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playing back up to fiddle tunes

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Dec 1, 2019 - 8:20:02 PM

neily

USA

6 posts since 5/26/2018

looking for dvd like jim wood's beginning fiddle tunes with back up guitar in it -
the guitar in this dvd is great for playing back up to the tunes

Dec 2, 2019 - 2:43:25 AM

Jimbeaux

Germany

293 posts since 5/24/2016

Have you tried these?

Costs money: https://strummachine.com/app 
Free: https://www.oldtimejam.com/start-here/ 

Dec 2, 2019 - 8:09:38 AM

2168 posts since 10/1/2008

This is a good site not free but very good. THe tracks come in several different tempos to aif the learning experience. R/ 

 

https://www.grasstrax.com/

Dec 2, 2019 - 9:32:07 AM

neily

USA

6 posts since 5/26/2018

thanks -
quote:
Originally posted by Jimbeaux

Have you tried these?

Costs money: https://strummachine.com/app 
Free: https://www.oldtimejam.com/start-here/ 


Dec 2, 2019 - 9:32:31 AM

neily

USA

6 posts since 5/26/2018

thanks -

Dec 2, 2019 - 9:39:58 AM

neily

USA

6 posts since 5/26/2018

looking for someone who is playing the fiddle and show the chords to the tune so i can practice my back up guitar to it - neil

Dec 2, 2019 - 10:23:10 AM

2490 posts since 7/12/2013

What speeds are you looking for?

Dec 2, 2019 - 10:28:49 AM
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2490 posts since 7/12/2013

None of these have the chords on the videos, but they are pretty standard tunes, some are slow some are fast, but a lot don't have any backup: youtube.com/playlist?list=PLqf...kla-99fX2

Dec 2, 2019 - 11:31:24 AM

10402 posts since 9/23/2009

Well I feel like I just spent half the day looking through Mark's videos...cool stuff...so nicely done! I hope they help the OPoster! I sure enjoyed them.

Dec 2, 2019 - 11:34:50 AM
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2490 posts since 7/12/2013

THanks GHP! And to the OP, if there is a video you'd like me to put chords ontop of let me know, happy to do one or two for you.

Dec 2, 2019 - 3:11:56 PM
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444 posts since 9/1/2010

I believe the Old Time Jam Machine has the chords listed in the box for all the tunes. Just click "Jam" at the top menu then scroll down to the jam machine and click "fiddle and banjo"...then select a tune and you can play the backup on guitar.

Dec 2, 2019 - 3:26:01 PM

LukeF

USA

8 posts since 10/15/2019

Neil:

This may not be exactly what you're looking for, but it is a guitar instruction book with a CD of bluegrass and folk songs that has Jim Wood and others playing guitar on fiddle tunes. It gives the solo's and the chords. I have it and find it very helpful:
store.acousticguitar.com/colle...ssentials

The same website has an instruction book on just bluegrass tunes but I haven't checked it out.

Dec 2, 2019 - 3:33:54 PM

4144 posts since 6/23/2007

Why not download Youtube videos. Then, using relatively inexpensive software like "The Amazing Slow Downer" you can change the tempo with effecting the key. Or, the software will also change keys. It does lots of useful stuff.

"4k video downloader" is downloadble, free, and doesn't contain nuisance software. You can download most Youtube videos. The "Switch Sound File Converter" is free and downloadable. You can read a downloaded video and extract the audio portion. Then you can play the sound file using the software I mentioned in the previous paragraph.

Most fiddle books I have, and I have shelves full, contain the musical notation and the chord progressions. Some books, like "The Craig Duncan Master Fiddle Solo Collection" contains the music and CHORDS for quite a few fiddle tunes. If you get that book, have it spiral bound. That way heavy usage won't damage the publication.

Play the music using the software, look at the book, and strum away.

Dec 3, 2019 - 7:02:52 AM
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RobBob

USA

2649 posts since 6/26/2007

I started backing fiddle players on guitar and a fairly early age. The art includes keeping good time, bass runs and adhering to the spirit of each tune. Out west they have a different view of backup guitar with jazzier voicings. The Celtic guitarists have another take on what it should be. But all of them keep time and enhance what the fiddler is doing. I'd recommend getting with a fiddler or a couple of fiddlers and learning what they want. There is a good article about it here.

Any old recordings would work if you play along with them but they are kind of static. This is a good guitar and fiddle duet. listen and learn and copy what the guitar player is doing.  Of course only keep what you like.  Hope this helps.

Dec 3, 2019 - 7:12:36 AM

383 posts since 8/10/2017

If you go to Moonshine V's Youtube channel she goes to all the great jam gatherings and videos people playing and she'll get close up so you can see people's fingers. She does sometimes close in on the guitar player so you can see their technique and chords. If you can follow people's chords visually that's something you can do at a real live jam, too. Plus her channel has such great music and such great musicians. I've learned a lot of tunes from her channel.

Dec 3, 2019 - 8:01:40 AM
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172 posts since 7/31/2018

One thing to keep in mind is that there are many chord choices in OT music that are not written in stone. Many are open for interpretation. Some we expect to hear, and if something varies from that, it sounds "wrong" (for example, the V chord in the beginning old Old Jimmy Sutton really makes the tune pop. Using a I chord just doesn't have much effect).

Some things to keep in mind if you are not familiar with the tune:

- listen to the tune at least once through or strum out chords *very lightly and quietly* if need be. Don't jump into it full volume. If it seems the fiddler needs help with a steady beat, a nice steady foot tap or a light tap on the guitar is acceptable.

- defer to the I chord. Staying on that I chord helps you detect when there ARE changes.

- take the simplest approach. Don't try to put in fancy runs until you fully understand the tune, which means not only the chord changes, but the character and phrasing. Runs/moving lines should accentuate the melody, not overpower or take away from it.

- don't assume you know the phrasing for a crooked tune. Even if a guitar player is on beat with a crooked tune, if they are playing the fifth scale step on the first beat and the first scale step on the second beat, it sounds backwards and the tune sounds "off." LISTEN.

- try to stick to the basic I, IV, and V chords. vi chords are sometimes substituted for IV chords (good example, the 4th bar of Booth Shot Lincoln). Try to avoid using vi chords until you really know the tune and its character. Many fiddlers (myself included) don't like a lot of minor chords in OT music and prefer the IV to the vi. Modal tunes often use the major VII (ex: in A modal, a lot of A major to G major progressions)

- defer to the fiddler who leads the tune. Many fiddlers expect this. I, personally, like to hear chord possibilities other than what I know/am used to (how will I know if I like/don't like something unless someone tries it?) I often like to hear a guitarist's interpretation. But if I hear something that I really don't like I will say something like "try a IV there."

- don't be offended by chord suggestions from others, especially the fiddler who leads the tune. We are all students in this thing called life, and what better way to go at it than together.

- HAVE FUN!!

Dec 3, 2019 - 10:53:53 AM
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383 posts since 8/10/2017

Yeah if it's old-time music, please don't put a lot of minor chords and weigh things down.

Here's a great example of a tune where you have to practically flog the guitarists to stop it with the Eminors. Here's where the guitarist is playing the C instead and how great it sounds. E minor just makes it heavy, gloomy and ponderous. Makes you want to kill yourself with the gloom. This is MUCH better without losing any "sophistication" or whatever it is that makes people think minor chords are more "grown-up" than major chords:

youtube.com/watch?v=D1M3A6XVsYE

Dec 9, 2019 - 6:39:57 AM

4144 posts since 6/23/2007

I often use notation to learn a tune. But as far as rhythm goes, I think it is learned by listening and learning. A person can read chord progression and play along with the melody. But I think the real goal is to be able to use our hearing to recognize chords, and develop a mental "feel" for the chord changes that are being made, and for when chords are getting ready to change. This ability takes time and experience. One more thing. Playing more difficult chord progressions will improve knowledge and sometime abilities. One instructional I have said that unless the material you are working on is difficult, you are not learning anything new.

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