Banjo Hangout Logo
Banjo Hangout Logo

Premier Sponsors

111
Fiddle Lovers Online


Oct 16, 2021 - 7:17:02 PM
like this
9496 posts since 3/19/2009

On a rare occasion, I'll get a compliment about my fiddling.. My response is always, "Thanks..I have years of in-experience''...meaning that I still learning!!!
One thing that I Finally can do is to get that little scratchy, triplet sound so common in Irish fiddling, by 'floating' (I call it!) my bow ..I even throw that sound into OT tunes these days just because I'm so excited that I can Finally do it.. I've spent Years working on it off and on
What is something that YOU have years of in-experience with?

Oct 16, 2021 - 8:36:15 PM

1904 posts since 12/11/2008

Managing to hit the first position C squarely on the nose on the A string when I'm going up the scale. I finally realize that my broad-shouldered fingers are fat enough to force me to really squeeze the middle finger against the index finger if I want to get the C right. Weirdly, all the minor thirds above an open string take different amounts of squeezing/positioning to get 'em right. One of those wonderful things about the fiddle...

Oct 17, 2021 - 3:41:45 AM
likes this
Players Union Member

carlb

USA

2373 posts since 2/2/2008

As left handed, playing right handed, my continuous clockwise circles are still very awkward to do. Worked on it for five years many years ago and then gave up. Still use it on occasion, but can't really play "The Devil's Dream" smoothly.

Also, I'm still working on the intonation of the double stop E(3rd string) C#(string), which I like to use sometimes for an A chord.

Oct 17, 2021 - 4:17:54 AM
likes this

12517 posts since 9/23/2009

...tick tock, tick tock...I think I'm still working on it...lol...

Oct 17, 2021 - 5:22:51 AM
likes this

2468 posts since 10/22/2007

Someone recently recorded a jam I was in. My tone was AWFUL!
Ughhh! I gotta back up, slow down, and be purposeful. Think: Kenny Baker, Kenny Baker, Kenny Baker. I know it won't get there, but i still gotta strive.

Oct 17, 2021 - 6:09:38 AM

9496 posts since 3/19/2009

quote:
Originally posted by groundhogpeggy

...tick tock, tick tock...I think I'm still working on it...lol...


Yes.. I can relate to that. For about a Decade I had the worst timing of anyone in our jam group. Finally, I became so embarrassed that I just Tackled my Metronome and stuck with it until I had internal timing and could play at ANY reasonable metronome setting...My rule has since been, "If I can't play a tune tight at any one of several random metronome settings, then I still don't know that tune.'"

Oct 17, 2021 - 6:22:54 AM
likes this

Baileyb

USA

94 posts since 1/24/2019

quote:
Originally posted by TuneWeaver

 
One thing that I Finally can do is to get that little scratchy, triplet sound so common in Irish fiddling, by 'floating' (I call it!) my bow ..I even throw that sound into OT tunes these days just because I'm so excited that I can Finally do it.. I've spent Years working on it off and on
 


That elusive Bowed Triplet is my bane! I've watched this video many times in pursuit of it. Haven't caught it yet.

Bowed Triplet

Oct 17, 2021 - 6:24:41 AM

9496 posts since 3/19/2009

quote:
Originally posted by Baileyb
quote:
Originally posted by TuneWeaver

 
One thing that I Finally can do is to get that little scratchy, triplet sound so common in Irish fiddling, by 'floating' (I call it!) my bow ..I even throw that sound into OT tunes these days just because I'm so excited that I can Finally do it.. I've spent Years working on it off and on
 


That elusive Bowed Triplet is my bane! I've watched this video many times in pursuit of it. Haven't caught it yet.

Bowed Triplet

 


I found that particular video to be very helpful!!!! 

Oct 17, 2021 - 9:20:18 AM
like this

doryman

USA

231 posts since 2/10/2020

quote:
Originally posted by TuneWeaver
quote:
Originally posted by groundhogpeggy

...tick tock, tick tock...I think I'm still working on it...lol...


Yes.. I can relate to that. For about a Decade I had the worst timing of anyone in our jam group. Finally, I became so embarrassed that I just Tackled my Metronome and stuck with it until I had internal timing and could play at ANY reasonable metronome setting...My rule has since been, "If I can't play a tune tight at any one of several random metronome settings, then I still don't know that tune.'"


I want to improve my timing too.  I've purchased several metronomes but I can't seem to find a decent or reliable one.  I've gone through five or six now and not a one can keep a steady beat. 

Oct 17, 2021 - 9:59:24 AM
like this

gapbob

USA

787 posts since 4/20/2008

That elusive Bowed Triplet is my bane! I've watched this video many times in pursuit of it. Haven't caught it yet.

Bowed Triplet

 


I found that particular video to be very helpful!!!! 



Originally posted by TuneWeaver

 
One thing that I Finally can do is to get that little scratchy, triplet sound so common in Irish fiddling, by 'floating' (I call it!) my bow ..I even throw that sound into OT tunes these days just because I'm so excited that I can Finally do it.. I've spent Years working on it off and on
 


That isn't a bowed triplet, it is two sixteenth notes and an eighth note, played the way it is written.  A Scottish "cut", with emphasis on the first 16th and the eighth note, when I do that I feel it in my biceps, perhaps tricep, but in my upper arm.

A bowed triplet, used in Irish music, originates for the most part in the wrist.  Think of it as throwing your hand down, from a loose position, and then tighten up your wrist immediately, so that you get it to bounce—it is important to keep the direction of the thrown wrist in the same direction as the bow, you don't want to push the bow into the string, which also goes (even more so) for the "cut" above.

They are different animals.

Oct 17, 2021 - 11:56:35 AM
likes this

1635 posts since 4/6/2014

There are a few ways folk seem to play a bowed triplet, once you find the right one for you, and the way you want the tune to sound, it will be hard to stop doing it and play a roll or cut etc, instead.

The subtlety's of your internal rhythm(s) will dictate how you play the triplet Eg: if you have a "Potato, Potato" groove going on internally you will play them differently from a "Diddy Diddy" Scots player or a "Dubba Dubba" Irish player, or a DubbaDum, DubbaDum, Canadian player...etc

But i'm probably wrong about this as well....Ah well..

Oct 17, 2021 - 12:20:58 PM

9496 posts since 3/19/2009

quote:
Originally posted by doryman
quote:
Originally posted by TuneWeaver
quote:
Originally posted by groundhogpeggy

...tick tock, tick tock...I think I'm still working on it...lol...


Yes.. I can relate to that. For about a Decade I had the worst timing of anyone in our jam group. Finally, I became so embarrassed that I just Tackled my Metronome and stuck with it until I had internal timing and could play at ANY reasonable metronome setting...My rule has since been, "If I can't play a tune tight at any one of several random metronome settings, then I still don't know that tune.'"


I want to improve my timing too.  I've purchased several metronomes but I can't seem to find a decent or reliable one.  I've gone through five or six now and not a one can keep a steady beat. 


John, what you don't seem to realize is that a metronome right out of the box has NO idea how to work and keep time.. It is up to you to teach it how to keep time.. THe more it works with YOU the more IT learns, and eventually you teach it how to keep steady time.!!!!  You should have read the instructions..  Most people assume that a metronome is for teaching You, but in fact it is Learning from you... :)

Oct 17, 2021 - 12:23:47 PM

9496 posts since 3/19/2009

quote:
Originally posted by pete_fiddle

There are a few ways folk seem to play a bowed triplet, once you find the right one for you, and the way you want the tune to sound, it will be hard to stop doing it and play a roll or cut etc, instead.

The subtlety's of your internal rhythm(s) will dictate how you play the triplet Eg: if you have a "Potato, Potato" groove going on internally you will play them differently from a "Diddy Diddy" Scots player or a "Dubba Dubba" Irish player, or a DubbaDum, DubbaDum, Canadian player...etc

But i'm probably wrong about this as well....Ah well..


In the past I've played the bowed triplets on an UP bow.. but now can do them on a down bow as well.. I've noticed that some players use a twist of the frog to get that sound and others do other things, so Yes, everyone finds what works for them..

Oct 17, 2021 - 12:27 PM

9496 posts since 3/19/2009

quote:
Originally posted by gapbob

That elusive Bowed Triplet is my bane! I've watched this video many times in pursuit of it. Haven't caught it yet.

Bowed Triplet

 


I found that particular video to be very helpful!!!! 



Originally posted by TuneWeaver

 
One thing that I Finally can do is to get that little scratchy, triplet sound so common in Irish fiddling, by 'floating' (I call it!) my bow ..I even throw that sound into OT tunes these days just because I'm so excited that I can Finally do it.. I've spent Years working on it off and on
 


That isn't a bowed triplet, it is two sixteenth notes and an eighth note, played the way it is written.  A Scottish "cut", with emphasis on the first 16th and the eighth note, when I do that I feel it in my biceps, perhaps tricep, but in my upper arm.

A bowed triplet, used in Irish music, originates for the most part in the wrist.  Think of it as throwing your hand down, from a loose position, and then tighten up your wrist immediately, so that you get it to bounce—it is important to keep the direction of the thrown wrist in the same direction as the bow, you don't want to push the bow into the string, which also goes (even more so) for the "cut" above.

They are different animals.


I've always been confused by what others call that sound..!!! In my own mind, I call it a 'floating triplet'  but If I get the sound I'm looking for it doesn't matter what others call it..

.. 

Oct 17, 2021 - 12:32:53 PM

2468 posts since 10/22/2007

quote:
Originally posted by doryman
quote:
Originally posted by TuneWeaver
quote:
Originally posted by groundhogpeggy

...tick tock, tick tock...I think I'm still working on it...lol...


Yes.. I can relate to that. For about a Decade I had the worst timing of anyone in our jam group. Finally, I became so embarrassed that I just Tackled my Metronome and stuck with it until I had internal timing and could play at ANY reasonable metronome setting...My rule has since been, "If I can't play a tune tight at any one of several random metronome settings, then I still don't know that tune.'"


I want to improve my timing too.  I've purchased several metronomes but I can't seem to find a decent or reliable one.  I've gone through five or six now and not a one can keep a steady beat. 


So you're the guy.

Oct 18, 2021 - 6:07:57 AM
likes this

Baileyb

USA

94 posts since 1/24/2019

quote:
Originally posted by gapbob

That elusive Bowed Triplet is my bane! I've watched this video many times in pursuit of it. Haven't caught it yet.

Bowed Triplet

 


 


That isn't a bowed triplet, it is two sixteenth notes and an eighth note, played the way it is written.  A Scottish "cut", with emphasis on the first 16th and the eighth note, when I do that I feel it in my biceps, perhaps tricep, but in my upper arm.

A bowed triplet, used in Irish music, originates for the most part in the wrist.  Think of it as throwing your hand down, from a loose position, and then tighten up your wrist immediately, so that you get it to bounce—it is important to keep the direction of the thrown wrist in the same direction as the bow, you don't want to push the bow into the string, which also goes (even more so) for the "cut" above.

They are different animals.


Like most tunes, it isn't played as it is written. Each regional style has its own flavor.

Bowed Triplet - Kevin Burke

Scottish Cut / Bowed Triplet - Hanneke Cassel

Oct 20, 2021 - 3:14:15 PM
likes this

123 posts since 7/30/2021

quote:
Originally posted by TuneWeaver

On a rare occasion, I'll get a compliment about my fiddling.. My response is always, "Thanks..I have years of in-experience''...meaning that I still learning!!!
One thing that I Finally can do is to get that little scratchy, triplet sound so common in Irish fiddling, by 'floating' (I call it!) my bow ..I even throw that sound into OT tunes these days just because I'm so excited that I can Finally do it.. I've spent Years working on it off and on
What is something that YOU have years of in-experience with?

Thanks to my obsessive re-playing and playing along with a Kesh Jig video by Kevin Burke (and staring at his fingers) I can now do a Roll!  In time, in rhythm... without slowing the beat of the tune. I don't want to tell you how many times I played that video over... :-)

If you can do those scratchy triplets, my hat's off to you! Love the way it sounds.


Oct 20, 2021 - 6:31:33 PM
likes this

9496 posts since 3/19/2009

quote:
Originally posted by NCnotes
quote:
Originally posted by TuneWeaver

On a rare occasion, I'll get a compliment about my fiddling.. My response is always, "Thanks..I have years of in-experience''...meaning that I still learning!!!
One thing that I Finally can do is to get that little scratchy, triplet sound so common in Irish fiddling, by 'floating' (I call it!) my bow ..I even throw that sound into OT tunes these days just because I'm so excited that I can Finally do it.. I've spent Years working on it off and on
What is something that YOU have years of in-experience with?

Thanks to my obsessive re-playing and playing along with a Kesh Jig video by Kevin Burke (and staring at his fingers) I can now do a Roll!  In time, in rhythm... without slowing the beat of the tune. I don't want to tell you how many times I played that video over... :-)

If you can do those scratchy triplets, my hat's off to you! Love the way it sounds.


 


It was only after the fact that I realized I could do those scratchy thingys on both up bow and down bows... For the longest time I could only do the up bows..

Oct 21, 2021 - 7:07:50 AM
likes this

123 posts since 7/30/2021

Yep. It's weird how our bodies are!
In our chamber group I have to cue on an Upbow, and I just can't. I keep messing it up. I was practicing my cue while walking the dog (deep breath, then body movement, + upbow movement) and people were looking at me strangely...
On the other hand, downbow cues feel quite simple and natural, no problem. Our bodies are mysterious!

Oct 21, 2021 - 11:41:23 AM
likes this

5505 posts since 9/26/2008

There is a common turn around/phrase ending that I have only recently gotten comfortable playing. I started playing "Sally Gooden" in G and it is now easy. The phrase is that repeated coarse part which is often at the end of tunes or tune sections - b g a f# g as played between the A and D strings. For some reason it has always been a weasel for me, likely because I didn't often lay the g and f# fingers down at the same time.

Oct 25, 2021 - 6:27:53 PM

9496 posts since 3/19/2009

quote:
Originally posted by ChickenMan

There is a common turn around/phrase ending that I have only recently gotten comfortable playing. I started playing "Sally Gooden" in G and it is now easy. The phrase is that repeated coarse part which is often at the end of tunes or tune sections - b g a f# g as played between the A and D strings. For some reason it has always been a weasel for me, likely because I didn't often lay the g and f# fingers down at the same time.


This  reminds me that I've noticed that every tune has that ONE little quirk that has to be tackled before I can say I've learned the tune..

Hangout Network Help

View All Topics  |  View Categories

0.1875