Banjo Hangout Logo
Banjo Hangout Logo

Premier Sponsors

119
Fiddle Lovers Online


VIbrato - Very confused about technique and how to practice

Jun 14, 2020 - 6:58:37 AM
3 posts since 5/9/2020

Hi all,

I'm making this post because, as title, I'm very confused how to make mine Vibrato technique and feel it natural.

Starting that I've never done vibrato before, I'm looking for constant every day exercises that with time will bring me to a correct vibrato.

I've found following videos:
youtube.com/watch?v=BIUc-j1iNV4
violinmasterclass.com/en/maste...d/vibrato
and so on..

Most of vibrato I've see are Arm vibrato, wrist is straight (it's also advised to keep it in this way) and vibrato is performed moving arm, this in all finger positions.

In some videos there's Wrist vibrato, in this cases you can clearly see that wrist bends back to violin's scroll and than back to straight position.

Meanwhile nearby violin body, like in fifth position and so on,  there's someone that use Arm vibrato and someone  that use wrist vibrato (this time wrist is moved from forward (body direction) bend position and goes to straight position).

All of this technique have different exercises.

But I've found also that someone that stays to use wrist vibrato seems to use arm vibrato. The only very explicit wrist vibrato that I've found is from ViolinMasterClass (above link). Where you can clearly see from Teacher that wrist is moved.

Since I want to start to learn Vibrato and, probably, I'll learn only one technique for a while due my time constrains.

Can you explain if one technique is good and one is less. Pros and Cons. If one if more difficult an one easier. Or if in both technique I can get same vibrato quality, wideness and frequency.

Actually I've tried Arm vibrato that seems easier to me to keep finger position and perform uniform movement, but I feel a lot of movement on violin holding position and I can't reach high vibration frequencies.

While I've tried Wrist vibrato, and found it unnatural (to me) and difficult to keep constant movement range and therefor frequency. Maybe becouse less training on it.

Looking for your expertise opinions and tips! And eventually exercises (videos) advices.

Edited by - Yaro on 06/14/2020 07:04:14

Jun 14, 2020 - 7:45:19 AM
likes this

2336 posts since 10/1/2008

Well ..... As for what I have been taught. Wrist , elbow and finger vibrato are all legitimate vibrato styles. The thing is, in classical music vibrato is "the" thing whereas in folk music vibrato is "a " thing. What I am trying to express is a level of importance to a given musical style. For me leaning my finger back and then forward a few times with maybe a hair of wrist produces enough vibrato. I have never approached true wrist and elbow vibratos as a technique and never felt it was needed in what I play. Luck... R/

Jun 14, 2020 - 1:01:24 PM

cunparis

France

142 posts since 11/4/2012

My first teacher tried to teach me arm vibrato but I couldn't do it because my hand was too tense. The second teacher taught me to press less on the strings and once I could do that, he taught me finger vibrato. This was after 6 years of weekly lessons, and it took me over 1 year of daily exercises before I could do it. and I'm still not that good at it.

So I think vibrato is hard and you need a teacher that can find the vibrato style best for you and eliminate any tension to free up your hand. Which reminds me, I also couldn't do it because my left index was supporting the violin. Now I play without the index touching the violin and my hand is much more free. But this doesn't work for everyone.

Simon Fischer has a chapter about it in his excellent book: simonfischeronline.com/the-vio...sson.html
He also has a vidoe on it in one of his DVDs, I think it's the warm up dvd.

Jun 14, 2020 - 6:08:14 PM

2262 posts since 8/23/2008

Simon Streuff's video on vibrato is very good.

Here are some more basic exercises for the development of vibrato....


 

Jun 14, 2020 - 7:29:33 PM

367 posts since 3/1/2020

All three are common styles of vibrato. Regardless of which one you use, here’s a simple but effective exercise to develop a good vibrato:

Get a metronome and set it to a moderately slow tempo (think andante). With each beat, bend the pitch of the note above or below the normal note. Keep strictly to the beat and do it for long enough that you become used to the motion. Once you reach that point, increase the tempo a few beats on the metronome. Repeat this until you reach a speed that’s faster than what you would consider normal. By the time you get there, your vibrato will feel comfortable.

When you’re first starting with it, it’s going to feel artificial no matter what. It’s through careful practice that one develops a feeling of a natural vibrato. Once you have that, you can learn to vary the speed and amplitude for different passages. Vibrato is not a static thing, and a good understanding of it helps to make a good player!

Edited by - The Violin Beautiful on 06/14/2020 19:29:57

Jun 14, 2020 - 10:16:56 PM

doryman

USA

140 posts since 2/10/2020

quote:
Originally posted by The Violin Beautiful



Get a metronome and set it to a moderately slow tempo (think andante). With each beat, bend the pitch of the note above or below the normal note. Keep strictly to the beat and do it for long enough that you become used to the motion.


How do you bend a note to below the normal pitch? 

Jun 14, 2020 - 10:39:42 PM

367 posts since 3/1/2020

quote:
Originally posted by doryman
quote:
Originally posted by The Violin Beautiful



Get a metronome and set it to a moderately slow tempo (think andante). With each beat, bend the pitch of the note above or below the normal note. Keep strictly to the beat and do it for long enough that you become used to the motion.


How do you bend a note to below the normal pitch? 


This is accomplished by rocking the finger on its tip. The motion can be driven by the arm, wrist, or finger. The fingertip rocks back and forth on the string, moving above and below the intended pitch.

Jun 15, 2020 - 3:37:27 AM

Jimbeaux

Germany

378 posts since 5/24/2016

If you have a pancake hold like me, then wrist vibrato is easiest.

I worked to avoid the pancake hold, but then went back to it out of personal preference. If it's good enough for my favorite fiddlers who played it like that their whole lives, it's good enough for me.

Jun 15, 2020 - 3:43:10 AM
likes this

3 posts since 5/9/2020

quote:
Originally posted by buckhenry

Simon Streuff's video on vibrato is very good.

Here are some more basic exercises for the development of vibrato....


Thanks for all answer.

More research that I did bring me more to wrist vibrato. A lot of players, book and teachers have different argues to say that it's a correct technique using wrist. Not saying that arm vibrato is bed, but something that should be learned as second step to help 4th finger, if necessary, or with very high tunes where you may have problems to move the wrist.

Jun 15, 2020 - 9:01:32 AM
likes this

1879 posts since 8/27/2008

quote:
Originally posted by The Violin BeautifulThe fingertip rocks back and forth on the string, moving above and below the intended pitch.

Many players would say the most pleasing vibrato is from pitch to below the pitch and back again. I think so. Fretted instruments like guitar will work from pitch to higher, so our ears are used to both.

Jun 15, 2020 - 9:45:35 AM

doryman

USA

140 posts since 2/10/2020

quote:
Originally posted by The Violin Beautiful
quote:
Originally posted by doryman
quote:
Originally posted by The Violin Beautiful



Get a metronome and set it to a moderately slow tempo (think andante). With each beat, bend the pitch of the note above or below the normal note. Keep strictly to the beat and do it for long enough that you become used to the motion.


How do you bend a note to below the normal pitch? 


This is accomplished by rocking the finger on its tip. The motion can be driven by the arm, wrist, or finger. The fingertip rocks back and forth on the string, moving above and below the intended pitch.


Ahh, so you're not actually bending the string, like a guitarist would when they talk about bending notes. 

Jun 15, 2020 - 10:00:13 AM

367 posts since 3/1/2020

quote:
Originally posted by doryman
quote:

Ahh, so you're not actually bending the string, like a guitarist would when they talk about bending notes. 


No, just the pitch. Sorry for the confusion. 

Jun 15, 2020 - 4:48:23 PM

2262 posts since 8/23/2008

quote:
Originally posted by Yaro
with very high tunes where you may have problems to move the wrist.

Wrist vibrato can be used all the way to the end of the finger board.

Besides, those exercises I posted can be easily adapted for the elbow, just bend the elbow rather than the wrist. 

Hangout Network Help

View All Topics  |  View Categories

0.171875