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Dec 14, 2019 - 2:45:15 PM
1 posts since 12/14/2019

Just bought this violin yesterday afternoon. Has bow and rosin...NEW.

Got it home. I can't tune it.
The turn things let go and I think now it's tuned to ZVXL or something unlike music. just now working right or I am doing something very wrong. keys not doing what I want them to do. Somebody over to the Banjo Hangout said it was friction pegs.

I play some guitar, banjo, dobro and mando. This are a whole new thing for me.

I made a big long post over to the Banjo folks. All about this.

Okay. I hit a ditch. I need help in tuning the brand new violin. Fell in love with the sound over on RFDTV. That's how come.

Thanks for reading my problem.
Nancy

Dec 14, 2019 - 5:11:48 PM

Old Scratch

Canada

490 posts since 6/22/2016

Trouble is, this kind of thing is really tedious to try to deal with in written text, although probably someone will come along to take up the challenge - but I would recommend that you sit down with someone who plays and have them take a look - a violin teacher, any fiddler, a luthier, or someone in the Strings section at a music store. There's probably no big problem; fiddle-tuning is always troublesome for beginners.

Dec 14, 2019 - 5:44:39 PM

LukeF

USA

29 posts since 10/15/2019

Nancy:

Sounds like your tuning pegs are slipping. When you tune, try pushing the pegs inwards as you turn the pegs. If it still slips try this product: sharmusic.com/Accessories/Peg-...ottle.axd

Also make sure you are tuned to the right octave. The notes on the open strings from low to high are G,D,A,E for a 4-string violin.

If all else fails, as OldScratch said, take it back to the violin shop to figure out the problem.

Dec 14, 2019 - 8:10:17 PM
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4364 posts since 9/26/2008

I bet there is a YouTube that will demonstrate how it works.

Dec 14, 2019 - 8:23:27 PM

401 posts since 8/10/2017

Once you get it tuned, don't be surprised if every note you play is ZVXL anyway.

Dec 15, 2019 - 12:35:36 AM
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Dragonslayer

Mozambique

250 posts since 9/1/2019

Sounds like probably you need to push the tuning pegs in as you turn. I'd second the recommendation to find someone familiar with the violin or fiddle and have them tune it and show you how to

Dec 15, 2019 - 6:43:51 AM
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WyoBob

USA

36 posts since 5/16/2019

Here's a good site that I think you will find helpful:  https://fiddlerman.com/

Dec 15, 2019 - 10:44:39 AM

1703 posts since 10/22/2007

I just worked on a brand new 35 dollar violin outfit. OP probably doesn't have a peg hole reamer, but you can scuff up the pegs with some fine sandpaper. Don't get the pegs out of round. Then i threw away the strings and dug out a set of five year old Prim strings. I'll bet the OP doesn't have those Prims, but can get a set of Preludes at the very least.
If it is a brand new outfit, you'll probablyneed to prime the bow too. Hint: get some powdered rosin.

Dec 15, 2019 - 11:41:15 AM

2966 posts since 6/21/2007

Welcome, Nancy! Glad you finally got on here.

You will find plenty of advise, so take it easy and go a step at a time. Fiddles are finiky, but once you get started, it is worth it.

I don't play enough (or long enough) feel I know what advice to give you, but just remember to take a deep breath whenever you start feeling frustrated.

Dec 15, 2019 - 12:54:49 PM
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10517 posts since 9/23/2009

I would look it up on youtube, as someone else already suggested. There should be some videos on there showing exactly how to tune each string on the violin.

Dec 15, 2019 - 12:58:18 PM

7805 posts since 3/19/2009

Nancy, don't let things get the best of you.. find a real life fiddle player to get you 'rolling'..

Dec 16, 2019 - 1:15:03 AM

2367 posts since 9/13/2009
Online Now

quote:
Originally posted by farmerjones

.....you can scuff up the pegs with some fine sandpaper.


NO. Probably not a good idea.

The problem for beginners is most likely just basic not understanding how friction pegs work. What you want is the peg to move/glide as smooth as possible all around the diameter. Pushing the peg in with just a little gentle pressure.

Dec 16, 2019 - 5:08:32 AM

1703 posts since 10/22/2007

quote:
Originally posted by alaskafiddler
quote:
Originally posted by farmerjones

.....you can scuff up the pegs with some fine sandpaper.


NO. Probably not a good idea.

The problem for beginners is most likely just basic not understanding how friction pegs work. What you want is the peg to move/glide as smooth as possible all around the diameter. Pushing the peg in with just a little gentle pressure.


Did you read the next sentence? "Don't get the peg out of round."  A slight scuffing should not. This is my experience. The pegs on the inexpensive violin i was servicing had the appearance of plastic. Definately not ebony. Turned out to be heavily coated local wood. I don't believe in peg dope or lube. My personal instruments, the pegs may get adjusted once or twice in the life of the string. All else is adjusted via the fine tuners. I do not change tunings liked some.  

Dec 16, 2019 - 5:11:09 AM

gapbob

USA

649 posts since 4/20/2008

Peg dope is a buffing compound, like that used for polishing jewels. You work the peg dope into the hole until it is polished, wipe off the excess and then string it up.

Dec 16, 2019 - 12:52:22 PM

1422 posts since 12/11/2008

Congrats on giving the fiddle a go! The tuning pegs work simply by twisting the darn things into the neck holes hard enough to allow them to stick while not so hard you can't do any fine adjustments. I've also found that if you use a cloth to put a tiny(!) bit of bow rosin onto the tuning peg, that'll help, too. Welcome to the world of a musical instrument that has essentially remained the same for centuries.

Edited by - Lonesome Fiddler on 12/16/2019 12:53:07

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