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Aug 3, 2020 - 9:32:44 AM
3 posts since 8/3/2020

I'm trying to learn Lonesome Road Blues in A cross tuning by ear and trying to determine if the open cross tuned E string (lower E) works with the B note on the A string?

It sounds like that is the double stop being played. But it feels counter intuitive, possibly because playing in cross tuning is new to me? Anyway I'm unable to determine with certainty by ear if that is actually being played. E + B notes ???? I can't remember ever playing the two as a double stop in standard tuning.

Aug 3, 2020 - 10:17:31 AM
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DougD

USA

9768 posts since 12/2/2007

Being played where and by whom? Without knowing that I can't say, but E and B are the 1 and 5 of an E chotd and should work fine. Fifths need to be perfect though.

Aug 3, 2020 - 11:10:52 AM

3 posts since 8/3/2020

Hi Doug,

Thanks for the feedback. So it's a field recording and I don't know who the fiddler is. I know it's in cross A tuning only because it was mentioned. My knowledge on chord construction is woefully limited, almost nil so I was trying to recall ever playing the two notes as a double stop before but simply escapes me if I ever have.

Because I was almost certain that it was the open cross tuned E string with the B note (on the A string) I was struggling with my inclination to note the G note with the B in the context of the phrasing, but it didn't seem to match what I was hearing.

And golly gee, an open string makes it a whole lot easier for me, so I'm good to go with it. It would be hard not to have it spot on, unless you're me. :)

I thank you again.. just discovered this forum, and grateful I was able to ask this question and get a knowledgeable response so quickly!

Edited by - msfiddlestix on 08/03/2020 11:14:34

Aug 3, 2020 - 11:53:18 AM

4847 posts since 9/26/2008

In standard tuning, you would stop the two strings with one finger. In old time you would likely only encounter that fingering in an E minor leaning tune. Otherwise it would have the high e string as the drone. Does that make sense?

Aug 3, 2020 - 11:54:19 AM
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Players Union Member

boxbow

USA

2564 posts since 2/3/2011

I'm unfamiliar with the tune. Some day I'll look it up.

One of the reasons for cross-tuning as you and your source have is to have access to those easy open string drones. Big sound multiplier.

So the question is, "Does it sound right to you?" If anyone else matters, ask them to have a listen.

Aug 3, 2020 - 12:24:14 PM
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4847 posts since 9/26/2008

quote:
Originally posted by ChickenMan

In standard tuning, you would stop the two strings with one finger. In old time standard tuning you would likely only encounter that fingering in an E minor leaning tune. Otherwise it would have the high e string as the drone. Does that make sense?


Edit to add the bold

Aug 3, 2020 - 12:25:24 PM
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4847 posts since 9/26/2008

quote:
Originally posted by boxbow

I'm unfamiliar with the tune. Some day I'll look it up.

One of the reasons for cross-tuning as you and your source have is to have access to those easy open string drones. Big sound multiplier.

So the question is, "Does it sound right to you?" If anyone else matters, ask them to have a listen.


"I'm going down the road feeling bad" 

Aug 3, 2020 - 1:22:51 PM
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3 posts since 8/3/2020

In standard tuning, you would stop the two strings with one finger. In old time you would likely only encounter that fingering in an E minor leaning tune. Otherwise it would have the high e string as the drone. Does that make sense?

Totally. How could I forget, come to think of it. Tons of Irish tunes in the key of Em. When I play Irish tunes in Em on my mandolin, I almost always play the E on the D string with the B on the A string. For whatever reason, I didn't make that association when attempting to learn on old time tune in cross A tuning.

In other words until now, the sound of the Em chord mostly live in the key of Em or D or G. But I hadn't associated that chord in the key of A. I'll be listening to it with a completely fresh perspective. Thanks for the input.

Edited by - msfiddlestix on 08/03/2020 13:25:57

Aug 3, 2020 - 1:47:58 PM

DougD

USA

9768 posts since 12/2/2007

In "Lonesome Road Blues" its not likely to be an E minor. If this is for the phrase "Ain't gonna be treated this a way" its E major. As I said, E and B are the 1 and 5 for an E chord. Without the third it could be major or minor. There are other double stops that could be used there too that would include the third, but you asked about this one.
E minor would not be associated with the key of A because its not built with the notes of the A major diatonic scale. The G in that scale is G#, not G natural so its the major chord.

Edited by - DougD on 08/03/2020 13:51:18

Aug 3, 2020 - 7:35:28 PM

4847 posts since 9/26/2008

No but that Em shape is just the 1 and 5 so it is the same two notes and that was the example, not a comment on the key. It appears my point was understood. 

Edited by - ChickenMan on 08/03/2020 19:43:51

Aug 3, 2020 - 7:43:41 PM

DougD

USA

9768 posts since 12/2/2007

Yes I know, but I think you meant that that shape might be used in an E minor leaning tune, and Heidi took that to mean that was the case here. Which I don't think it is.

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