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Jul 22, 2019 - 6:42:19 AM
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58 posts since 11/24/2018

Hey everybody,

In my non musical life, I work in the media. I’m reaching out to you, because the few real old-time fiddlers who are left are aging – in their late 80’s or 90’s. I’ve been wanting to write a book about a few of the old timers. A prominent fiddler recently passed away, so I already missed out on one. I hope to take the time to interview the few that are left. My goal would to eventually publish a book… My aim isn’t to provide analysis on bowing styles and so on and so forth, just write a few short biographies etc.

I’m turning to you guys, because I’m wondering if one could help me elaborate a series of main questions, so that I don’t miss out on any important details.

Jul 22, 2019 - 9:43:14 PM
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2434 posts since 10/6/2008

Have you listened to any of the Get Up in the Cool podcasts? I love them and almost always find the conversations to be interesting. Some are stellar.

If I were reading a book about older old-time fiddlers, the same sort of topics would draw me in. Stories. I’d like to hear their stories.

Edited by - Cyndy on 07/22/2019 21:43:49

Jul 23, 2019 - 6:16:37 AM
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58 posts since 11/24/2018

I listen sometimes, but I've mostly spent the last few months reading every book that I could get my hands on that talks about the history of fiddling in so and so region. I think that I'll be ok, its just that I was hoping that there may be some folklorists or whatever around that might have some tips

Aug 6, 2019 - 11:37:29 AM
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1150 posts since 7/26/2015

What got them interested in playing music? What was life like back then? What advice do they have for the younger generations? How do they want to be remembered?
Those are a few questions that usually get some good responses.
quote:
Originally posted by Hoodoo

Hey everybody,

In my non musical life, I work in the media. I’m reaching out to you, because the few real old-time fiddlers who are left are aging – in their late 80’s or 90’s. I’ve been wanting to write a book about a few of the old timers. A prominent fiddler recently passed away, so I already missed out on one. I hope to take the time to interview the few that are left. My goal would to eventually publish a book… My aim isn’t to provide analysis on bowing styles and so on and so forth, just write a few short biographies etc.

I’m turning to you guys, because I’m wondering if one could help me elaborate a series of main questions, so that I don’t miss out on any important details.


Edited by - soppinthegravy on 08/06/2019 11:40:01

Aug 6, 2019 - 11:52:30 AM
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Old Scratch

Canada

430 posts since 6/22/2016

How did you learn? Who did you learn from? Where did you get your first fiddle? Who were the prominent fiddlers in your area, do/did you (want to) play like them? Where did you get your tunes; do you still play those tunes? Were you encouraged/discouraged? When did you first play in public? How has your playing changed? How has fiddling in your area changed? What do you think of that?

Aug 6, 2019 - 2:08:24 PM

7616 posts since 3/19/2009

I often tell young people, '"Hey, wouldn't it be great if you knew an old fiddler who would sit with you patiently and teach you to play your fiddle? Well, I MIGHT be that guy.. don't let this opportunity slip by (wink)".........

Aug 7, 2019 - 5:12:04 AM

10352 posts since 9/23/2009

I have no advice except to say good luck. I wish you well on the project. I always envision another project where old time music is presented in some way that attracts people to learn it for themselves, experience the joys of folk music in their region and in their own way...and become the newest generation of folk musicians to lead the way. How does that ever happen? One guy in Central KY started to do that with his radio/tv show, Woodsongs Old Time Radio Hour, but unfortunately as time went along and it got more and more popular, it just got weirder and weirder...he does have some kinda program for schools you can subscribe too, but I think it's not oriented toward actual folk music anymore at all. I'd like to see some kinda thing where people gather on a town square, courthouse lawn (if you could convicne them you didn't come armed and dangerous...lol), common store in the area or wherever, and people gather and just learn as they all play together, the old way, the way the old timers learned. I fear it's all dying with the old timers, and that's disturbing to me, because I really believe it's an essential and necessary part of human health and happiness, of fitting in with the community and the world, of relaxing and enjoying life...commerical music is pretty toxic, mostly, and in my own opinion, hurts more than helps people...not in all cases, but most of what's out there does in my opinion. Anyway...it would just be great to see an old timer revival...maybe a good question to ask those old timers...how could it happen...an old time music revival??????

Aug 7, 2019 - 7:31:59 AM

58 posts since 11/24/2018

quote:
Originally posted by groundhogpeggy

I have no advice except to say good luck. I wish you well on the project. I always envision another project where old time music is presented in some way that attracts people to learn it for themselves, experience the joys of folk music in their region and in their own way...and become the newest generation of folk musicians to lead the way. How does that ever happen? One guy in Central KY started to do that with his radio/tv show, Woodsongs Old Time Radio Hour, but unfortunately as time went along and it got more and more popular, it just got weirder and weirder...he does have some kinda program for schools you can subscribe too, but I think it's not oriented toward actual folk music anymore at all. I'd like to see some kinda thing where people gather on a town square, courthouse lawn (if you could convicne them you didn't come armed and dangerous...lol), common store in the area or wherever, and people gather and just learn as they all play together, the old way, the way the old timers learned. I fear it's all dying with the old timers, and that's disturbing to me, because I really believe it's an essential and necessary part of human health and happiness, of fitting in with the community and the world, of relaxing and enjoying life...commerical music is pretty toxic, mostly, and in my own opinion, hurts more than helps people...not in all cases, but most of what's out there does in my opinion. Anyway...it would just be great to see an old timer revival...maybe a good question to ask those old timers...how could it happen...an old time music revival??????


I think that one of the cool things going down in Kentucky has to be the Cowan Creek Music School. I've never been, but from what I've read, it seems like a cool place to hang out : http://cowancreekmusic.org/

Aug 7, 2019 - 10:39:29 AM

10352 posts since 9/23/2009

Yeah that looks pretty cool...I didn't know about that. I'd like to see just neighborhoods all around doing stuff like that.

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