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Sep 10, 2020 - 2:59:51 PM

bitman

USA

16 posts since 9/1/2019

I slid into notes because I'm a relative beginner and have beginners bad intonation.

So Yes.

Sep 10, 2020 - 3:08 PM

8933 posts since 3/19/2009

quote:
Originally posted by bitman

I slid into notes because I'm a relative beginner and have beginners bad intonation.

So Yes.


In my opinion, if you are a beginner and KNOW that you need to slid to get a note...then you probably have a good 'ear'.. that is a good thing..wink

Sep 10, 2020 - 9:02:54 PM
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bitman

USA

16 posts since 9/1/2019

quote:
Originally posted by TuneWeaver
quote:
Originally posted by bitman

I slid into notes because I'm a relative beginner and have beginners bad intonation.

So Yes.


In my opinion, if you are a beginner and KNOW that you need to slid to get a note...then you probably have a good 'ear'.. that is a good thing..wink


I'd like to think so. My "good' ears are all I have as I have never been able to read music,

I slide as a crutch right now.

Sep 11, 2020 - 4:43:21 AM

Earworm

USA

170 posts since 1/30/2018

Hey @bitman, you're in good company. A whole lotta musicians don't read dots, they just make music. :)

Dec 13, 2020 - 1:25:23 AM
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223 posts since 6/21/2012

Absoposilutely! They don’t call me snakefinger for nothing. wink

Dec 13, 2020 - 10:13:17 AM
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25 posts since 11/20/2020

I don’t have much to add: lots of folks have covered this. I did a workshop with Kevin Burke. He will intentionally flatten notes at times as a subtle ornamentation, but he’s eminently capable of hitting notes spot on when he wants. From that I strive to have good intonation but I also strive to be purposeful when I bend notes.

Edited by - bulltrout on 12/13/2020 10:14:02

Dec 16, 2020 - 1:28:11 PM

223 posts since 6/21/2012

In a workshop Andrew Finn Magill was imitating the styles of other fiddlers, and very impressively at that. Then he said “Here’s Martin Hayes” and he only played two or three notes, sliding into the last one, and somehow he had nailed Martin Hayes! He explained that ‘the trick’ was not hitting the note. You slid up towards it, but you never quite got there, you stopped just a wee bit flat. If you know Martin Hayes, you know that he's an extremely expressive player, and listening now I can recognize this as being a very effective aspect of his playing. But it's harder than it sounds!

Edited by - snakefinger on 12/16/2020 13:34:41

Dec 16, 2020 - 1:59:15 PM
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2546 posts since 7/12/2013

I come from a more formal background so I'm sure that colors my opinion.

I think that sliding into notes is definitely part of the non-classical idiom (jazz, rock, blues, bluegrass, etc.). BUT I think that you should be able to control it. It should be something that you are specifically want to do. Not because you can't hit the note on the first try.

Dec 16, 2020 - 2:13:27 PM
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1863 posts since 8/27/2008

quote:
Originally posted by fiddlinsteudel

BUT I think that you should be able to control it. It should be something that you are specifically want to do. Not because you can't hit the note on the first try.


I agree with that. In my opinion one can use slides to get better at instant intonation - especially if they're part of the style already. That takes paying attention all the time and aiming for shorter slides until you don't need to rely on it. Even very good players use micro adjusting as needed which means being very close and adjusting very quickly

Dec 16, 2020 - 2:29:40 PM
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2546 posts since 7/12/2013

quote:
Originally posted by Brian Wood
 

I agree with that. In my opinion one can use slides to get better at instant intonation - especially if they're part of the style already. That takes paying attention all the time and aiming for shorter slides until you don't need to rely on it. Even very good players use micro adjusting as needed which means being very close and adjusting very quickly


When I think of micro adjusting it's more just rolling the finger back and forth. Sliding in my mind is not micro. But we are probably saying the same thing.

My suggestion for folks that want to hit notes right on (or close enough for bluegrass) is if you find yourself sliding into a particular note in a passage a lot, go back and practice hitting that note correctly, otherwise you are practicing the problem.

Dec 16, 2020 - 2:52:31 PM
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1863 posts since 8/27/2008

quote:
Originally posted by fiddlinsteudel
quote:
Originally posted by Brian Wood
 

I agree with that. In my opinion one can use slides to get better at instant intonation - especially if they're part of the style already. That takes paying attention all the time and aiming for shorter slides until you don't need to rely on it. Even very good players use micro adjusting as needed which means being very close and adjusting very quickly


When I think of micro adjusting it's more just rolling the finger back and forth. Sliding in my mind is not micro. But we are probably saying the same thing.

My suggestion for folks that want to hit notes right on (or close enough for bluegrass) is if you find yourself sliding into a particular note in a passage a lot, go back and practice hitting that note correctly, otherwise you are practicing the problem.


Yes, you're's right. Micro adjusting isn't sliding. And, as you encourage the poster, practice is what it takes for sure.

Dec 16, 2020 - 4:03:09 PM

1742 posts since 12/11/2008

Sliding into notes adds both informality and dash. Unless you're playing Brahms (okay, I gotta confess that right now I'm listening to his 4th symphony), ya wanna sound heartfelt and happy. Not stiff and severe.

Dec 17, 2020 - 7:28:39 AM
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223 posts since 6/21/2012

I mean, the fiddle CAN slide. A lot of instruments can’t. Why would you want take it off the table as an option? Slides, scrunches, blunt notes; they’re all part of your palette. But absolutely, put in the effort be able to hit the pitch cleanly too.

Dec 29, 2020 - 7:34:07 AM
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4289 posts since 6/23/2007

I don't use slides as a "crutch". But I do like hearing and using slides on all the stringed instruments I play. If the music sounds good, anything goes. Even using slides to solve intonation problems.

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