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Jul 3, 2020 - 1:31:44 PM
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bsed

USA

4163 posts since 6/23/2007

I like playing in C. I usually opt for the open chord, though at times I like to try the barre F. I'm fortunate that at almost 65 (September) I have no arthritis to complain about. 

Jul 3, 2020 - 1:48:32 PM

9340 posts since 3/19/2009

quote:
Originally posted by bsed

I like playing in C. I usually opt for the open chord, though at times I like to try the barre F. I'm fortunate that at almost 65 (September) I have no arthritis to complain about. 


Dang Bruce.. you are still  a child..!!! Good for you!!

Jul 3, 2020 - 3:31:19 PM
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271 posts since 4/15/2019

I don't know what all the fuss is about. I play it just like Banjo Brad said. Index finger on first two strings. Sometimes for the right effect I hook thumb over the E string. No big deal.

Jul 4, 2020 - 7:15:11 AM
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5370 posts since 9/26/2008

Much of what makes the F chord hard has to do with the guitar’s setup. Too much height at the nut usually, but string gauge can be a factor too.

Jul 4, 2020 - 11:40:21 AM

3117 posts since 6/21/2007

If you look at my fingers, you can see why I don't use my thumb on the sixth string - it won't reach. Not even on a narrower neck.

Setup does have a lot to do with it, and nylon strings help a whole bunch!

Old Cowboy - I tend to reach automatically for the full barre unless I want my little finger available for melody notes.

Jul 4, 2020 - 11:48:04 AM

1603 posts since 4/6/2014

Easiest and most relaxing way to play a 3 chorder in C is to plant your 4th finger (pinkie) on the G ( high E string), and 3rd finger on the D (B string), and keep em there. And just move your 1st and 2nd fingers as a unit from:

2nd finger C (A string), 1st finger E (D string) for the C Chord.

2nd finger G (low E string), 1st finger B (A string) for the G chord.

2nd finger F (D string), 1st finger A (G string) for the F chord.

...Ok its a F69..., and the C is a C Maj9...But they sound OK and a bit modal, which should sound good for OT etc??...and they are REALLY easy. Just play the top 4 strings for the F chord, top 5 strings ror the C chord and all of the strings for the G
 

Edited by - pete_fiddle on 07/04/2020 11:59:11

Jul 4, 2020 - 12:23:55 PM
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67 posts since 1/28/2018

There are lots choices...full chords, partial, voicings, capoed...the only real problem sounds like the difference between a guitar owner and a guitar player...a player has little (if any) trouble accommodating a key or chord once they know where a piece goes.

Jul 4, 2020 - 3:34:10 PM
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DougD

USA

10264 posts since 12/2/2007

When Lonesome Fiddler described how he fingers a G chord I was going to say that fingering is what distinguishes a guitar player from somebody who's sitting with a box in his lap that happens to have strings on it.

Jul 4, 2020 - 5:04:26 PM

5370 posts since 9/26/2008

quote:
Originally posted by DougD

When Lonesome Fiddler described how he fingers a G chord I was going to say that fingering is what distinguishes a guitar player from somebody who's sitting with a box in his lap that happens to have strings on it.


I learned it that way and never understood using the first three fingers. Depending on the key, I might play it as Pete described, but leaving the index finger free is the most versatile way for sure 

Jul 4, 2020 - 6:12:14 PM

2761 posts since 9/13/2009

quote:
Originally posted by pete_fiddle

Easiest and most relaxing way to play a 3 chorder in C is to plant your 4th finger (pinkie) on the G ( high E string), and 3rd finger on the D (B string), and keep em there. And just move your 1st and 2nd fingers as a unit from:

2nd finger C (A string), 1st finger E (D string) for the C Chord.

2nd finger G (low E string), 1st finger B (A string) for the G chord.

2nd finger F (D string), 1st finger A (G string) for the F chord.

...Ok its a F69..., and the C is a C Maj9...But they sound OK and a bit modal, which should sound good for OT etc??...and they are REALLY easy. Just play the top 4 strings for the F chord, top 5 strings ror the C chord and all of the strings for the G
 


I was going to point out that some prefer the key of C shapes to key of D shapes; find it easier; or just has better sound/options. So will capo up 2 for key of D and use C shapes.

------------------

Here is what I find typically easiest for accompanying fiddle tunes. Keep in mind for boom chuck, you want a good bass (boom); but don't always need to play full chords (make a chuck).

The basic C chord shape is not hard, nor should strain the thumb.

1st string open
2nd string First finger on 1st fret
3rd string; open
4th sting; Second finger on 2nd fret
5th string; Third finger on 3rd fret 
Sixth string; Fourth finger on 3rd fret . Perhaps optional, but good for alternating bass.
 

The F chord I use most, view as essentially moving that same shape of second third and fourth fingers down one course.

1st string First finger on 1st fret
2nd string First finger on 1st fret
3rd string; Second finger on 2nd fret
4th sting; Third finger on 3rd fret
5th string; Fourth finger on 3rd fret  (for alternating bass)
[F chord quite often doesn't need to use the low F on sixth string]

The G chord, mostly just shifts the same second and third finger shape over a course the other way from C.

-------

There is an alternative that comes in handy, is reversing the third and fourth fingers on third fret. For F it is the same shape as what would use for a barre chord. Easy to add in low F. Use for both C and F, again same shape of 2/3/4 fingers, just moves over a course.

---------

Three finger option.
There is another option folks use for C and F, for alternating bass for either chord, without need for pinkie;  some just shift third finger back and forth; but keeping rest of chord shape. 

-----------

I would add; If the first string is troublesome for any chord (F, G, D, A, Bm..), can often just leave it out for many chords and just focus on the bass and middle.

Edited by - alaskafiddler on 07/04/2020 18:26:16

Jul 6, 2020 - 1:53:43 AM

1603 posts since 4/6/2014

There's loads of standard gypsy swing stuff in C using "Django" chord shapes, which don't use many (if any) barre chords. Those guys seem to be able to Chug along all day. For C they seem to be mostly around the 7th/8th fret. it sort of sounds a bit like Rodney Miller if  you play trad stuff with folk who use em. especially if there's a bass as well.

Jul 25, 2020 - 10:40:40 AM

537 posts since 8/3/2013

F chord on guitar like some others is a rite of passage. Actually a rudimentary chord shape and moveable, difficulty with it just means (discounting structural illness) you haven't paid your dues in hours practiced (or your guitar setup sukks). The thumb....think Hendrix, a la Little Wing. Moveable chords and embellishments are made more fluid by the use of the thumb to anchor a note while leaving the rest of the hand with more dexterity.

Jul 25, 2020 - 2:19:55 PM

1854 posts since 12/11/2008

One thing to keep in mind when you play folk-style back-up/rhythm guitar is that it's perfectly OK to only strum three or four strings. That goes even more with jazz. Django chords almost invariably involve only the middle four strings. It's something that not only adds that distinctive Django crunch (for trad jazz you don't want the guitar to ring out, folk-style), it allows you to do chords practically everywhere up & down the neck without your fingers getting tired.

Edited by - Lonesome Fiddler on 07/25/2020 14:21:27

Jul 25, 2020 - 2:58:53 PM
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1603 posts since 4/6/2014

quote:
Originally posted by Lonesome Fiddler

One thing to keep in mind when you play folk-style back-up/rhythm guitar is that it's perfectly OK to only strum three or four strings. That goes even more with jazz. Django chords almost invariably involve only the middle four strings. It's something that not only adds that distinctive Django crunch (for trad jazz you don't want the guitar to ring out, folk-style), it allows you to do chords practically everywhere up & down the neck without your fingers getting tired.


RE: Django chords,

Root or 5th on the E or A string the rest of em on the middle strings . If yo use the E string for the root or 5th the A string is naturally damped. m7 and m6 are the minors and Maj 7 Maj 6 are the majors. m7b5 is the dom7 for major keys, and Diminished is the dom 7 for minor keys usually.....but as always....not always.  interestingly the m7b5 (2 chord in a minor progression) is also an inversion of a minor6 chord. After a while they all sound like a snare drum so ....its all about the the bass...bout the bass ;o)

Jul 25, 2020 - 3:08:13 PM
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1854 posts since 12/11/2008

Pete, yeah. I guess I should'a picked up my guitar and played a few Django tunes before I posted.

Jul 25, 2020 - 3:24:08 PM

1603 posts since 4/6/2014

quote:
Originally posted by Lonesome Fiddler

Pete, yeah. I guess I should'a picked up my guitar and played a few Django tunes before I posted.


i need to get into swing mode.....but i keep playing trad stuff, because it sounds ok solo..... to me anyway. i have some great swing players to play with. Two guitars and a bass. But we can't get together lately, and the swing stuff is going off the boil :o(

Jul 26, 2020 - 8:51:38 PM

3117 posts since 6/21/2007

My first three chords on the guitar were C, F, & G7. Learned because the song I was learning was in C, which is what was notated in the song book I was learning from.

Jul 27, 2020 - 12:02:33 PM
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9340 posts since 3/19/2009

Is this the F chord you guys are talkin' about?Image may contain: text that says 'If 2020 was a chord: youtube.com/toddpoorel'

Edited by - TuneWeaver on 07/27/2020 12:02:58

Aug 31, 2020 - 8:51:45 AM
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102 posts since 11/12/2011

Hi Tuneweaver,
   If your guitarist friend prefers playing in A-shaped chords, maybe have them try capo'ing at the 3rd fret.
   Regarding that "thumb-style" F-chord (see mmuussiiccaall's photo above), I recently encountered it while trying to learn the guitar part in Wimbush Rag as I hear it on the 1920s recording. I found the following advice helpful for playing the "thumb-style" F-chord more comfortably : https://youtu.be/HSolRHYs6Xw . Though ultimately, I found that I prefer to play the tune uncapo'ed with D-shaped chords.

Edited by - christym on 08/31/2020 08:59:51

Aug 31, 2020 - 9:00:13 AM

9340 posts since 3/19/2009

quote:
Originally posted by christym

Hi Tuneweaver,
   If your guitarist friend prefers playing in A-shaped chords, maybe have them try capo'ing at the 3rd fret.
   Regarding that "thumb-style" F-chord (see mmuussiiccaall's photo above), I recently encountered it while trying to learn the guitar part in Wimbush Rag as I hear it on the 1920s recording. I found the following advice helpful for playing the "thumb-style" F-chord more comfortably : https://youtu.be/HSolRHYs6Xw . Though ultimately I found that I prefer to play the tune uncapo'ed with D-shaped chords.


Thanks, I'll pass that info to my friend..

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