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Oct 29, 2020 - 8:37:09 PM
4 posts since 10/26/2020

Just saw this singing/dancing/fiddling girl on Song of the Mountains and thought she used a Georgia bow on playing the tune Cotton-eyed Joe. Was I right?

Oct 31, 2020 - 8:00:26 AM

235 posts since 3/1/2020

I don’t know what you mean by “Georgia bow,” but I have noticed she uses a baroque bow in some of her videos. It’s an interesting choice; I’ve done the same before for fun. The handling characteristics of the baroque bow do seem to work well with fiddling—after all, many of the truly old tunes were written at a time when that sort of bow was used.

Oct 31, 2020 - 1:21:38 PM

15 posts since 7/18/2020

quote:
Originally posted by donRamon

Just saw this singing/dancing/fiddling girl on Song of the Mountains and thought she used a Georgia bow on playing the tune Cotton-eyed Joe. Was I right?


I presume by that you mean the Georgia Shuffle? I think that might be a common bowing for Cotton Eyed Joe, tough probably not as common as the Nashville Shuffle. Hard for me to detect bowing by listening at full speed. I always need to see it and/or slow it down.

Oct 31, 2020 - 1:22:02 PM

Dragonslayer

Mozambique

263 posts since 9/1/2019

Which videos does she use a baroque bow in? I've wanted to try a baroque bow for a while, but haven't had the opportunity

Oct 31, 2020 - 5:50:08 PM
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4 posts since 10/26/2020

Right Evermore, sorry for the confusion. I meant to say Georgia Shuffle placing the downbow on the offbeat; like the first part in Uncle Pen.

Oct 31, 2020 - 7:03:15 PM

235 posts since 3/1/2020

quote:
Originally posted by Dragonslayer

Which videos does she use a baroque bow in? I've wanted to try a baroque bow for a while, but haven't had the opportunity


Here are a few:

https://youtu.be/3FybVapyAts

https://youtu.be/T6BRK5tCUk0

https://youtu.be/yR8Ga-S7tyQ

 

I'm sure there are plenty more, but these were the first three I found.

The baroque bow changes articulation in a way that compliments the fiddle style. It's worth trying some time. You might be pleasantly surprised! Incidentally, I met a very good Cajun fiddler one day  who was playing a violin with a quasi-baroque setup--synthetic core strings, no chinrest or shoulder rest, modern fingerboard, bridge, tailpiece, and saddle, and baroque bow. It sounded great and he looked quite natural. 

Nov 1, 2020 - 2:36:13 AM

Dragonslayer

Mozambique

263 posts since 9/1/2019

quote:
Originally posted by The Violin Beautiful

Here are a few:

https://youtu.be/3FybVapyAts

https://youtu.be/T6BRK5tCUk0

https://youtu.be/yR8Ga-S7tyQ

 

I'm sure there are plenty more, but these were the first three I found.

The baroque bow changes articulation in a way that compliments the fiddle style. It's worth trying some time. You might be pleasantly surprised! 


I've seen all three of those videos, but I never noticed the bow lol. 

How much do baroque bows cost in comparison to modern ones, and where can you find one? I'm currently playing a Fiddlerman CF, and wouldn't mind an upgrade, and would consider baroque 

Nov 1, 2020 - 6:01:59 AM
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RobBob

USA

2710 posts since 6/26/2007

She is a student of Jim Wood, the great Tennessee fiddler and teacher. Her style is quite complex as result. She uses a Georgia bow when it is applicable otherwise she uses what it takes to get her done. She can play well and dance at the same time.

Nov 1, 2020 - 6:55:43 AM
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325 posts since 7/31/2018

quote:
Originally posted by Dragonslayer
quote:
Originally posted by The Violin Beautiful

Here are a few:

https://youtu.be/3FybVapyAts

https://youtu.be/T6BRK5tCUk0

https://youtu.be/yR8Ga-S7tyQ

 

I'm sure there are plenty more, but these were the first three I found.

The baroque bow changes articulation in a way that compliments the fiddle style. It's worth trying some time. You might be pleasantly surprised! 


I've seen all three of those videos, but I never noticed the bow lol. 

How much do baroque bows cost in comparison to modern ones, and where can you find one? I'm currently playing a Fiddlerman CF, and wouldn't mind an upgrade, and would consider baroque 


Hey Gunnar, I've been using a Baroque bow for quite a while. That, along with a lot of the low tuning I do (especially A415), is the result of my playing in early music ensembles in my younger days. Baroque bows are characterized by the shorter length, but more importantly, the stick is straight when not tightened and "bows" in the opposite direction of a modern bow (hence the term "bow") when tightened. I wouldn't say the Baroque bow necessarily changes your articulation, but it does provide a different balance point, and if you are not used to it, you probably will tend to execute your bow strokes differently. 

 

Most of my fiddles don't have chin rests on them. The chin rest was a 19th century innovation. The violin family of instruments were held on the arm ("da braccio"--on the arm) as opposed to on the shoulder, as generally became to be the practice among violinists. So, if you hold your fiddle lower, there really is no reason for a chin rest (other than to ruin the aesthetics of a fiddle). 

 

There are many parallels with fiddling and early music. I've discussed some of them in my Old-Time TOTW videos and workshops.

 

I'm using a Baroque bow in many of my Old-Time TOTW videos as well. Using one with natural black horsehair in this week's video, actually (Red Bird, see below).

 

You can get some inexpensive Baroque style bows from eBay. Just like anything, some are better than others. 


Edited by - FiddlerPaul71 on 11/01/2020 06:57:32

Nov 1, 2020 - 7:08:05 PM

235 posts since 3/1/2020

quote:
Originally posted by Dragonslayer
quote:
Originally posted by The Violin Beautiful

Here are a few:

https://youtu.be/3FybVapyAts

https://youtu.be/T6BRK5tCUk0

https://youtu.be/yR8Ga-S7tyQ

 

I'm sure there are plenty more, but these were the first three I found.

The baroque bow changes articulation in a way that compliments the fiddle style. It's worth trying some time. You might be pleasantly surprised! 


I've seen all three of those videos, but I never noticed the bow lol. 

How much do baroque bows cost in comparison to modern ones, and where can you find one? I'm currently playing a Fiddlerman CF, and wouldn't mind an upgrade, and would consider baroque 


There are all kinds of cheap baroque bows for sale online. A while back, Shar started carrying a cheap bow for people looking to try it out. They sold quite a lot of them, so other Chinese workshsops started making their own versions. 
 

If you're willing to upgrade a bit, I'd suggest getting a bow that has been selected by a specialist in baroque instruments and bows. The link below is to bows sold by Andrew Dipper, one of the country's foremost restorers and baroque violin specialists:

https://www.vermontviolins.com/new-products/andrew-dipper-baroque-imported-violin-bow

The term "baroque bow" is a bit of an umbrella term, because there were many different styles during that period. You can get a sense for the variety by reading William Monical's "Shapes of the Baroque." Some of the earlier bows were more convex under tension, but they evolved with the changes in performance style to be straighter abs eventually somewhat concave, foreshadowing the modern bow. There's a good chance that most bows you find online will be more of a Corelli model. Serious early music players these days will often have different bows for each period or region. 
 

The bows of that epoch were designed for dance music, where the downbeat was heavily stressed and the second beat was played much more lightly. The stiffness and weight of the baroque bow naturally lends itself to this kind of articulation and facilitates quicker runs without slurring. The Tourte bow was developed in part to facilitate legato and sustained notes. The "Iron-Clad Rule of the Downbeat" was gradually phased out as the composition style changed. 

Nov 2, 2020 - 1:12:49 AM

Dragonslayer

Mozambique

263 posts since 9/1/2019

Well, I did a bit of research on them, and from what y'all have described, and what I read, a baroque style bow would not be the best thin for how I play. I tend to use the full length of the bow, and use a lot of legato. I would like to have one at some point for a diversion, but it wouldn't be the best for my only bow.

Nov 2, 2020 - 6:29:42 PM
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14 posts since 5/18/2009

Hard to tell from the video but I am betting that that is one of those Incredibows, not an actual baroque bow. incredibow.com/ I know a few folks who have them. They are pretty inexpensive and never need rehairing. Very light but they come in all sorts of colors.

Actually I looked a little more carefully and I think hers is a baroque bow—at least it looks like it has an adjuster, so not an Incredibow.

Edited by - jgarber760 on 11/02/2020 18:41:04

Nov 3, 2020 - 8:01:17 AM

325 posts since 7/31/2018

It's more accurate to say that Incredibows *can't* be rehaired, as opposed to "never need rehairing." Big difference there. Once they are spent, that's it. They don't last forever.

Edited by - FiddlerPaul71 on 11/03/2020 08:02:20

Nov 9, 2020 - 7:46:11 PM
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14 posts since 5/18/2009

quote:
Originally posted by FiddlerPaul71

It's more accurate to say that Incredibows *can't* be rehaired, as opposed to "never need rehairing." Big difference there. Once they are spent, that's it. They don't last forever.


Yes, Paul, you are correct. I have tried these bows a few times and am not a big fan.  This from their web site:

NO Horsehair is used.  ALL the “hair” is made of tough polymer filament designed to grab the strings well (when rosined) and last literally for YEARS!  Bow AND hair is warranted to last a minimum of three years.  Some musicians have regularly used the same Incredibow for several years now, without loss of even one hair!

Edited by - jgarber760 on 11/09/2020 19:46:37

Nov 9, 2020 - 8:25:51 PM

325 posts since 7/31/2018

Exactly, Jim...not for me

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