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Jun 28, 2021 - 9:06:10 AM
12314 posts since 9/23/2009

Yeah, where in the world IS the world? Sometimes i look at this little Chromebook sitting on my lap and I think...there's a big, big part of my world right in there in that little piece of plastic! Kinda scary.  Time to make lunch.

Edited by - groundhogpeggy on 06/28/2021 09:06:56

Jun 29, 2021 - 11:54:10 AM

RichJ

USA

534 posts since 8/6/2013

Gee thanks Peggy. Now you got me all riled up and worried and you just ran off to make lunch. Gonna' be sittin' on pins and needles all day.

Jun 29, 2021 - 1:33:36 PM

12314 posts since 9/23/2009

Lol...maybe a good time for everybody to just have lunch, hey? Nothin' but lunch...forget everything else.

Jun 29, 2021 - 4:30:33 PM
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WyoBob

USA

286 posts since 5/16/2019

"Kinda scary"?    Maybe not.   Just think. You can interact with lots of different folks and, if they bug you, you can "disappear" them.  

You can visit anywhere in the world and see amazing things without leaving your house.   I've been to Yellowstone 4 or 5 times.   I won't be going again due to the abundance of incredibly strange and odd people.  Many with a death wish, it seems.   I can look at old photos of my visits with my family and my fly fishing adventures with friends in the area.   No need to ever go there again.  I can drive up into the Bighorn's like I did today and walk around, smell pine and --- see no one.

You can visit with people who have the same interests as you do online and, if you're as talented as you are, can share things that will help others on there way to the goal of playing as well as you do.   I can play along on my fiddle with some really good, old time musician's.   I have 30-40 recordings of the O.T. group I get to play with and have been slowing down and looping and learning some new tunes.    Once a week, I get to play my banjo, live, with this group.  (Haven't gotten the nerve to mention that I can "kind of play" the fiddle, too.)

TV got you down?   The only TV I watch is shows that I've got on my DVR.   Programs that I enjoy that I can fast forward through the commercials on.  You know the shows I'm talking about (even though I'm sure you're much younger than I am).   Perry Mason, Gunsmoke, Bones, Carol Burnett (mainly for the Tim Conway/Harvey Korman episodes, Antiques Roadshow, "How It's Made", The Addams Family.   Old movies, to many to mention.    I haven't been to a movie theater in 15-20 years.

I've pretty much perfected being a hermit and the Covid isolation wasn't much of a problem for me.   I've spent a lot of time in the basement playing my fiddle and that keeps me happily occupied.  Our youngest daughter and her husband and our 4 year old grandson are coming to Buffalo on Friday and we have several adventures planned.   Floating pine cones down the irrigation ditch up in the foot hills is a favorite of grandson Alex.

Saturday, I got to play with my old time friends at our local, Living History Days.


Jun 29, 2021 - 6:55:06 PM

12314 posts since 9/23/2009

Good points, Bob. Yes, the little piece of plastic on my lap has allowed all those nice things you mentioned. I've been a hermit since we moved up to this area...not by choice...I'm just too weird for this place where we are. I guess when the net came along I got out into the world for a change, but sometimes I miss being in real life insteada just on the plastic virtual lifeline...lol...so to speak. It seems weird...combine that with the other-worldliness, sci-fi atmosphere covid brought, now all of our birds are sick and dying of something and we're supposed to stop feeding them so they can socially distance and hopefully pull through, the dying trees all around here...I don't know...real life almost seems more like imagined memories to me these days, and the lap plastic chromebook seems more like real life...sometimes when I think back it seems like none of the real events, people, or places really ever existed...just the plastic virtual here-and-now, just the internet...lol. Just weird.  I tell my grandson about other places, other times, other people, other ways, and I feel like none of it ever really existed...just this...just what's in cyberspace is all...lol.  It's just weird.  I thought I needed lunch, but I think maybe more time in the real world would be better than lunch...although, gotta say, lunch was good...I mean, ain't too many real or cyber people either one who can match my fried chicken and collard greens.  That was pretty real!  Nice photos!

Edited by - groundhogpeggy on 06/29/2021 19:03:26

Jun 30, 2021 - 5:46:11 AM
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5363 posts since 9/26/2008

Sounds like you've figured out we're living in a simulation, like The Matrix movie smiley

"They" are probably checking your coding right now, trying to fix the glitch that allows you to see the truth.

I had collard greens and onions on Saturday at a friend's house - delish! 

Edited by - ChickenMan on 06/30/2021 05:46:24

Jun 30, 2021 - 7:13:19 AM
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454 posts since 6/11/2019

I thought it all depended on what color pill you chose...

Peggy, you must live north of the "Lunch" vs. "Dinner" line. Though even my use of the word dinner for the 2nd meal has just about been learned out, with all those years in the service around other people.

Interesting philosophic subject. Except for reading here, I've found myself checking out of society (beyond my local) and the world lately, because of the exponential rise of unpleasantness. No TV except Andy. I don't keep track of news. It's almost like we're going backward in time. I didn't know about dying birds or trees--the nature of things looks the same to me, ticks came on time, deer flies came on time, horseflies are about here. June thunderstorm knocked down the corn like always. Have not yet found a chickensnake in the coop; that's abnormal--always in June, but I still have today I guess.

Like Bob said, we've reached the point that the "off position" is a great thing.

I love collards--I throw in some fatback or bacon grease...make cornbread and a good ol' Vidalia onion on the side...

Edited by - Flat_the_3rd_n7th on 06/30/2021 07:14:06

Jun 30, 2021 - 7:30:48 AM

454 posts since 6/11/2019

Regarding trees dying, besides the older die outs of the chestnut, balsam and elm, I'll say I am aware of some recent pestilences on the hemlocks, dogwoods and ash. Non-native borers and fungus. Why is it always our pretty trees?

Jun 30, 2021 - 8:40:28 AM

12314 posts since 9/23/2009

Yeah...the scrub pines and some other type pine are all dead, the ash trees are dead...the birds are dying of some mysterious something-or-other, it's way too hot...living in that simulation keeps us from being aware...lol...as Chickenman says...I'm not a movie person, but I get it...there's a glitch allowing me to suddenly notice reality...lol. Kinda like eating that apple...then you suddenly notice there's good and evil...uh-oh...

Well yeah we have breakfast, lunch, supper...I thought that was old fashioned because my daughter and family always laugh when I say "supper..." lol... we never said "dinner" unless it was some special thing...Christmas Dinner, Easter Dinner...etc. But to babies or dogs...any meal they ever eat is called "dinner." Different people call it different things, I guess, but... Why is "dinero" money in Spanish, when it should be a meal?

Jun 30, 2021 - 8:55:29 AM
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12314 posts since 9/23/2009

Oh hey...Chickenman was right...my chromebook wants me to update...lol...ok, it discovered the glitch that gave me a glimpse of forbidden reality.

Jun 30, 2021 - 1:02:39 PM
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270 posts since 4/15/2019

I,d like to know where in the world is the world I used to know? I still eat dinner and supper! I still like taking a drive on Sunday afternoons! I still enjoy going on picnics! I still like sitting on the front porch visiting with old friends. Where is that world today?

Jun 30, 2021 - 1:11:45 PM
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2392 posts since 10/22/2007

If you've shelled corn or bailed hay you have Breakfast, lunch (about 10:00), Dinner at noon, lunch (about 3:00), then home for Supper at 6:00.
That's all mechanized now. Very few pick corn in the ear, or bail little square bails. You can't find the labor to do such things. Of course they lift weights in a gym, but lifting weight for the purpose of animal husbandry is well, it wouldn't surprise me if it were uninsurable, thus making it not possible.

Jun 30, 2021 - 1:47:49 PM
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12314 posts since 9/23/2009

Well yeah, but don't we sound like a bunch of old people whining about the past? lol...hmmm...well but anyway, all the places I lived, especially the ones I really loved, and the life styles there I loved, the people, etc., have all been destroyed off the face of the earth...most of the people have died or moved far away...we came up here for jobs, insurance, a future, etc., and left all of that which was eventually destroyed for one reason or another...all, of course related to money. Sometimes it seems to me none of it ever really existed at all...we didn't have cameras or cell phones to record the past...it's just gone now...whatever is left in our memories.

Jun 30, 2021 - 1:51:10 PM
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454 posts since 6/11/2019

Hey, this is turning into a pretty good geezer thread. I'm 57, but I did my share of time walking behind the truck loading square bales by hand. Also fed it back out by hand later in the winter. We kids used to make forts with the bales in the barn complete with tunnels. I'm glad I can handle round bales with a tractor now, don't miss those square bales.

Used to have to stay up all night shucking and shelling corn by hand, too. I got to miss school, so I thought it was alright. And then we'd take it to a mill and have them custom grind it. The field corn they would mix in some molasses to make sweet feed for the stock.

I've seen pictures of men in the field picking and shucking, then throwing it in the wagon, one that doesn't stop. One feller was so fast at it that one time he accidently shucked himself right out of his own shoes and threw hisself in the wagon.

Jun 30, 2021 - 2:57:31 PM
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270 posts since 4/15/2019

I have spent many a hot day behind a hay baler loading wagons! Also picked and shucked corn by hand. As a kid we built tunnels of straw in the hay mow. Filled silos with corn silage. Also filled corn cribs with eared corn! Just don't fit in with this modern world. About ready to hang it all up after 78 yrs!

Jun 30, 2021 - 4:12:07 PM
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WyoBob

USA

286 posts since 5/16/2019

quote:
Originally posted by old cowboy

I have spent many a hot day behind a hay baler loading wagons! Also picked and shucked corn by hand. As a kid we built tunnels of straw in the hay mow. Filled silos with corn silage. Also filled corn cribs with eared corn! Just don't fit in with this modern world. About ready to hang it all up after 78 yrs!


We moved to Lexington, NE in 1962 to run the family feedlot.   At that time, evidently a lot of folks stored eared corn and shelled it later so there was a large corn cob supply.  I don't know.  I was 15 years old and had spent my life in Kansas City.  Everything was really new to me so I thought that was normal to bed with cobs.   The old part of the feedlot had feed bunks inside the pens and most of those pens had barns or sheds.   When the cattle were close to being ready to sell, we moved the cattle from the pens with fence line bunks up to those pens.   Grandad thought the lower height feed bunks in those pens made the cattle look bigger and, with the cobs, they were very clean.

We bedded the barns with corn cobs and the cattle loved to lay on the cobs.   Thousands of tons of cobs over the years were hauled and spread in the barns/shed using several of the smaller manure trucks we had.   This kept the cattle clean.  In other words, they had no "mud" on them  (well, it wasn't mud, you know) and the packer buyers would pay a premium if the cattle were clean.  No, 15 lb. mud balls on their tails not to mention on the rest of the animal.  The packers didn't like paying for "mud" weight.   The manure trucks had "live bottoms" (conveyer's) and we'd back the trucks into the sheds and spread cobs for bedding.

BTW, the pens with inside bunks were fed via a double team of horses pulling a "scoop wagon".   Two men per wagon (and we had two wagons) and each team scooped 11 tons of feed every day.   I was on a scoop wagon for four summers and it dang near killed me the first part of the summer.   When school started in the fall, I was in pretty good shape!  Being a "green" city boy, I was taught how to harness a team and I did that for four years.  The old hands liked having a kid to do their work.

While at college at UNL, all four of the draft horses died.   Evidently, one of the hired hands got tired of scooping and relied on poison to solve the problem.  We never found out who did it but, after that, the inside bunks were fed via feed truck.  And, I was never in as good of physical condition after that!  I think I could probably still harness a team.   Fortunately, I no longer have to do it!

After scooping feed, we'd go out to the hay field and load 4 or 5 loads of 80 lb. bales out of the stack on the long bed truck and haul the alfalfa to the grinding shed.  We were at around 8,000 head capacity at that time and those cattle sure seem to eat a lot of hay.   As we expanded to 10,000 head, we hired the hay hauling to a private contractor.  (Thank goodness).

Jun 30, 2021 - 6:50:42 PM

12314 posts since 9/23/2009

I always did love hard work outside. Not crazy about inside work...dry wall, plumbing, flooring, etc. I hate that kinda work and seems like we've had to do that for the past 30 years because nobody else could afford it or were able to do it for themselves...I'd like to "retire" (we just do it for free, so, not really retire but just stop, for heaven's sake) from that and get a little bit of flat acreage and have a great big garden, some chickens, a pond, etc. Don't know if we could ever get off the steep little landslide of a postage stamp right in the middle of chaos we're in now...I mean, it's county, you can have livestock or shoot guns (we never would here, too close to neighbors, but they shoot everywhere, like idiots), or whatever...we had goats but it was torture carrying the hay and feed sacks down our steep and slick hillside to the shed...when we had chickens and goats here, i usually fell down the hill carrying something bulky almost everyday...lol...it's either muddy, icy, slick from being so dry on the steep slope, etc. I hope somehow we can get out of this place, away from all these thugs and drug dealers and get back out somewhere where we could relax and have even just an acre or two of nice land somewhere. I'd be more than happy to put up a 12 x 60 trailer and spend the rest of my life there...don't need a fancy house, just a nice area where we could relax and not be so stressed.  I keep hoping I'll just win some lottery or something...lol..of course, since I don't buy tickets...well...ain't gonna happen, now, is it?

Edited by - groundhogpeggy on 06/30/2021 18:53:25

Jun 30, 2021 - 7:36:33 PM

454 posts since 6/11/2019

quote:
Originally posted by groundhogpeggy

I always did love hard work outside. Not crazy about inside work...dry wall, plumbing, flooring, etc. I hate that kinda work and seems like we've had to do that for the past 30 years because nobody else could afford it or were able to do it for themselves...I'd like to "retire" (we just do it for free, so, not really retire but just stop, for heaven's sake) from that and get a little bit of flat acreage and have a great big garden, some chickens, a pond, etc. Don't know if we could ever get off the steep little landslide of a postage stamp right in the middle of chaos we're in now...I mean, it's county, you can have livestock or shoot guns (we never would here, too close to neighbors, but they shoot everywhere, like idiots), or whatever...we had goats but it was torture carrying the hay and feed sacks down our steep and slick hillside to the shed...when we had chickens and goats here, i usually fell down the hill carrying something bulky almost everyday...lol...it's either muddy, icy, slick from being so dry on the steep slope, etc. I hope somehow we can get out of this place, away from all these thugs and drug dealers and get back out somewhere where we could relax and have even just an acre or two of nice land somewhere. I'd be more than happy to put up a 12 x 60 trailer and spend the rest of my life there...don't need a fancy house, just a nice area where we could relax and not be so stressed.  I keep hoping I'll just win some lottery or something...lol..of course, since I don't buy tickets...well...ain't gonna happen, now, is it?


Sounds like you need to move back to Pineville...

I wouldn't mind living around there myself--I don't think the "slickers" have discovered it yet...oops

Jun 30, 2021 - 7:53:34 PM

12314 posts since 9/23/2009

uh-oh...too late now...lol. Yes, I'd love to go back!

Jul 1, 2021 - 9:36:13 AM

270 posts since 4/15/2019

WyoBob. There was no such thing as a combine that picked and shelled the corn back in our time! It was all picked with a cornpicker pulled behind a tractor. You took it to the local elevator and they shelled it and either piled the cobs out back or some had a brick cob burner they used. They would give the cobs to the farmers to use for bedding just to be rid of them. Some also used the cobs to fuel their heating stoves. We ground all of our cattle feed ourselves. We had our own hammer mill as they were called. Dad preferred to grind the ear corn on the cob. The cobs provided roughage for the cattle. We too had the feed bunks in the finishing pens as you said. We used to scoop the manure from these lots with a scoop shovel. We wore what we called gum boots that came up to our knees. The manure on theses lots was about the consistency of thin gravy! Try to get a teenager to do that today! Nothing worked up an appetite like doing this all day! My Dad taught me how to harness and saddle a horse. What I wouldn't give to spend another day with him!

Jul 2, 2021 - 4:03:49 AM

12314 posts since 9/23/2009

Our cows ate grass and hay...lol...mainly. We fed them a few scoops of corn when we were going to eat the cow in question...the others were auctioned. I don't think I could do that at this point...lol...can't kill animals anymore. The last time I killed a catfish I cried...it tasted good, but I just can't do that anymore. Gonna have to just kill beans and cornbread I guess.

Jul 2, 2021 - 4:28:27 PM

WyoBob

USA

286 posts since 5/16/2019

quote:
Originally posted by old cowboy

WyoBob. There was no such thing as a combine that picked and shelled the corn back in our time! It was all picked with a cornpicker pulled behind a tractor.

<snipped>

What I wouldn't give to spend another day with him!


All of the corn we raised on our farmland (about 640 acres) went to the silage pile.  (for those non-ag folks, the whole corn plant is chopped up and put into a pile and packed within an inch of it's life where the corn "cooks"   "ferments")   We bought the majority of our ensilage supply from local farmers.  One day, we had 22 trucks dumping at the pit and I was piling silage with a 950 Cat front end loader as fast as I could.   I loved running that that machine.   We cut and piled silage for about a month and put up around 15,000 tons of corn silage.

Yeah, I hear you about our dad's.   I guess the next best thing is to reminisce with other, old agriculture guys about the old days.  There were some hard times and glorious times. 

My favorite part of my time on earth was getting to know a lot of the "Greatest Generation".   And growing up with the people of the era with their work ethic and values.

Jul 3, 2021 - 5:07:12 AM
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270 posts since 4/15/2019

I hear you Bob about the greatest generation! Growing up around these men, I liked nothing better than just being with them and listening to them talk. We had an older man from west Virginia working for us. I would get out early in the mornings to find him in one of the barns and sit with him as he smoked is strong old pipe and tell me about his moon shining exploits! These kind of memories make it hard to relate to this cockeyed world we live in today!

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