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Sep 4, 2021 - 12:30:30 PM
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5486 posts since 9/26/2008

quote:
Originally posted by sbhikes2

The lessons will help because they give me some focus, I don't have to try to figure out where to put slurs and down bows myself and I can ask questions.


Your friends advice about OT to not worry about the bow rings in my ears as I read this. Of course you worry about the bow, it's how you make the sounds you want. I'm already liking your new instructor! 

Sep 4, 2021 - 12:38:31 PM
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1635 posts since 4/6/2014

quote:
Originally posted by sbhikes2

I like Canadian music, too.


You might like this then

Kevin Burke "Mouth Of The Tobique"

Sep 4, 2021 - 1:03:53 PM
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9468 posts since 3/19/2009

quote:
Originally posted by Baileyb

I found from reading the Bio's of most of the traditional Irish musicians is that they were born into their music. They were brought up listening and playing this music from early on.

Alaskafiddler's recount of Martin Hayes explanation is a perfect example of this. Here is a link to a video, young Martin and his father PJ did years ago. Yep born into it with the Heart and Soul of Irish music.

PJ & Martin Hayes
PS -  note Martin's bow hold.


Martin Hayes has influenced my fiddling a Lot.. From him I learned that each note has a beginning, a middle and an end...It is so easy to just play a bunch of notes and then wonder why they don't sound like music.. He taught me to listen..!

Sep 4, 2021 - 5:58:24 PM

Baileyb

USA

88 posts since 1/24/2019

quote:
Originally posted by ChickenMan

  I am a big fan of the flute and can tell you that those wind instruments (pipes, flutes, whistles) are the reason for the "ornaments."  The pipes cannot articulate two notes of the same pitch without some sort of articulation and the various cuts and pats and rolls grew out of that need. Typically flute and whistle don't use the tongue to articulate like one might hear in other musics, instead they also emulate the uilleann pipe technique and sound.   


Here's one for ya -  Uilleann pipe, flute, cello, fiddle, and guitar

Sep 4, 2021 - 6:40:37 PM

5486 posts since 9/26/2008

Matt Molloy is a legend.

Sep 5, 2021 - 11:46:27 AM

1635 posts since 4/6/2014

America has its own treasures of Irish music also here's just a couple of em

"hup Ya Boya !"
 

Sep 6, 2021 - 8:58:29 AM
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Players Union Member

boxbow

USA

2687 posts since 2/3/2011

quote:
Originally posted by pete_fiddle

America has its own treasures of Irish music also here's just a couple of em

"hup Ya Boya !"
 


Holy Smokes!  I had no clue.  Rock 'n' Roll will never die.

Sep 6, 2021 - 9:37:28 AM

755 posts since 8/10/2017

This is the person I'm taking lessons from. youtube.com/watch?v=Jd3qHcjVn-o I know him from our session.

Sep 6, 2021 - 9:43:56 AM

5486 posts since 9/26/2008

Bummer, his website link doesn't seem to be active.

Sep 6, 2021 - 12:34:31 PM

bsed

USA

4181 posts since 6/23/2007

quote:
Originally posted by Lonesome Fiddler

Practically every page of my O'Neill's 1001 Irish tune book is chock full of totally wonderful tunes. An embarrassment of riches. They aren't really that difficult to play, either. In any case, I have yet to see one that moves out of First Position.


If you look at Coles or Ryan's (I guess they're pretty much the same), you'll see a bunch of tunes that go up the neck, like Money Musk.

Sep 6, 2021 - 12:55:41 PM
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755 posts since 8/10/2017

quote:
Originally posted by ChickenMan

Bummer, his website link doesn't seem to be active.


Yeah, true. His Youtube channel is also not about Irish music. I know him in person, though.

Sep 7, 2021 - 12:34:15 PM

1635 posts since 4/6/2014

quote:
Originally posted by boxbow
quote:
Originally posted by pete_fiddle

America has its own treasures of Irish music also here's just a couple of em

"hup Ya Boya !"
 


Holy Smokes!  I had no clue.  Rock 'n' Roll will never die.


No really, i'm on the level here. The American Irish style really floats my boat. More so than the Lyrical, emotive stuff from the Irish Masters. It's one of my personal goals. And seems to me to be a marriage of a few different fiddle styles, O/T being one of them.

Sep 7, 2021 - 2:42 PM
Players Union Member

boxbow

USA

2687 posts since 2/3/2011

quote:
Originally posted by pete_fiddle
quote:
Originally posted by boxbow
quote:
Originally posted by pete_fiddle

America has its own treasures of Irish music also here's just a couple of em

"hup Ya Boya !"
 


Holy Smokes!  I had no clue.  Rock 'n' Roll will never die.


No really, i'm on the level here. The American Irish style really floats my boat. More so than the Lyrical, emotive stuff from the Irish Masters. It's one of my personal goals. And seems to me to be a marriage of a few different fiddle styles, O/T being one of them.


So am I.  That's some very exciting music.  Reading some of the comments on the video it seems that I wasn't the only one who didn't know you could do that with pipes.  I was thinking of those sock-footed organists playing the bass runs with their feet as the piper in the video slapped and smacked the bass levers.

Sep 9, 2021 - 11:18:05 AM

gapbob

USA

787 posts since 4/20/2008

Interesting, I never thought of there being an "American Irish" style, just some players who might play it more differently than others.

Sep 9, 2021 - 11:49:48 AM
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1292 posts since 7/18/2011

quote:
Originally posted by sbhikes2

So far with only two lessons (in the Sligo style), the emphasis has been on bowing direction, slurs and rhythm. Ornaments are also part of the tune and naturally he has to show me how to do it, but it's not a lesson in ornaments. They just are part of the tune. He didn't say okay, Irish music is about ornaments so here's how to do them. He said Irish music is about the rhythm and lift and here's how to do it. I see it as really quite the same as how you naturally grow to know where the little slides and double-stops go for old-time music.

I listen to far more Irish music than old-time. I like playing old-time but I do not like listening to it. I only went to old-time because I was invited. I grew to like it well enough but Irish music is my first love.


I agree with those who have been emphasising a holistic approach to Irish trad--it's more than the sum of its parts. That said, the individual parts are crucial as well.

For example, you'll never (except for instructional purposes) hear a recording by a proper Irish trad player (as opposed to generic 'Celtic' dilettantes) where ornamentation is absent. It's something that one needs to internalize in order to play in truly traditional style. Simply having the ability to do the motions required of a roll doesn't mean that it's a properly-executed one--that comes only with immersion in the tradition.

With regard to ornamentation in Irish trad, I like to use an analogy that might be more accessible to a general audience: it can be accurately said that blues music is more about particular scales, feel, approach, etc., but I doubt you'd hear much of it that doesn't include note bending, slides, etc. While these are 'ornaments' they're a big part of making the genre sound like it does--and players of the genre would note their absence. 

As a final remark, I would suggest not getting too hung up on rigid bowing 'patterns' or overemphasising bowing direction. If you watch Irish trad players, their bowing is all over the place--it would be extremely rare to find even a pair of bows in total synch in the average session. The pulse is the important thing--whatever gets you it. 

Sep 28, 2021 - 5:19:57 AM
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9 posts since 9/22/2021

quote:
Originally posted by gapbob

Interesting, I never thought of there being an "American Irish" style, just some players who might play it more differently than others.


Andy McGann, Brian Conway, Tony DeMarco, Liz Carroll et al would exemplify the "American Irish" style. Or, more properly as they used to be identified, NYC style (Coleman/Sligo influenced) or Chicago style. It developed through non-immigrant players (though with influence from native players in the early years) It became its own regional style. 

Edited by - mtnfidil on 09/28/2021 05:23:15

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