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Sep 17, 2019 - 5:46:01 AM
8 posts since 1/12/2019

Having got to grips with playing fifths on consecutive strings, another (and seemingly knottier) problem has raised its head. I’m learning a tune which has an interval of a ninth in it (G on d string to A on e string).

I have no clue how to do this smoothly. Leaving aside the bowing for now, I have tried quickly shifting my third finger across to the new string, flattening the third finger across three strings, and substituting adjacent fingers on either the G or the destination A.

Are any of these approaches on the right track?

Any and all wisdom appreciated, thank you.

Sep 17, 2019 - 6:36:25 AM

2147 posts since 10/1/2008

Hmmm Don't know about wisdom .... I don't know what is going on in the music leading up to this point and where your fingering is at so any answer is likely to be either unlikely or just impossible to reach. If you are able to play the G with your middle finger then the A with your ring finger is possible. Also if you are playing the G with your ring finger your pinky will be able to reach the A. As always finding what works best for you and your hand is how you want to play it. With string playing it is all about where you are coming from and where you have to go that is the tail that wags the dog. R/

Sep 17, 2019 - 9:02:18 AM
like this

Swing

USA

1917 posts since 6/26/2007

Not as bad as you may think, plant your first finger on the D on the A string and the A on the E string... now you are in the third position, then place your ring finger on the G on the D string. If you have small hands or short fingers use your little finger on the D string... If you practice going up the D scale with the closed position of the D and A you will find that all the other notes fall in place....

Play Happy

Swing

Sep 17, 2019 - 1:30:36 PM
like this

1222 posts since 4/6/2014

Only one way to do that on adjacent strings.....1st finger G on the D string, then 4th finger(pinky) A on the A string. Either the harmonic or the fingered note.

Sep 17, 2019 - 11:35:57 PM

1222 posts since 4/6/2014

quote:
Originally posted by pete_fiddle

Only one way to do that on adjacent strings.....1st finger G on the D string, then 4th finger(pinky) A on the A string. Either the harmonic or the fingered note.


Apologies.... You could use different fingering, or get into Monty's Czardas territory and do it on the G and D strings....I should never say "Only one way"...

Sep 18, 2019 - 6:03:49 AM

178 posts since 4/22/2009

What tune is this?

Sep 18, 2019 - 6:56:11 AM

8 posts since 1/12/2019

The tune is Rakes of Kildare: open.spotify.com/track/2hpAi0B...AhVkj3o3g

Sep 18, 2019 - 10:15:04 AM

1222 posts since 4/6/2014

quote:
Originally posted by Rasbob

The tune is Rakes of Kildare: open.spotify.com/track/2hpAi0B...AhVkj3o3g


In that case. i hit the G on the D string and the open G string together, and leave the bottom G ringing while i go for the A note . This disguises the shift (or string crossing)..... Personally i shift, and hit the A note with my second finger so that i have strong fingers to do a turnaround on the A note and cut the high B note with a higher C note played with my 4th finger  (pinky) :0).

Sep 18, 2019 - 11:42:34 AM

8 posts since 1/12/2019

thanks @pete_fiddle ,very cunning, will give that a go.

Edited by - Rasbob on 09/18/2019 11:43:20

Sep 29, 2019 - 1:39:31 AM

8 posts since 1/12/2019

Thanks everyone for your replies. I have been playing around with your suggestions, seems that using a different finger on one string or the other makes sense. At the moment have settled on second finger on the G moving to third on the A as normal...

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