, but I do think its odd that the Deseret string band, who specialized in Western music, would be the source of a tune seemingky local to Kentucky.

Jan 18, 2022 - 12:20:50 PM

9951 posts since 3/19/2009

There is a version of the tune on SLippery Hill..

Jan 18, 2022 - 1:02:38 PM
likes this

DougD

USA

10545 posts since 12/2/2007
Online Now

Thanks. Yes, and it has square dance calls (maybe more useful than some on old records) which makes it pretty clear to me what the title refers to. They're "cuttin' a rug," just as Peggy suggested.

Edited by - DougD on 01/18/2022 13:04:04

Jan 18, 2022 - 1:23:37 PM

9951 posts since 3/19/2009

I must admit that first, I was surprised to find it being used as a called dance tune and secondly, I was surprised that I couldn't find more recording of the tune on-line.. We have always played it as one of those hypnotic jam tunes that can go on for a loooong time.. Live and learn..

Jan 18, 2022 - 2:21:19 PM

DougD

USA

10545 posts since 12/2/2007
Online Now

I think that 1932 record is the sole source. Whether they used an existing tune, or whether its something they just dreamed up for the recording I can't say. It doesn't sound familiar to me.

Jan 18, 2022 - 2:30:40 PM

9951 posts since 3/19/2009

Different circles, different tunes... I first heard it (I think) being played by Chirps Smith from Chicago way back in the early 80's ... Loved it then, love it now..

Jan 18, 2022 - 2:44:45 PM

DougD

USA

10545 posts since 12/2/2007
Online Now

I meant it doesn't sound like any other tune I know, although I didn't listen very long.

Jan 19, 2022 - 4:34:59 AM

13160 posts since 9/23/2009

Here's a crazy notion I never thought of before...if "cutting a rug," "cutting a wing, " etc., whatever else, refers to dance steps (and I know absolutely nothing about dance, except that I can't seem to do it and never could), well...going back to the conversation about tempo, RichJ started it...wondering why OT tunes are played so likkedy split and why it's considered flatout wrong to take them slower...ok so I'm thinking, you know, when you do something in "cut time," where did that expression come from? Could it be that, hey, we can enjoy all the good stuff in this tune slow, or go to cut time when there's folks cutting a rug? I know, before somebody "instructs" me...I know it means going from 4 /4 time to 2/ 2 time...but my musing here is not WHAT the definition of cut time is, but whether the expression itself comes from the dance world to the fiddling world...we're playing for dancers, let's go to cut time...just wondering...thought never came to me before...just wondering for the first time right now, here in the cold with my first cup of nice hot coffee, which I'll retire from the forum for so I c an thoroughly enjoy.

Jan 19, 2022 - 9:02:30 AM

13160 posts since 9/23/2009

Hmmm...I think the above post had a grumpy tone to it...sorry...lol...there's been so many things making me feel just totally grumped out lately...I should have worded that in a kinder way.

Jan 20, 2022 - 4:28:42 PM

5804 posts since 9/26/2008

Cutting can indeed refer to cattle and horses, it is also a way to articulate notes in Irish music (not likely the title origin). Cutting at the pint seems like possibly misunderstanding an accent. I like the knife idea and the logging one too. Log barge? Who knows but it's a fun conversation starter.

Jan 20, 2022 - 7:38:05 PM
like this

2601 posts since 10/22/2007

"Cutting at the point" rings to me like, "Cutting it fine."
Not that this helps actually.

Jan 24, 2022 - 10:20:03 AM

9951 posts since 3/19/2009

We haven't heard from Uncle Farmin since he made the OP... Maybe we scared him off....!!laugh I hate when that happens..!

A personal message may get him to comment..!

Hide these ads: join the Players Union!

Hangout Network Help

View All Topics  |  View Categories

0.203125