Banjo Hangout Logo
Banjo Hangout Logo

Premier Sponsors

54
Fiddle Lovers Online


Want to hide these Google ads? Join the Players Union!
Dec 14, 2019 - 11:42:24 AM
34 posts since 4/15/2019

I keep reading about recording yourself. I am an old timer and don't know much about this modern day stuff. I have a cassette recorder but the music on it sounds awful. What do I need to record myself?

Dec 14, 2019 - 12:26:06 PM
like this

10517 posts since 9/23/2009

If you can spend some money on it, you can buy a home recording studio for maybe couple hundred or so. I don't know much about modern stuff either, but I bought a Presonus, back 10 or 11 years ago...it hooks up to the computer, and then you go online to get the key number logged in, or whatever it's called, so that you activate the software that goes with the little box that plugs into the computer. My husband did all that stuff for me because I have no idea. But buying the Presonus, they have some that come with a mic and headphones, but I got mine cheaper because I already had mics and headphones at home. I think mine cost about 200 or so. I have loved every minute I spent with it. I had a huge learning curve, and didn't really learn much about it besides just knowing how to do basic recording...it has a lot of bells and whistles that I've never taken the time or effort to learn. I learned all I know from youtubes. If you're technically challenged, find a young person to hook all that stuff up and get it running for you...lol...then look up on youtube the basics to get going. I've loved my home recording studio.

Dec 14, 2019 - 12:31:51 PM
likes this

4364 posts since 9/26/2008

By awful, do mean poor quality or unlistenable? Maybe distorted?
If you have a modern cell phone aka “Smart” phone, I recommend an app called RecForge, but heck, the phone probably has a recording or voice memo app already and that should work.

The reason for the suggestion to record is to actually hear what you are doing, timing or pitch for example. You might not need the app. If the cassette makes a poor quality recording but still reflects your timing or intonation, then it will suffice. I just pulled out my original lesson tapes, recorded (and just played back) on a cheap portable unit, the kind where the eject button pushes the cassette and it jumps loose but still lays in there in the machine. After 20 plus years it still sounds good enough to get the melody, but otherwise pretty rough.

If you want much better recording quality, there are a bunch of options from portable recording devices that record digitally onto various storage cards, then onto your computer. There are usb microphones that plug into your computer, or devices that let you plug an old fashioned mic right into the computer (my preferred method). Lots of options.
I’m sure more thorough posts will follow.

Dec 14, 2019 - 12:33:08 PM
likes this

2507 posts since 7/12/2013

If you have a smart phone made in the last 5 years you should be able to make an improved difference from your cassette recorder

Dec 14, 2019 - 1:40:24 PM
likes this

64 posts since 11/24/2018

Or just go to any local electronics store and buy yourself a small digital recorder

Dec 14, 2019 - 1:51:22 PM
like this

34 posts since 4/15/2019

like I said, I don't know much about this modern day stuff' like smart phones. My phone doesn't take pictures or make recordings. Its just something I use when my car breaks down on the rd.

Dec 14, 2019 - 2:39:42 PM
likes this

DougD

USA

9361 posts since 12/2/2007
Online Now

The simplest thing is to buy something like this - its the modern equivalent of the cassette recorder, but with much better sound quality: sweetwater.com/store/detail/DR...-recorder The Zoom brand is also good, and there are others.
Oddly enough, I just bought a nice Sony boombox at Goodwill a couple weeks ago. It has a record button, but its been a long time since I've seen a blank cassette. Kathy Mattea sounds good on playback though, and I'm sure cassettes are still around. It was $8.00.

Dec 14, 2019 - 3:27:54 PM

4364 posts since 9/26/2008

quote:
Originally posted by DougD

The simplest thing is to buy something like this - its the modern equivalent of the cassette recorder, but with much better sound quality: sweetwater.com/store/detail/DR...-recorder The Zoom brand is also good, and there are others.
Oddly enough, I just bought a nice Sony boombox at Goodwill a couple weeks ago. It has a record button, but its been a long time since I've seen a blank cassette. Kathy Mattea sounds good on playback though, and I'm sure cassettes are still around. It was $8.00.


I have one of versions of this very thing. Works great.

Dec 14, 2019 - 7:00:51 PM

Beardog

USA

100 posts since 8/12/2012

I downloaded a free app called "Spire Music Recorder" on my iPhone. It is simple to use, and does a great job. Embarrassingly better than some of the expensive, fussy equipment that I have purchased for my desktop computer over the last few years. Unfortunately, it only is for iPhones and iPads:

Spire

Dec 14, 2019 - 8:32 PM

401 posts since 8/10/2017

You might be able to install Audacity on your computer and record yourself with it. There are also electronic devices you can buy for taking voice memos that will do a good enough job. There's also a more expensive recording device called a Zoom H4n. It's about the size of a walkie-talkie. I have one and it makes really good recordings but it's hard to use compared to my phone, hard to remember the key combos to make the recordings and then sort of hard to get them out of the device. I'm assuming you just want to measure your progress, not make professional recordings.

Dec 15, 2019 - 6:02:40 AM

1703 posts since 10/22/2007

Never did i imagine a device slightly larger than a credit card, would have the quality full-on video, including sound, that the modern smartphone has. Seems strange to call it a phone.

Dec 15, 2019 - 6:37:10 AM
likes this

WyoBob

USA

36 posts since 5/16/2019

I think the smart phone is the "cleanest" solution.  I have a Zoom H1 and it works fine but is more involved.   With a smart phone, you can plug it into your computer and easily transfer files.

Check with your friends to see if they will give you one of there old smartphones that has been deactivated.  Most everyone has old cell phones in a drawer.  You can't make phone calls or text but you can record and listen to recordings you've made (plug in ear buds work great for this).  You can also use a deactivated phone to cruise the net.   You can download music you're interested in and there are free apps that let you slow down tunes, listen to parts of a tune, loop tunes or sections which is great for learning.

Dec 15, 2019 - 3:00:03 PM

34 posts since 4/15/2019

thanks for the advice. I will be looking into some of these things after Christmas.

Hangout Network Help

View All Topics  |  View Categories

0.15625