Banjo Hangout Logo
Banjo Hangout Logo

Premier Sponsors

151
Fiddle Lovers Online


Jun 19, 2021 - 1:57:09 PM
likes this
2004 posts since 8/27/2008

Rosa String Works

I just recently came upon this site, maybe from a comment here, not sure. I can't stop watching the videos on the one hand, as the guy is improvising repair solutions in real time and I enjoy figuring out what I would do while he's doing it. But he makes me nervous and I wouldn't ever give him an instrument to work on. He smears TiteBond in all his joints, not ever thinking of hide glue apparently. He does some real kooky things and doesn't apparently care how much his repairs match the original instrument. Sometimes he really doesn't seem to know what he's talking about, but he plows on through and makes the repair by the end. It's like the other end of the scale from watching Davide Sora videos in that it's informative, but in an entirely different way.

He's obviously having a good time though. Check out the aptly titled "fiddle fiasco".

Jun 19, 2021 - 9:07:45 PM

46davis

USA

47 posts since 3/16/2021

This is hilarious and definitely entertaining. The fact of the matter is that fretted instruments are routinely made and repaired with aliphatic glues. We look at the process and cringe, but their techniques are different from ours and they seem to work. Guitars, as they say in California, are 'whole different head, man.'

I know of one guy who makes fiddles with Titebond. He says that if they ever need to be taken apart it can be done with hot vinegar. I hope I never have to try.

Jun 20, 2021 - 9:15:50 PM

2004 posts since 8/27/2008

quote:
Originally posted by 46davis'

I know of one guy who makes fiddles with Titebond. He says that if they ever need to be taken apart it can be done with hot vinegar. I hope I never have to try.

Yes, I use Titebond myself in many cases, but it wouldn't be right on a fiddle to me. At least not anywhere that another repair guy might possibly come in contact with. Never tried vinegar, but I think I've heard it's effective for hide glue too?

Jun 21, 2021 - 9:02:29 AM

46davis

USA

47 posts since 3/16/2021

quote:
Originally posted by Brian Wood
quote:
Originally posted by 46davis'

I know of one guy who makes fiddles with Titebond. He says that if they ever need to be taken apart it can be done with hot vinegar. I hope I never have to try.

Yes, I use Titebond myself in many cases, but it wouldn't be right on a fiddle to me. At least not anywhere that another repair guy might possibly come in contact with. Never tried vinegar, but I think I've heard it's effective for hide glue too?


Never used hot vinegar on hide glue. Always found water and time to be adequate, even for neck separations.

Jun 21, 2021 - 2:20:10 PM

5620 posts since 7/1/2007

This video is a great example of work by competent luthiers; although I don't agree with the cheek patch, it is done pretty well. It's also a wonderful visual tutorial on what makes Mittenwald violins "different", and how to tell them apart from work from other areas, although Mirecourt violins have some similarities. Notice how deftly she takes the top off the fiddle. That used to take me a long time until I watched Vlad Logashev open one in almost no time with no damage.

Rosa's videos make me cringe. He seems to have never had any sort of training, and tends to do things the hard way. He's pretty inventive, but seems to wish to remain pridefully ignorant of "accepted practice", although I'll grant, he seems to keep his planes sharp. But turning pegs down on a lathe???? Even if you have a magically calibrated eyeball, the time he would save with a proper peg shaver on just one set of pegs would pay for the tool at shop rates.

Jun 21, 2021 - 2:43:12 PM
likes this

2004 posts since 8/27/2008

You may have put the wrong link in. It looks like someone demonstrating one of your fiddles and not a demonstration of luthiers working (which I'd watch). Nice looking fiddle though.

Jun 21, 2021 - 2:53:43 PM

5620 posts since 7/1/2007

Can't go back and edit now! This is the proper link. I got spoiled by being able to test links before posting, and I'm  a terrible clerk. The video is definitely wort watching if you're interested in "old school" luthiery.

Edited by - KCFiddles on 06/21/2021 14:59:52

Jun 21, 2021 - 4:12:43 PM

2004 posts since 8/27/2008

quote:
Originally posted by KCFiddles

This video is a great example of work by competent luthiers; although I don't agree with the cheek patch, it is done pretty well.


Yes, interesting. Thanks. But why not put the cheek patch on the inside and save the outside cosmetics, I wonder?

Jun 21, 2021 - 4:49:02 PM

5620 posts since 7/1/2007

quote:
Originally posted by Brian Wood
quote:
Originally posted by KCFiddles

This video is a great example of work by competent luthiers; although I don't agree with the cheek patch, it is done pretty well.


Yes, interesting. Thanks. But why not put the cheek patch on the inside and save the outside cosmetics, I wonder?


I agree. I didn't watch closely enough, because my first choice is a spiral bushing unless there's a better reason, but those cheek patches are traditional, and some luthiers are still bound by old school ways. Seems to make more sense to me to put the patch on the inside, but I didn't take a good look at the "before". Still, the overall workmanship seems pretty good, and I was kinda trippin on the Mittenwald construction, with the inletted linings and the one-piece lower bouts, and the corner blocks that are long on the upper and lower bouts, and short on the c-bouts.  I've got a really nice Chicago fiddle that has a pin through the neck block that I've never seen before. That sort of thing piques my curiosity.

Hangout Network Help

View All Topics  |  View Categories

0.109375