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May 28, 2021 - 1:50:06 PM
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boxbow

USA

2687 posts since 2/3/2011

This is pure curiosity on my part. Is the 30:1 ratio of a peg reaming tool length:radius or length:diameter? The latter would give the slope off the center axis, which makes sense, but so does the simplicity of the former. That's why it came up in my otherwise unoccupied head.

May 28, 2021 - 2:49:34 PM

981 posts since 6/26/2007

Length:diameter. That's a lot easier to measure and express.

May 28, 2021 - 3:27:44 PM

46davis

USA

47 posts since 3/16/2021

As CaptainHook said. Cellos may have a 1:20 ration peg and reamers are available for them.

My experience has been don't skimp on the quality of the reamer. If you go cheap on everything else, at least go first class on this one. You do so much with the reamer, such as setting the blade angle of your peg shaver, carefully cleaning out old peg holes and cleaning out varnish on your new makes. I've had my Herdim for 30+ years and never needs sharpening.

May 29, 2021 - 4:50:55 AM
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boxbow

USA

2687 posts since 2/3/2011

Thanks. And now, back to your regularly scheduled web surfing.

May 29, 2021 - 7:02:48 AM
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5620 posts since 7/1/2007

The only reason I'm piping up here is because someone may remember this information or it may turn up on Google in the future. Cello pegs typically have a 1:25 taper. Many old violins, from before the 1920s also have 1:25 taper, so holes may have to be re-reamed or pegs have to be custom tapered to fit. Hence the availability of adjustable peg shapers. I don't worry about it with trade violins, but it's something to be aware of with valuable antiques, where preservation of original wood is paramount. You can buy 1:25 violin/ lute reamers still. (I don't have one, but can borrow. Same with adjustable peg shaper.)

Also, reamers, even good ones, do wear out if they get used every day, as in a busy shop, but they do last a good while. They can be honed, but sometimes they reach a point where they need replaced. I keep my old one for rough work, like making bushings or reaming peg holes on new instruments, and try to remember to use the newer one for finish work.

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