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Oct 1, 2021 - 9:01:50 AM

RichJ

USA

563 posts since 8/6/2013

I recently started making recordings with a Presonus Audiobox96 USB. I purchased it as a kit which including a Presonus M7 microphone. I have not been happy with the sound quality of recordings made so far, some of which I uploaded to our Sound Off page. I recently read somewhere that selecting a microphone for recording a fiddle present a special problem because of the added sound of bow friction on the strings. I know things like the room used for recording and distance from the microphone can have significant effects on sound quality. Wonder if anyone has suggestions for microphones they use in making recordings.

Oct 1, 2021 - 10:05:11 AM

113 posts since 1/21/2017

I don't know. I'm not an expert, but from what I hear, at least on the Happy Hollow recording, is the room ambiance. It sounds more like a field recording. Maybe get a lot closer for a more direct and punchy sound, and work on the fiddle/guitar mix if you're not multitracking. I would spend some time experimenting before I started buying more stuff. I think that your fiddle sounds fine with that mic.

Edited by - coryobert on 10/01/2021 10:13:15

Oct 1, 2021 - 10:12:20 AM
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DougD

USA

10329 posts since 12/2/2007

Well, its a $70 microphone, if that tells you anything. But that might not mean much really. On the Presonus site it says its great for vocals, guitar, and podcasts (vocals again). Microphones for this purpose, especially large diaphragm condensers, usually have some kind of "presence peak" somewhere in the upper midrange or high end for greater "clarity." The peak on this mic is a little higher than some, but in any case that's not kind to fiddles, because there's often a lot of scratchiness up there. You'd be better off with a mic with a flatter response (or you could try some EQ), but they're hard to find these days, because the main purpose for contemporary mics is vocals and acoustic guitars (and maybe drums) because a lot of other things are sampled, not played live.
Speaking of that, I think you're using Strum machine or some kind of prerecorded track for the guitar. I've been wondering how you include that in the recording?

Oct 1, 2021 - 10:17:12 AM

113 posts since 1/21/2017

quote:
Originally posted by DougD


Speaking of that, I think you're using Strum machine or some kind of prerecorded track for the guitar.


Good ear.

Oct 1, 2021 - 10:26:37 AM
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DougD

USA

10329 posts since 12/2/2007

Not really, I think Rich said that at some point.
BTW, I agree with a lot of what you said in your previous post. I've recorded and produced a lot of recordings over the years, and I'd say the most important things are: 1) The player 2) The instrument 3) The acoustic environment 4) The microphone 5) Everything else
Sometimes you just have to play around. Fiddles usually sound best at some distance away, but if the acoustic is bad that doesn't help. And if you"re trying to include a guitar through a speaker that complicates things further.

Oct 1, 2021 - 11:18:55 AM

RichJ

USA

563 posts since 8/6/2013

quote:
Originally posted by coryobert
quote:
Originally posted by DougD


Speaking of that, I think you're using Strum machine or some kind of prerecorded track for the guitar.


Good ear.


...and a second to that! I sure don't know much about recording in general and the Presonus in particular.  The Studio One-4 program that came with the machine has a bazillion buttons to push for various effect and I sure don' have a clue about those either. As far as recording the Strum Machine backup I just record that on a separate track with the M7 mic and what comes out of my computer speakers - which sure ain't much, just a Dell SoundBar attached to my computer screen.

Yeah, and as far as Doug's thoughts on things that effect sound quality I totally agree. The weakest link in the chain as far as I'm concerned is ME.

Oct 1, 2021 - 5:15:49 PM

7 posts since 1/5/2019

This book is a fantastic resource for learning more if you want to jump down the recording rabbit hole: https://www.amazon.com/Recording-Secrets-Small-Studio-Presents/dp/0415716705. It takes some practice, not unlike playing the fiddle!

Oct 1, 2021 - 5:41:51 PM
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450 posts since 7/18/2014

Rich, if you want to make a better sounding strum track you can download your strum part as an mp3, then just drag it over into your Studio One program track thing and it should open up for you just like it was on the strum machine. However, that will now cause you to need headphones so you can hear the playback, so you can play the fiddle in time along with it.

I play my strum track over into another computer by wire, not by mic, and then save it as a WAV file, then drag that over into the track thing. You don’t have to do that, it’s just another way to do it. (a better way I think)

Oct 1, 2021 - 8:16:51 PM

12496 posts since 9/23/2009

I agree with Randy...I say, not knowing one thing about strum machine...but I figured the easiest way to get a good mix with it would be to put the file into its own track on the presonus and then open up a new track of fiddle to go along with it. I don't know what I''m talking about, I should cautiously add...but it's what I think.

Oct 1, 2021 - 8:18:09 PM
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12496 posts since 9/23/2009

By the way...I've learned a buncha stuff about this kind of thing from Doug's many posts over the years...in my own awkward and amateur way...I've managed to take advantage of his vast recording knowledge...for sure.

Oct 2, 2021 - 4:53:20 AM

RichJ

USA

563 posts since 8/6/2013

quote:
Originally posted by Astrang

Rich, if you want to make a better sounding strum track you can download your strum part as an mp3, then just drag it over into your Studio One program track thing and it should open up for you just like it was on the strum machine. However, that will now cause you to need headphones so you can hear the playback, so you can play the fiddle in time along with it.

I play my strum track over into another computer by wire, not by mic, and then save it as a WAV file, then drag that over into the track thing. You don’t have to do that, it’s just another way to do it. (a better way I think)


I do make a separate a Strum track when recording, but do this by recording what comes out of the tiny Dell computer Soundbar speakers. Not sure how to make an mp3 recording of the Strum Machine other than recording with the Presonus. Well, I guess I could also do this with Audacity. Are you referring to   something like that?

Oct 2, 2021 - 7:23:21 AM
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450 posts since 7/18/2014

Let’s use Audacity but this should work on Studio One also.

First go to Strum Machine and open up the tune you want. Now look to the right side of the page and click on Record Next Playback. A red button will appear at the top and then click on that. The tune will start playing, as it plays it is recording it for you, just allow it to cycle. When it’s done (give it a minute more) click on the Show In Folder tab and a small window will appear. That’s where the file was sent to (so you can find it later). Leave that window open but scoot it over to the left side a little. Close out the Strum Machine page.

Now open up Audacity and make it a small size window also. Then just drag the new file over into the gray area of Audacity, and presto. You can start everything else from there, trim the ends, adjust the levels, and add more tracks, whatever. Hope this works for you.

Oct 3, 2021 - 7:51:38 AM
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RichJ

USA

563 posts since 8/6/2013

quote:
Originally posted by Astrang

Let’s use Audacity but this should work on Studio One also.

First go to Strum Machine and open up the tune you want. Now look to the right side of the page and click on Record Next Playback. A red button will appear at the top and then click on that. The tune will start playing, as it plays it is recording it for you, just allow it to cycle. When it’s done (give it a minute more) click on the Show In Folder tab and a small window will appear. That’s where the file was sent to (so you can find it later). Leave that window open but scoot it over to the left side a little. Close out the Strum Machine page.

Now open up Audacity and make it a small size window also. Then just drag the new file over into the gray area of Audacity, and presto. You can start everything else from there, trim the ends, adjust the levels, and add more tracks, whatever. Hope this works for you.


Hey Randy - That technique worked great! Much better sound quality of the Strum recording by directly dumping the mp3 file into Studio One. I was surprised how easiliy the mp3 file got converted. I just dragged and dropped it into the Studio One recording track and it got converted instantly.

Oct 3, 2021 - 8:53:32 AM

450 posts since 7/18/2014

That’s good to know Rich, I’m glad it worked for you. I look forward to your next recording.

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