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Sep 16, 2020 - 5:04:56 PM

DougD

USA

9765 posts since 12/2/2007

"Perfect Every Time." I don't know about that, but alaskafiddler mentioned bread machines in another thread and I thought I'd put in a little plug for this book: amazon.com/Bread-Machine-Bakin...688145655
And a little story: Lora was my high school girlfriend, and when I heard this book was out I drove over an hour to a chain bookstore to buy a copy. I took it to the cashier and proudly told her my story and she asked "Oh, did she like to cook a lot?" I had to think for awhile and realized I'd never seen her cook anything! We had many other interests.
Anyway, I think its still a pretty good book, and is of course available used (as are probably a lot of bread machines).

Sep 16, 2020 - 5:32:47 PM

188 posts since 6/11/2019

I bought my wife a bread machine 15-20 years ago and it made some good stuff. But now she just uses it to make the dough, then takes that out and kneads it into a pan to bake in the oven. Or in the case of sourdough or cross-type bread, a clay/crock-type thingy. I've become, in addition to "Comfortably Numb," fat now.

Looking forward to the inputs to this thread!

Edited by - Flat_the_3rd_n7th on 09/16/2020 17:34:24

Sep 16, 2020 - 5:56:12 PM

2042 posts since 10/22/2007

Alot like Scott, we started just making dough. Then once we figured out at this point, the machine doesn't do much. Just pitch some yeast, and whoop up some basic dough, and retired the machine. Mostly for pizza crusts for us. BTW not into sourdough. Probably makes me less than.

Sep 16, 2020 - 6:04:01 PM
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11240 posts since 9/23/2009

I always loved the making of the dough myself...but I guess if a person is extremely busy, a machine would be handy to have to avoid store bought styrofoam bread...lol.

Edited by - groundhogpeggy on 09/16/2020 18:04:47

Sep 17, 2020 - 3:13:16 AM
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169 posts since 4/15/2019

I love making bread the old fashion way. I use a wooden kneading bowl I bought years ago at shaker village in Ky. Think I will make more today!

Sep 18, 2020 - 12:38:36 PM

Fiddler

USA

4103 posts since 6/22/2007

Bread machine --- bleah!!! For me, why waste the money? Part of the enjoyment in making bread is the process. It is very sensuous, and it can also be a very spiritual experience. And, the time needed to make bread is not that much! Yes, you need to pay attention to it. For me, the actual "time in the dough" is probably about 30-45 minutes - total. This is for sourdough and over a couple of days.  Yeast breads will be over the course of a few hours. The most time consuming part is the clean-up. The hardest part is waiting, especially that excruciating painful period after removing the bread from the oven and letting it cool.

The texture of the flour - bread flour has a different feel from whole wheat and rye flours. When it is mixed with the levain (or commerical yeast), water and salt, you can feel the nature of dough change as the glutinen opens up and allows gliaden to attach to it forming the stretchy gluten network. You can actually feel the change happening - during the kneading process (commerical yeast) or the stretch & fold process in sourdough.

I try to use heritage grains when I can and there are several wonderful grains that are grown here in Texas! Just 4 ingredients - flour, water, yeast and salt - create a wondrous thing! Above all, the flavor from the heritage grains is far superior to anything that is store-bought. My wife and I actually feel a bit sorry for those who have to buy store bought bread!

As I mix and work the dough, I think about all of the people who made the flour possible - the farmer, the harvester, the miller, and the retailer. Every one gets a moment of my focus and appreciation. This is in addition to my gratitude for the Earth and its riches that allow the wheat to grow.

Also, during the process I focus on the recipient of my effort. If it is for home, I think about my wife and the enjoyment and nourishment it brings. If it is for a gift to a neighbor or friend, I focus on them and their enjoyment. Or, if I am using a family bread recipe, I think about my ancestors.

Thus, making bread connects me with the wider community - family, friends, and those I may never know. A bread machine does not do this for me.

Edited by - Fiddler on 09/18/2020 12:51:07

Sep 18, 2020 - 1:11:31 PM
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Fiddler

USA

4103 posts since 6/22/2007

I have been making yeast breads for years. A musician friend of mine in western NC (a great left-handed banjoist!) had been encouraging me to get into sourdough for several years. When I "retired" at the end of 2017, I decided to dig in. I developed my own starter and learned the processes. My friend has been a great inspiration! I do about 5-6 1 kg loaves a week. In fact, I have a loaf in the over right now that we will have with dinner this evening.

Have either my wife and I gained weight? No. (Not all of the loaves end up in our bellies! That's for another post.)

We have just two rules:
Rule #1: Never eat an entire loaf in one sitting.
Rule #2: Follow Rule #1.

FWIW - the current sourdough craze has been interesting to watch. I am a member of a couple of SD groups on Facebook. Lots of newcomers who struggle with SD. Much depends on "knowing the dough" and not following the timings given in various recipes. Those are almost ALWAYS wrong! Timings are dependent on ambient conditions. If your kitchen temperature and humidity are different from the recipe author's kitchen, the recipe will not work as described!

Sep 18, 2020 - 5:27:38 PM

2042 posts since 10/22/2007

Ok, so here's a question: The SD I like has the texture of yeast bread. Yes, it's store bought commercial sourdough. Because it tastes sauer, and i like that. But all the artisan SD loaves don't have the texture i like. So is there a hybrid levening that gives a sauer taste, but a yeast texture?

Sep 18, 2020 - 5:59:47 PM

4834 posts since 9/26/2008

quote:
Originally posted by farmerjones

Ok, so here's a question: The SD I like has the texture of yeast bread. Yes, it's store bought commercial sourdough. Because it tastes sauer, and i like that. But all the artisan SD loaves don't have the texture i like. So is there a hybrid levening that gives a sauer taste, but a yeast texture?


Most store bought are yeasted beads with a sour added. I can taste the difference. 

Sep 18, 2020 - 6:31:41 PM
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188 posts since 6/11/2019

Wife follered a starter recipe that took 10 days and required you to throw away half of it every time you fed it. That one was OK, but we didn't throw it away--either doubled up or fed to chickens. But then there was another that said to add yeast. WTH?

From my knowledge of "beer" (heh-heh) making, there's always wild yeast on produce that will ferment whatever simple saccharides there are in the mash, producing CO2 (which rises the bread), and alcohol. Shouldn't have to add store-bought yeast unless you want to accelerate the process. But wife found plentiful starter recipes that called for store yeast.

At any rate, I love sourdough above any other...slap some preserves on it...Good Lord Amighty

Edited by - Flat_the_3rd_n7th on 09/18/2020 18:34:00

Sep 18, 2020 - 8:17:28 PM

4834 posts since 9/26/2008

My chickens LOVE sourdough starter. I slap it on a plank and they rush to clean it up.

No commercial yeast is needed or desired in making a starter, and if the bread recipe calls for yeast, the yeast will do all of the rising work and the starter is there for filler and possibly flavor if it is very ripe starter.

My wife's grandma used a bread machine and the bread was good as far as I can remember (been many years).

Sep 18, 2020 - 8:20:04 PM

4834 posts since 9/26/2008

All of the starter recipes want you to toss half, and it is important when you are just starting it (pun unavoidable), but once it is good and strong, you can build the amount you need from small amounts without having to cull any.

Sep 19, 2020 - 8:32:02 PM
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GeoB

USA

12 posts since 7/22/2020

We use it a bit. I like making the pizza dough in it.

I took a sharpie and wrote on it in large print

"always store with the paddle attached"

which was after the 3rd time of loading it up and turning it on and watching it not knead... kinda messy.

Sep 20, 2020 - 11:00:30 AM

4834 posts since 9/26/2008

quote:
Originally posted by GeoB

We use it a bit. I like making the pizza dough in it.

I took a sharpie and wrote on it in large print

"always store with the paddle attached"

which was after the 3rd time of loading it up and turning it on and watching it not knead... kinda messy.


Classic. Like the guitar player saying, something's wrong with my amp." Then discovering it wasn't plugged in. laugh

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