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Jun 17, 2021 - 2:47:40 PM
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1407 posts since 7/26/2015

What do y'all think of this arrangement of "Soldier's Joy?" I've attached sheet music in addition to pasting a link to an audio recording. I mostly patterned it after Tommy Jarrell, but after listening to it, I think it turned out quite different from his version. fiddlehangout.com/myhangout/me...archived=


Edited by - soppinthegravy on 06/17/2021 14:49:44

Jun 17, 2021 - 3:13:32 PM
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2339 posts since 10/22/2007

I hear AABB. Seems common enough.

Jun 17, 2021 - 4:50:37 PM
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DougD

USA

10171 posts since 12/2/2007

For anyone interested, here's the actual Tommy Jarrell playing "Soldier's Joy." The three repeated notes at the end of sections recall its origins as a hornpipe. youtu.be/IRWijAbyEt8

Jun 17, 2021 - 5:13:53 PM

1407 posts since 7/26/2015

I didn't realize it started out as a hornpipe. I really like his version of it. He gives those three notes some drive, vs. other people playing them sort of stately. I can't explain it. I noticed that Brad Leftwich's book lists "Love Somebody" as an alternate title. I learned that one as a different tune, which some people call "Too Young to Marry". I'm used to the hornpipey sound at the end of that tune, but not "Soldier's Joy". I wonder if Tommy ever played that tune. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cJTXAUCNu8U 
quote:
Originally posted by DougD

For anyone interested, here's the actual Tommy Jarrell playing "Soldier's Joy." The three repeated notes at the end of sections recall its origins as a hornpipe. youtu.be/IRWijAbyEt8


Edited by - soppinthegravy on 06/17/2021 17:28:26

Jun 17, 2021 - 6:58:16 PM

DougD

USA

10171 posts since 12/2/2007

"Soldier's Joy" is Scottish in origin, so I would think it was a reel, which is how I think of it. Supposedly it was first published in the late 18th century but I can't find an example. Its grouped with the hornpipes in O'Neill's and its in the back of Ryan's with the "contra dances," with the figures.
Those final three notes are characteristic of hornpipes though, and you're right Tommy states them plainly.
Also, those arpeggiated parts in the older versions are reminiscent of what you find in "Durang's Hornpipe," or even "Fisher's."

Edited by - DougD on 06/17/2021 19:05:47

Jun 18, 2021 - 10:58:45 AM
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12160 posts since 9/23/2009
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Well I tried to tell yu-uns over on the soundoff forum...lol...it's a hornpipey thing but there's words and there's the singable version...but, just like all the presidents and all the president's men, etc., nobody ever listens to what an ol' groundhog whines about...lol.

Jun 18, 2021 - 5:14:01 PM

2339 posts since 10/22/2007

Whatever happened to the idea that Soldier's Joy was a derivative of the King's Head Reel?

https://tunearch.org/wiki/Annotation:King%27s_Head_(1)_(The)

Edited by - farmerjones on 06/18/2021 17:17:05

Jun 19, 2021 - 9:20:32 AM
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DougD

USA

10171 posts since 12/2/2007

What happened to that "idea" was that it never existed, AFAIK. Samuel Bayard says in his notes to the notation you linked to that "This will be recognized as a version of 'The Soldier's Joy,' a tune which most folk fiddlers know" and that Mrs. Armstrong's title was common n Pennsylvania.
This tune was supposedly first published in 1778, although I saw a reference to an earlier date of 1756 - always as "Soldier's Joy," just as it is in "Ryan's" and "O'Neill's." I don't think your link suggests anything else, despite a lot of extraneous info about taverns, which reminds me of the old question - "How far is the King's head in?" which I take to be a political, rather than geographic query.

Jun 19, 2021 - 11:01:49 AM

1407 posts since 7/26/2015

Speaking of odd titles for it, I always heard that an alternate title was "Payday in the Army", but I don't know of anybody who actually grew up calling it that.
quote:
Originally posted by DougD

What happened to that "idea" was that it never existed, AFAIK. Samuel Bayard says in his notes to the notation you linked to that "This will be recognized as a version of 'The Soldier's Joy,' a tune which most folk fiddlers know" and that Mrs. Armstrong's title was common n Pennsylvania.
This tune was supposedly first published in 1778, although I saw a reference to an earlier date of 1756 - always as "Soldier's Joy," just as it is in "Ryan's" and "O'Neill's." I don't think your link suggests anything else, despite a lot of extraneous info about taverns, which reminds me of the old question - "How far is the King's head in?" which I take to be a political, rather than geographic query.


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