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Fiddle Lovers Online


Nov 30, 2021 - 11:22:27 PM
1528 posts since 7/26/2015

Have y'all seen any examples of famous violin or fiddle instructors, particularly those who have published instructional books, videos, or audio, teaching students things that will hurt their tone, timing, intonation, etc., hardwire limits into their playing style, or hurt their bodies in the long run?

Dec 1, 2021 - 7:06:15 AM
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451 posts since 7/30/2021

My guitar teacher had big hands with long fingers, and took for granted that I could do the same stuff...
but I injured my left hand trying to make the longer reaches (couldn't play music for almost a year, that was depressing).
Looking back, I should have switched from a fullsize guitar to a shortscale guitar...

You have to pay attention to your own body and what it's saying to you,
that's probably the most important thing!

I think I'm saying...even with a live teacher who is a good musician, went to music school, etc...
you can still get hurt if you ignore your body signals. 

Edited by - NCnotes on 12/01/2021 07:19:28

Dec 1, 2021 - 7:32:19 AM
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13451 posts since 9/23/2009

I agree with NC. It's up to the individual to figure out exactly what's ergonomic and unharmful, or I should say least harmful, to their own bodies.

So...who's to say what's good or bad technique? I'm figuring if you play classical on any instrument, the demands are so treacherous that you would have to really hone in on what experts throughout the ages have come up with and then still weigh that against how your own body works.

But if you play or even teach a folk style, whatever works, works. And it might be different for any one individual. Just my humble opinion...could be wrong of course, but look at all the ways fiddlers hold their fiddle, their bow, their posture, etc. Who's right and who's wrong?

Dec 1, 2021 - 8:20:39 AM
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2697 posts since 10/22/2007

quote:
Originally posted by soppinthegravy

Have y'all seen any examples of famous violin or fiddle instructors, particularly those who have published instructional books, videos, or audio, teaching students things that will hurt their tone, timing, intonation, etc., hardwire limits into their playing style, or hurt their bodies in the long run?


Two words: 'Shoulder Rest'

Any instructor, so dead set against it or for it, for that matter, impedes the student from the start. 

Dec 1, 2021 - 11:08:18 AM

765 posts since 3/1/2020

This is a dangerous topic. I have a feeling that once a name is thrown out, there will be a lot of fighting about it!

Dec 1, 2021 - 11:27:11 AM
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2593 posts since 7/12/2013

quote:
Originally posted by NCnotes

My guitar teacher had big hands with long fingers, and took for granted that I could do the same stuff...
but I injured my left hand trying to make the longer reaches (couldn't play music for almost a year, that was depressing).
Looking back, I should have switched from a fullsize guitar to a shortscale guitar...


Whenever I complained about that to my classical guitar teacher he would alway spoint to Andres Segovia and his short stubby hands playing on concert classical guitars.

Dec 1, 2021 - 2:14:53 PM

5879 posts since 9/26/2008

I don't think my fiddle teacher, way back when, cared as much about intonation as I did. Not that it hindered me, but I did take it upon myself to move along after a couple of years of lessons.

Dec 23, 2021 - 10:42:50 AM

775 posts since 8/10/2017

I took classical lessons over zoom. My teacher wanted my bow really close to the bridge. It sounds really bad there. I don't think zoom gives you a very accurate sound so I don't think she could hear what I heard. I also struggled to hear her. It all sounded terrible on zoom.

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