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Jan 14, 2022 - 10:27:10 AM

8 posts since 12/10/2021

quote:
Originally posted by doryman
quote:
Originally posted by Zac

I had no lyrics in mind. Only the sound of the fiddle. Let's not get mean about it. There's no need for that.


I you are suggesting that I was being mean, then I apologize.  If you are suggesting that someone was mean to me, I didn't notice it!  


No. It just felt like the discussion was turning too critical on a simple fun question that doesn't need to be over analyzed.

Jan 14, 2022 - 10:51:50 AM
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727 posts since 3/1/2020

I think the responses are going to be completely subjective if we go by the melody alone. Your response to a melody can depend on the way it’s played, the context in relation to other tunes, the venue, or even your own mood when listening or playing.

Leonard Bernstein did a series of televised lectures about music designed for young listeners. They were incredible, and they weren’t dumbed-down like most children’s lectures. I’m linking the episode entitled “What Does Music Mean?” In it, Bernstein makes the argument that music does not have a set meaning, but the continuous progression of sound and rhythm evokes an emotional response in us that can have any number of meanings to us. To demonstrate, he takes a couple pieces and invents stories to go along with them, then tells what the original stories were. Both fit equally well even though one version was the composer’s personal meaning. I think this lecture is one that everyone who listens to music of any kind should hear.
youtu.be/9y9fHoB4P2g

Jan 14, 2022 - 11:08:16 AM
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DougD

USA

10549 posts since 12/2/2007
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Doryman - Interesting (and quite gloomy) interpretation of the song. Mine is quite different. "Her mother said she just stepped out" - there's no sense of concern and no search parties or anything. Also its not snowing and there's a "big round moon." The singer goes out and easily finds her by her footprints, even though she's lost her way. The Bill Monroe song isn't very specific, but in my mind they walk back hand in hand in the moonlight and spend a cozy evening in front of a cheery fire, eating roasted chestnuts and apples, and drinking mulled cider. Maybe then Mother gets out the bundling board and everyone settles down for a long winters nap.
The song is told from the vantage point of old age, after a long happy life together.
You might be interested in this page about the history of this song: bluegrasstoday.com/footprints-in-the-snow/
I'm pretty familiar with this song, from Bill Monroe's version to passing around a fiddle at the local flea market, and I've never heard it presented or received in the way you describe. Its a song of thanks and happy contentment.

Jan 14, 2022 - 11:11:15 AM

8 posts since 12/10/2021

I wasn't really looking for a psychological evaluation of emotional connections to music. Just looking for fiddle tunes that you feel are sad sounding. I just love the sound of those long slow notes and how it sounds like the fiddle is crying from a broken heart. I'm just a simple country boy here, not some decades old virtuoso with years of classical training and music theory under my belt.

Jan 14, 2022 - 11:24:07 AM
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727 posts since 3/1/2020

I agree that Footprints in the Snow, at least as I’ve always heard it, is not at all a sad song. The text suggests the singer went to call on his loved one and her mother said she’d gone out, so the former sought her out by following her footprints in the snow. The verse that mentions her being dead tells us, not that he discovered a frozen corpse, but that the fallen snow brings up the happy memory of finding her on that momentous day.

I wouldn’t be surprised if someone came up with an alternate version, though.

I don’t think you can have a discussion about music without it being analytical, but that’s not a bad thing.

Jan 14, 2022 - 11:38:13 AM
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2140 posts since 8/27/2008

Yes, she is dead now but he recalls finding her long ago in the snow. Bless that happy day. Even the melody is uplifting.

Jan 14, 2022 - 12:11:05 PM

doryman

USA

309 posts since 2/10/2020

quote:
Originally posted by DougD


I'm pretty familiar with this song, from Bill Monroe's version to passing around a fiddle at the local flea market, and I've never heard it presented or received in the way you describe. Its a song of thanks and happy contentment.


Well, I'm certainly not the only one to wonder about the meaning of the Bill Monroe version.  A quick internet search will reveal many discussions on the matter.   I mean, after getting gobsmacked by "Banks of the Ohio," anything is possible in a BG or OT song. 

Jan 14, 2022 - 12:37:33 PM
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DougD

USA

10549 posts since 12/2/2007
Online Now

Zac - Do you know "Midnight on the Water?" I think that's a melancholy tune that no one has mentioned.

Jan 14, 2022 - 3:24:14 PM
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5806 posts since 9/26/2008

I always found this "simple" one, played by Mr Haley, to be pretty heart wrenching.

https://youtu.be/cnlQsl5C2yI

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Jan 14, 2022 - 5:07:52 PM
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274 posts since 6/3/2016

The Ancient Barons of Kilravock

https://youtu.be/jd4Nk4j_34s

Jan 14, 2022 - 6:27:39 PM
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9988 posts since 3/19/2009

A sad tune that I've been playing.. alone, in C, for over 30 years is O'Carolan's Farewell to music..I always play it very slow ..Here is Martin Hayes playing it.. and you Know (yeah, sure) that I sound that good when I play itsmiley Enjoy: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QRTfM0exIms

Edited by - TuneWeaver on 01/14/2022 18:28:01

Jan 15, 2022 - 6:38:23 AM
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RichJ

USA

670 posts since 8/6/2013

quote:
Originally posted by Swing

Slight addition to the subject.... Fiddler Brian Duckworth (New Braunfels TX) wrote a song called 'Fiddle Don't Cry' Try and find it...

Play Happy

Swing


Couldn't find the tune, but did find I nice vid of a Brian Duckworth interview. His final comment is a gem. "I eat chocolate because I like  eating chocolate. I play the fiddle because I like playing the fiddle. I don't think I can parse it into smaller pieces."

 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YhsEGWc0k9c

Jan 15, 2022 - 7:32:13 AM
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5806 posts since 9/26/2008

quote:
Originally posted by TuneWeaver

A sad tune that I've been playing.. alone, in C, for over 30 years is O'Carolan's Farewell to music..I always play it very slow ..Here is Martin Hayes playing it.. and you Know (yeah, sure) that I sound that good when I play itsmiley Enjoy: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QRTfM0exIms


It's pronounced Martin Hayes but he spells it "Alasdair Fraser" winklaugh

Jan 15, 2022 - 7:35:20 AM
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wilford

USA

273 posts since 6/26/2007

How about "Mississippi Waltz". This tune sounds sad to me. :(

Jan 16, 2022 - 3:41:13 AM
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209 posts since 4/5/2008

You might try having your bow strung with hair from a blind horse........


 

Jan 16, 2022 - 4:44:21 AM
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5954 posts since 8/7/2009

Don't hit your grandma with a great big stick

"Pa, you know that one always makes me cry"

Jan 16, 2022 - 5:30:16 AM
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727 posts since 3/1/2020

quote:
Originally posted by Mark Ralston

You might try having your bow strung with hair from a blind horse........


That article is priceless! I wonder just what the "fiddle fixer" did with that bow and what he said in response. 

Jan 16, 2022 - 6:20:48 AM
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1511 posts since 5/13/2008

For me I think it's "Dogwood Winter". Here is Blaine Sprouse....

youtu.be/-ONMkUDMM1o

 

Edited by - fiddlerjoebob on 01/16/2022 06:21:19

Jan 16, 2022 - 6:31:12 AM

209 posts since 4/5/2008

Mays Badgett was a luthier in Atlanta in 1909, which was slightly before the heyday of the Skillet Lickers. In 1909 Gid Tanner would have been 24, Fate Norris would have been 31, and Riley Puckett would have been 15, so there may be some Skillet Licker humor in that newspaper article.


 

Jan 16, 2022 - 6:42:45 AM
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Baileyb

USA

102 posts since 1/24/2019

Jan 16, 2022 - 7:30:03 AM

727 posts since 3/1/2020

quote:
Originally posted by Mark Ralston

Mays Badgett was a luthier in Atlanta in 1909, which was slightly before the heyday of the Skillet Lickers. In 1909 Gid Tanner would have been 24, Fate Norris would have been 31, and Riley Puckett would have been 15, so there may be some Skillet Licker humor in that newspaper article.


I think I've seen at least one violin with either a Mays Badgett label or signature. I work on violins that are sent in from Atlanta frequently. 

Jan 16, 2022 - 9:05:48 AM

8 posts since 12/10/2021

quote:
Originally posted by fiddlerjoebob

For me I think it's "Dogwood Winter". Here is Blaine Sprouse....

youtu.be/-ONMkUDMM1o

@fiddlerjoebob Yeah that's a nice one ??


Apr 16, 2022 - 7:15:42 AM

17 posts since 9/22/2021

quote:
Originally posted by carlb

Elk River Blues
About the loss of farm to eminent domain and the building of dam.
https://www.slippery-hill.com/content/elk-river-blues


This was going to be my first suggestion! Totally relatable tune for me too. I like to play Bonnie Prince Charlie in Gm which makes it a bit mournful. 

Edited by - mtnfidil on 04/16/2022 07:20:56

Apr 16, 2022 - 3:28:04 PM

391 posts since 7/30/2021

I've always loved "She Moved Through the Fair", it's kind of wistful and slow and haunting...
(I guess, traditionally sung, but I like to play it on classical guitar and on my fiddle)

Edited by - NCnotes on 04/16/2022 15:31:38

Apr 16, 2022 - 4:02:29 PM

78 posts since 10/21/2007

Canray Fontenot: Barres De La Prison (1983)
youtube.com/watch?v=as6mxuMNTZ4

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