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May 14, 2019 - 1:50:22 PM
3 posts since 5/14/2019

I’m fairly new to the violin, I just got my first one 10 days ago, I’m trying to learn by myself and it’s going quite well. However, I already tuned my violin several times and as I was tuning it today my G string snapped. Now I understand that I should never leave my violin with less than 3 strings and should change my strings one at a time to avoid damaging the sound post. I already ordered new strings as I didn’t have any spares at hand. The problem is that they will take a week to arrive and I’m worried that it will cause problems to my violin. So, what should I do during this week to minimize the damage or prevent it if possible?

May 14, 2019 - 2:14:27 PM
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boxbow

USA

2362 posts since 2/3/2011

It's not going to harm your instrument to stay strung on only 3 strings for a week or a month. Rather than tune it down or fully unstring it, leave it as is. There will be less overall change in tension on the instrument when you put on your new strings.

May 14, 2019 - 6:14:50 PM

3 posts since 5/14/2019

I’m sorry if it sounds obvious but can I still practice on the other strings in the meantime or will it damage the instrument in any form?
Also, do I need to take special care of my instrument or tune it every day or two while I wait for my new strings?

May 14, 2019 - 6:51:40 PM

gapbob

USA

573 posts since 4/20/2008

No special care needed.  Do not loosen the strings, your soundpost might drop.

Note that when a g string breaks, often it is because it is bound up against the peg box, so be careful with how it is strung.

Edited by - gapbob on 05/14/2019 18:52:06

May 15, 2019 - 4:01:18 AM
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boxbow

USA

2362 posts since 2/3/2011

Practice as much as you like or are able to. Lots of fiddle tunes that can be played without the G string. As for tuning, that's always a good idea. Lots of people here will tell you to tune every time you pick up the fiddle. It's too much work to play an out of tune fiddle.

May 15, 2019 - 6:06:05 AM

2072 posts since 10/1/2008

Yup ... play on. Good note above on the string being bound by the peg box. Do keep an eye out for that. Always keep an extra full set of strings in your fiddle case. You can keep an old set too for that matter. R/

May 15, 2019 - 11:37:48 AM

3 posts since 5/14/2019

I didn't really understand what you meant by: "The string is bound by the peg box". Do you mind explaining so I can be aware of that?

Edited by - Aseel on 05/15/2019 11:38:27

May 15, 2019 - 12:07:06 PM

4016 posts since 9/26/2008

The way the string is wound on the peg, if done wrong, can cause the string to come out of the peg box too close to the edge of the box, thus binding the string. Others probably are better and explaining the correct winding method.

May 15, 2019 - 2:09:31 PM
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boxbow

USA

2362 posts since 2/3/2011

The string bends as it comes off the nut and down into the pegbox. The E and G strings can get an additional (this is bad) bend by rubbing the edge of the pegbox on the way by. Where it contacts the peg will determine whether it successfully clears the wall of the pegbox adequately. I've over-corrected for this, myself, and had the string try to pull the peg loose from its tapered hole. So there's a sweet spot in there, but a moment or two of examination and trial and probably not much error, and you'll have it.

It's important to wind the strings onto the pegs in the right way.  I'll bet there are a jilliion u-tubes on the subject.

Edited by - boxbow on 05/15/2019 14:10:53

May 18, 2019 - 6:48:33 AM

219 posts since 9/12/2007

In the future always keep the old strings around when you change strings Just in case of a situation like this.

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