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Jan 15, 2021 - 4:38:31 PM
639 posts since 8/10/2017

I have a wolf. I had never heard of that before but I have one. Is there a DIY solution or do I have to buy one of those things to screw onto my string?

Jan 15, 2021 - 4:44:05 PM

294 posts since 1/5/2009

I think you should try to isolate the wolf first.
By placing your finger on the points of contact of the string affected, while playing that string.
You will hear the wolf stop when you touch the problem area. After you found where the wolf is coming from, is when you can determine what do do next.

Jan 15, 2021 - 6:19:40 PM
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2196 posts since 10/22/2007

What did you do different? Is it more pronounced with new strings? What changed?
I had one on a terribly inexpensive violin. My solution was to jettison, but had other violins. (whole 'nother story)

Edited by - farmerjones on 01/15/2021 18:20:22

Jan 15, 2021 - 7:08:47 PM

309 posts since 3/1/2020

If you have a wolf on your violin, the sound post probably needs to be adjusted (or replaced).

There are some devices you can use, but they don't really address the problem. You'll get much better results by having the setup checked out by your luthier.

Edited by - The Violin Beautiful on 01/15/2021 19:11:22

Jan 15, 2021 - 11:15:27 PM

banjopaolo

Italy

135 posts since 9/14/2010

On which string and on which note of the string the wolf is?

Jan 17, 2021 - 9:24:42 AM

639 posts since 8/10/2017

It is when I play a G on the E string. I only recently noticed it because I have been taking lessons and now I can play in tune, but unfortunately that is one note I can't play in tune very well. It just sounds terrible. I asked my teacher what I'm doing wrong and she said I should try to find where my fiddle is opening up and needs to be glued back together. I found the spot and my friend glued it back together (he regularly fixes up old fiddles) but the problem note is still there and she described it as a "wolf".

Jan 17, 2021 - 9:29:15 AM

294 posts since 1/5/2009

Then that means there is another area that has come loose. Lightly tapping the instrument around the sides you should be able to hear the difference in the sound.

Jan 17, 2021 - 10:46:26 AM
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309 posts since 3/1/2020

Wolves usually don’t come from open seams. The open seam noise is different, more of a buzz.

A wolf comes from an unwanted overtone fighting against the fundamental. It can be eliminated by changes to the setup.

Are you certain that it’s a wolf and not a buzz? I ask because the spot you mentioned is a very common spot for strings to buzz against the fingerboard if the scoop or the nut height aren’t right.

Jan 17, 2021 - 4:11 PM
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WyoBob

USA

196 posts since 5/16/2019

quote:
Originally posted by The Violin Beautiful


Are you certain that it’s a wolf and not a buzz? I ask because the spot you mentioned is a very common spot for strings to buzz against the fingerboard if the scoop or the nut height aren’t right.


Would a piece of paper under the string to raise the action at the nut help with trying to find the problem?

Jan 17, 2021 - 5:38:20 PM

2196 posts since 10/22/2007

I know a hard soundpost dimples software spruce tops/bottom plates, but could a separation be enough for a soundpost to walk out of place? I spose it depends on how tight the post was fitted. I've heard of posts falling over when all the strings are removed.
IOW, I think Max's 1st assessment is pretty close. I hate to say it but I'd take it to a luthier, If it were me. I draw the line at glue pots, and hide glue.

Edited by - farmerjones on 01/17/2021 17:39:48

Jan 17, 2021 - 5:59:38 PM

639 posts since 8/10/2017

My friend fixed it just the other day. He didn't find anymore openings. Only a small bit could be moved so I don't think it would be enough to move a sound post.

It's not a buzz, it's more like the note won't play without a significant amount of additional pressure.

Could I just wrap some tape or rubberbands or something else homemade around the string between the bridge and the tail piece or do you need to add weight? The things I have seen online look heavy.

Jan 17, 2021 - 6:05:20 PM

294 posts since 1/5/2009

Ok then it is the setup. Check the clearance of the strings above the fingerboard. Check to make sure the bridge is standing up, ( not leaning either direction). Check to insure the bridge is centered and in the correct position.

Jan 17, 2021 - 7:29:44 PM

309 posts since 3/1/2020

quote:
Originally posted by sbhikes2

My friend fixed it just the other day. He didn't find anymore openings. Only a small bit could be moved so I don't think it would be enough to move a sound post.

It's not a buzz, it's more like the note won't play without a significant amount of additional pressure.

Could I just wrap some tape or rubberbands or something else homemade around the string between the bridge and the tail piece or do you need to add weight? The things I have seen online look heavy.


Your description of having to use extra pressure to get through the problem is consistent with a wolf; I asked about the fingerboard just to rule that out.

Wolf eliminators that fit on a string work by adding mass to the string and dampening the overtone series. There are other kinds that can be attached to the top (like the Krentz).

Wolves are quite common on cellos and only show up rarely on violas. Violins should not have them--if one shows up, there's something wrong. You can add mass to the string to move the wolf somewhere else, but it doesn't get to the bottom of the matter. Getting it properly sorted out will not only eliminate the need for extra hardware but will also help the instrument perform better across the board.

Jan 18, 2021 - 10:59:31 AM

639 posts since 8/10/2017

Other notes are buzzing really bad. I just tried the chromatic scale for the first time. Very buzzy.

Jan 18, 2021 - 11:12:07 AM

Swing

USA

1990 posts since 6/26/2007

If the note won't play then that is a strong indicator of the sound post being in the the wrong place... any competent luthier could fix the problem quickly... a little TLC goes a long way on a fiddle

Play Happy

Swing

Jan 18, 2021 - 12:17:01 PM

DougD

USA

9971 posts since 12/2/2007

Sounds like an open seam or crack to me, but I'm not a luthier. You should take it to soneone who is (a luthier).

Jan 18, 2021 - 3:00:46 PM

639 posts since 8/10/2017

I'll try to find one. The only one I know is retired. My friend just buys old fiddles and fixes them.

Jan 18, 2021 - 4:06:55 PM

DougD

USA

9971 posts since 12/2/2007

Your jam pals, or certainly your teacher, probably know someone.

Jan 18, 2021 - 11:40:08 PM
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639 posts since 8/10/2017

One of the notes buzzed so loud it sounded like the buzz was happening inside. My fiddle is fine playing in G, D, A, C tunes but not good for fancy violin stuff.

Jan 19, 2021 - 8:58:56 AM

309 posts since 3/1/2020

quote:
Originally posted by sbhikes2

One of the notes buzzed so loud it sounded like the buzz was happening inside. My fiddle is fine playing in G, D, A, C tunes but not good for fancy violin stuff.


Something odd is going on. It seems like the issues keep changing. Your issue on one note sounded more like a wolf, but what you're describing now sounds more like a fingerboard or nut issue (assuming you're sure there aren't any open seams).

I wish I could see the violin in person. Having it in my hands, I could probably figure it out in a minute. Diagnosing problems is very difficult  in absentia.

Jan 19, 2021 - 5:41:14 PM

639 posts since 8/10/2017

It seems like it is changing only because I played some notes I've never played before.

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