Banjo Hangout Logo
Banjo Hangout Logo

Premier Sponsors

160
Fiddle Lovers Online


Aug 29, 2021 - 2:04:56 PM
39 posts since 12/16/2016

Wondering if anyone can share with me how commonly this technique is used and is it unique to a particular builder, country, or time period. I’m just a hobby instrument repairer and found this wooden pin (see picture) running through the face plate into the heel of the neck. The neck block design also seems unique in that there is a wedge on either side of the heel and block. Hopefully you can discern that from the photo. Also, note the pin hole in the face plate. My granddaughter saved this fiddle from the neighbors trash can a few years ago and I’m just now getting to the end pin and face cracks repairs. Hence the face removal and surprising discovery. The label has the standard strad reference with no other clue as to maker or year. 
I edited this post to attach pics of the face and back plates, seems to be fairly nice material.


Edited by - stevo-msla on 08/29/2021 14:12:14

Aug 29, 2021 - 2:14:30 PM
likes this

2009 posts since 8/27/2008

Alignment pins are pretty common and go back to Stradavari I believe. I am a hobby builder and have never understood the need for them. They provide the top and bottom positions for gluing on the plates but they don't look especially good.

Aug 29, 2021 - 11:17 PM
likes this

567 posts since 3/1/2020

Alignment pins are quite common. They date back to the Cremonese tradition. Their purpose is to maintain proper position for the rib structure when drawing out plates and to assure proper orientation of the plates when they’re attached. The German makers used this idea as well, although many of the more commercial violins had pins added after the fact to give an appearance of following in the Cremonese tradition.

The style of neck joint on that violin is fairly common among inexpensive German instruments. It’s often referred to as a “through neck” because the neck extends into the back instead of being mortised into a top block. Slots are cut into the sides of the neck to allow wedges to be inserted as a supplement to the glue joint. Necks put in this way can remain solid, but they are much harder to work with if the projection is significantly deviated from the standard. A neck reset is necessary after cutting the extra portion off the neck and making a top block.

Aug 30, 2021 - 5:31:52 AM
likes this

kjb

USA

732 posts since 6/8/2013

I use them always , there are times you want to take the top off and on and when you glue up you want things to line up as well as you can , it does complicate taking one apart later but it just has to be calculated in when you are taking a top off.

Aug 30, 2021 - 6:18:22 AM
likes this

39 posts since 12/16/2016

I’m grateful Brian Wood, The Violin Beautiful, and kjb (aka Brian, Rich, and Kevin) to have your insightful responses on the use of alignment pins, the explanation of the neck bracing, and probable origin of this fiddle. Thanks for taking the time to respond with your experience and expertise. Steve

Sep 6, 2021 - 1:13:10 PM
likes this

46davis

USA

47 posts since 3/16/2021

I use them on my builds. Helps keep the alignment transferring the outline to the top and back before cutting and later when gluing.

That one's kind of thick, though. I use toothpicks and once the top and back are on they can be removed and the holes filled if you want.

Edited by - 46davis on 09/06/2021 13:15:04

Sep 6, 2021 - 2:48:56 PM
likes this

2009 posts since 8/27/2008

quote:
Originally posted by 46davis

I use them on my builds. Helps keep the alignment transferring the outline to the top and back before cutting and later when gluing.

That one's kind of thick, though. I use toothpicks and once the top and back are on they can be removed and the holes filled if you want.


I repaired a post crack on a fiddle with locating pins last week. They helped putting the top back on. I don't use them on my own builds. If I did I would make them so they don't go all the way through the top and show because that's what I don't care for.

Sep 6, 2021 - 6:17:11 PM
likes this

46davis

USA

47 posts since 3/16/2021

It's an excellent idea to not put them all the way through. I like to pull them out when the glue is dry to make the top and back come off easier if they ever have to be opened. They don't show on the top as the upper pin is under the fingerboard and the bottom pin is under the tailpiece. On the back, though they are visible, but only if you look for them as they take the varnish like maple.

Sep 6, 2021 - 8:01:34 PM
likes this

2009 posts since 8/27/2008

quote:
Originally posted by 46davis

It's an excellent idea to not put them all the way through. I like to pull them out when the glue is dry to make the top and back come off easier if they ever have to be opened. They don't show on the top as the upper pin is under the fingerboard and the bottom pin is under the tailpiece. On the back, though they are visible, but only if you look for them as they take the varnish like maple.


That's true. They're mostly visible on the back. 

Hangout Network Help

View All Topics  |  View Categories

0.1396484