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Aug 26, 2021 - 7:05:44 PM
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gapbob

USA

787 posts since 4/20/2008

I like how it sounds.

Aug 27, 2021 - 12:46:04 AM
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2784 posts since 9/13/2009

quote:
Originally posted by gapbob

I like how it sounds.


I don't think that is on the approved list.

According to much formal music education (and parents) claims; they list all sorts of reasons why learn an instrument...

Build all sorts of skills; discipline, attention, self-esteem, confidence, social skills, teamwork, empathy, cultured, physical coordination, better academic achievement, math skills, linguistic skills, memory, spatial skill, lateral thinking, creativity, emotion stability, healthy competitive spirit, executive function, organization, keep you away from alcohol/drugs/smoking, become more successful in life with higher earnings. At least from the right or "real" music.

Liking how it sounds seems irrelevant nonsense.laugh

Aug 27, 2021 - 4:32:13 AM
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5486 posts since 9/26/2008

And yet, it is still a pretty good reason to pick the fiddle over say, a tuba.

Aug 27, 2021 - 5:26:41 AM
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2465 posts since 10/22/2007

quote:
Originally posted by ChickenMan

And yet, it is still a pretty good reason to pick the fiddle over say, a tuba.


Definitely better than a saw 

Aug 27, 2021 - 7:43:56 AM
Players Union Member

boxbow

USA

2687 posts since 2/3/2011

Learning to play the musical saw should not be so very different from learning to fiddle. I spent a lot of time learning how to prevent my fiddle from doing awful, unmusical things while hoping in vain, so it seemed, that the brief intervals of musicality would lengthen. Eventually they did but the horribleness remains. It lurks even now inside that innocent looking, ever so beautifully grained wooden shape.

Edited by - boxbow on 08/27/2021 07:49:35

Aug 27, 2021 - 8:02:55 AM
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755 posts since 8/10/2017

Regarding being the umpteenth guitar or mandolinist, I can relate. And it's not just that there are many mandolinists, but it's that the mandolin is the ultimate "I can participate and I can hide at the same time" instrument within the non-bluegrass traditions that I play. You can participate because mandolin is not very hard and it even sounds nice while you are making mistakes. You can hide because nobody can hear you play the mandolin in a big jam. It seemed to me like I was not rising to a challenge, that I should try to do the hard thing, so that is what I decided to do by playing the fiddle.

I had a similar conversation yesterday about why play such a hard instrument with my violin teacher. In response to her saying that most people want to play violin because it is beautiful I told her that if I wanted to play a beautiful instrument I would choose the cello over the violin. I choose the violin because I like fiddle tunes, I like how you can slide into the notes and I really love how when we are playing it makes people happy. We play in a park and people walk by and stop and smile and sometimes little babies who can barely stand up will dance and it's so cute. When our Irish session plays in the park, people actually show up with folding chairs and sit and listen. Irish music seems to make people have an experience of transcendent spiritual feelings or something. Also sometimes there is Irish dancing. I play fiddle because fiddle music makes other people happy.

As for doing something for the hell of it, I got a tattoo for the hell of it. I have several tattoos. One is of a pet bird I had for 22 years who died. Another is for a long trail I hiked. But one is a tattoo I got one day as I was walking down the street. I walked into a tattoo shop and asked if they had time to put a butterfly on and they did so I did it right then and there. In many ways it's my favorite tattoo because it means absolutely nothing.

Aug 27, 2021 - 1:07:22 PM
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292 posts since 4/15/2019

As I have said before, picked up the guitar for the first time 64 yrs. Ago at the age of 14 . I seemed to be born with a love for what we called hillbilly music. To this day the sound of a bluegrass band sends chills down my spine. I dabbled with guitar, dulcimer, French harp. Did a decent job on all three. Always loved the fiddle but figured it was too difficult for me. Ages yrs. back my brother gave me a 3/4 size fiddle. I put some strings on it and it stayed under my bed for several yrs. At the age of 75 I got it out and decided to give it a shot. Bought a DVD by Jim Woods and started the journey. I told my wife if
I could learn Cotton Eyed Joe and Old Joe Clark, I'd be happy. That was the two tunes I learned from my DVD. Well, that wasn't enough. I have went on to learn about two dozen others and still looking for more. I'm at the point now to where if I hear a tune I like I can pick it up without too much trouble. I only wish I had started the fiddle yrs ago. Most of the ole boys I used to play guitar with are dead now. I hope God lets me play fiddle with them in heaven! I get with my little brother once or twice a yr. and play with him. I play something everyday. Simply love it!

Aug 27, 2021 - 1:08:57 PM

292 posts since 4/15/2019

quote:
Originally posted by old cowboy

As I have said before, picked up the guitar for the first time 64 yrs. Ago at the age of 14 . I seemed to be born with a love for what we called hillbilly music. To this day the sound of a bluegrass band sends chills down my spine. I dabbled with guitar, dulcimer, French harp. Did a decent job on all three. Always loved the fiddle but figured it was too difficult for me. A few yrs. back my brother gave me a 3/4 size fiddle. I put some strings on it and it stayed under my bed for several yrs. At the age of 75 I got it out and decided to give it a shot. Bought a DVD by Jim Woods and started the journey. I told my wife if
I could learn Cotton Eyed Joe and Old Joe Clark, I'd be happy. That was the two tunes I learned from my DVD. Well, that wasn't enough. I have went on to learn about two dozen others and still looking for more. I'm at the point now to where if I hear a tune I like I can pick it up without too much trouble. I only wish I had started the fiddle yrs ago. Most of the ole boys I used to play guitar with are dead now. I hope God lets me play fiddle with them in heaven! I get with my little brother once or twice a yr. and play with him. I play something everyday. Simply love it!


Aug 27, 2021 - 1:14:53 PM

292 posts since 4/15/2019

Sorry about double post!

Aug 27, 2021 - 3:04:26 PM

5486 posts since 9/26/2008

quote:
Originally posted by farmerjones
quote:
Originally posted by ChickenMan

And yet, it is still a pretty good reason to pick the fiddle over say, a tuba.


Definitely better than a saw 


SOME might say the same about a fiddle

Depends on how capable one is on said instruments. 

Aug 27, 2021 - 4:01:13 PM

755 posts since 8/10/2017

quote:
Originally posted by old cowboy

 Ages yrs. back my brother gave me a 3/4 size fiddle. I put some strings on it and it stayed under my bed for several yrs. At the age of 75 I got it out and decided to give it a shot. Bought a DVD by Jim Woods and started the journey.


Do you still play a 3/4 size fiddle? Was it hard to play a small fiddle as an adult?

Aug 27, 2021 - 4:10:01 PM
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bf

USA

34 posts since 12/25/2016

My grandfather lost the ends of the fingers on his left hand putting in a fence row when I was young. He gave me his fiddle not too long after. I guess part of the reason I play is to honor him. I regret not taking it seriously while he was still alive.

I also have fond memories of my folks playing guitar and banjo while I was young. I wanted to offer similar memories for my own children.

And finally, I find it hard not to. I play for the enjoyment, the memories, and the places you go to when playing with others.

Aug 27, 2021 - 8:00:53 PM

5486 posts since 9/26/2008

quote:
Originally posted by sbhikes2
quote:
Originally posted by old cowboy

 Ages yrs. back my brother gave me a 3/4 size fiddle. I put some strings on it and it stayed under my bed for several yrs. At the age of 75 I got it out and decided to give it a shot. Bought a DVD by Jim Woods and started the journey.


Do you still play a 3/4 size fiddle? Was it hard to play a small fiddle as an adult?


I wondered the same, but then if that was all you'd ever played, it would just be as hard as fiddling is. 

Aug 28, 2021 - 12:39:43 PM
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292 posts since 4/15/2019

Diane, no I did not stay with the small fiddle, I bought a regular sized one from Amazon for around 70 bucks to make sure I was going to stay with it. After about 4 months I knew I was hooked and bought me a nice one from the
Fiddlerman. I absolutely love it! I have the smaller one hanging on my wall as a decoration. I take it down and play it occasionally. It has a decent sound.

Aug 28, 2021 - 12:42:53 PM

292 posts since 4/15/2019

quote:
Originally posted by old cowboy

Diane, and chickenman , no I did not stay with the small fiddle, I bought a regular sized one from Amazon for around 70 bucks to make sure I was going to stay with it. After about 4 months I knew I was hooked and bought me a nice one from the
Fiddlerman. I absolutely love it! I have the smaller one hanging on my wall as a decoration. I take it down and play it occasionally. It has a decent sound.


Aug 28, 2021 - 1:21:15 PM
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1904 posts since 12/11/2008

I must have said it several times on this site, but the fiddle/violin gives you a singing voice. The notes/pitches you can wrestle from the device aren't hemmed in by keys or frets. You can sustain a note or utter a musical phrase for a long, long period of time. The only musical instrument I've found that lends a similar flexibility and freedom is an electric guitar strung with Slinkies and enough overdrive to lend sustain.

Aug 28, 2021 - 1:33:53 PM

DougD

USA

10329 posts since 12/2/2007

I seem to have Super Slinkies on my Les Paul (the guitar of choice for old time music around here IMHO), which I'm thinking about changing. Also that guitar is very heavy compared to a violin, which is a definite disadvantage!

Edited by - DougD on 08/28/2021 13:37:45

Aug 28, 2021 - 2:23:32 PM

5486 posts since 9/26/2008

Which one is the green (chartreuse?) package? Regular Slinky? Those were my electric guitar string of choice.

Ed, a hollowed body and the right [amp gain:guitar proximity] ratio will do wonders towards controlled, musical sustain. But you probably already know that wink

Agreed about electric and violin comparisons. One can produce some surprisingly guitarlike sounds with the violin. 

Edited by - ChickenMan on 08/28/2021 14:23:55

Aug 28, 2021 - 4:13:41 PM
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DougD

USA

10329 posts since 12/2/2007

Yeah, chartreuse are the regulars, the supers are pink.
I also have a Fender Blues junior tube amp, which I've really hardly used. But in a run of a theater show we used it, and my friend Ed played an old full body Gibson electric through it and it sounded great!

Edited by - DougD on 08/28/2021 16:16:03

Aug 28, 2021 - 4:21:20 PM

1904 posts since 12/11/2008

DougD -- Just grip the Les Paul under your chin. Easy! Natural!

ChickenMan -- Don't make me search down the Les Paul so I can see what it's strung with, but I generally used to use Regular Slinkies with all my solid-bodied electrics. In any case, my thoroughly relic-ed Fender Custom Shop"Pre-CBS" Tele still delivers twang to die for.

And oh yes. For a while I had a full-on f-holed, hollow-bodied jazzer. It was a cheap, Far Eastern knockoff but it had a nice big tone and a superb neck. It also fed back like crazy. I actually had to play it outdoors to be able to play it at any decent volume.

Finally, I got to say that once I got my fiddle it was essentially g'bye to my attraction to electric guitar.

Aug 28, 2021 - 4:57:37 PM

2465 posts since 10/22/2007

quote:
Originally posted by ChickenMan Agreed about electric and violin comparisons. One can produce some surprisingly guitarlike sounds with the violin. 

I always say, that electric guitar player wishes he could sound like a fiddle. The few that can play their own bass line behind their riff, are another story.

Aug 28, 2021 - 7:10:36 PM
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bsed

USA

4181 posts since 6/23/2007

Many reasons. But the 2 that came quickest to my mind are

* Personal accomplishment. Hard to believe I've arrived at such a level of competency as I have. Am I good? I ain't saying. That's for you to say. But I can claim that anything I want to learn, I can learn. And this music I play is really interesting and beautiful stuff.

* Friends I've made. I can count a lot of them that I would only have made because I play music. If I didn't have musician friends, I'd barely have any at all. 

Aug 28, 2021 - 7:35:07 PM

5486 posts since 9/26/2008

quote:
Originally posted by bsed

* Friends I've made. I can count a lot of them that I would only have made because I play music. If I didn't have musician friends, I'd barely have any at all. 


Same here. In fact the few I have that aren't musicians are people I met through my job. 

Aug 29, 2021 - 12:20:36 PM

292 posts since 4/15/2019

I had an original Les Paul electric I bought in 1959. Hear they are worth a pretty penny now.

Aug 29, 2021 - 12:42:57 PM

DougD

USA

10329 posts since 12/2/2007

Yes, I'd say so! Mine is a '78, far out of the classic years, but I think its still worth more than I bought it for (used).

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