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Calico (AEac#) notation

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Feb 11, 2019 - 6:25:52 AM
7367 posts since 3/19/2009

Tuning a fiddle to AEac# is no big deal and playing tunes with that c# drone are fun to play.. The problem has always been trying to notate on sheet music.
Here is what happened: I've know how to play Greg Canote's tune,  Obama's March to the White House, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VlseV_lIhYs    for many years...sort of....A friend wants to play the tune at an upcoming jam so I decided to double check my version with sheet music available online.
First I found sheet music with three sharps (A)..and found that it was very confusing to play since the notes on the fingerboard don't match the sheet music notation on three of the strings..(the tune is in the key of A) .THEN, I found sheet music in D..two sharps...Now, with this notation I can place my finger exactly where the sheet music indicates and even though the fiddle is in AEac#, the tune comes out exactly correct......CALICO NOTATION.. I'd never heard of it before and am glad I found it.. 

Here is the tune in CALICO NOTATION: https://www.theportlandcollection.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/Obamas-March-PC3-Web.pdf

and here is the tune in Standard Notation:  https://cdn2.hubspot.net/hub/13037/docs/ObamasMarch.pdf

Try to play the tune with each and you'll see what I mean...

Edited by - TuneWeaver on 02/11/2019 08:22:12

Feb 11, 2019 - 8:02 AM
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Baileyb

USA

9 posts since 1/24/2019

Lee, the links to the notation go to the same page.

Feb 11, 2019 - 8:13:04 AM

7367 posts since 3/19/2009

quote:
Originally posted by Baileyb

Lee, the links to the notation go to the same page.


Thanks..Look again..I made a correction.

Edited by - TuneWeaver on 02/11/2019 08:23:13

Feb 11, 2019 - 10:00:07 AM
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4168 posts since 9/26/2008

That is scordatura notation.

Wiki article
 

Feb 11, 2019 - 1:09:35 PM

7367 posts since 3/19/2009

quote:
Originally posted by ChickenMan

That is scordatura notation.

Wiki article
 


Scordatura has come up often on the Hangout.. This calico thingy makes sense.

Feb 11, 2019 - 2:13:19 PM
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2924 posts since 6/21/2007

Just apply it (the theory) to any cross-tuned tune and presto, you have "whatever tuning you're in" scordatura notation.

Feb 11, 2019 - 2:22:21 PM
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7367 posts since 3/19/2009

quote:
Originally posted by BanjoBrad

Just apply it (the theory) to any cross-tuned tune and presto, you have "whatever tuning you're in" scordatura notation.


In the past I wasn't sure how that was done.  Now, I see it clearly...at least for Calico tunes.

Feb 11, 2019 - 10:05:09 PM

98 posts since 7/27/2018

I don't quite understand the D key signature. If you played a scale in AEAC# using D fingerings, the scale from the low A would be, A3, B3, C#4, D#4, E4, F#4, G#4, A4, B4, C#5, D5 C#5, D#5, E5, F#5. Which is neither an A nor D scale, but strangely, an E major scale.

Feb 12, 2019 - 12:10:14 AM

98 posts since 7/27/2018

quote:
Originally posted by Slide

I don't quite understand the D key signature. If you played a scale in AEAC# using D fingerings, the scale from the low A would be, A3, B3, C#4, D#4, E4, F#4, G#4, A4, B4, C#5, D5 C#5, D#5, E5, F#5. Which is neither an A nor D scale, but strangely, an E major scale.


Correction, it's not an E Major scale either.... I was sleepy when thinking that through. Using D fingerings wouldn't play any kind of proper scale. I think they should have just left the key signature with 3 sharps (to let you know that it's still in A) and used accidentals as needed to adjust your fingering so you can read music as if you're in standard still, since no scale patern in standard tuning will make a proper scale in AEAC# tuning.

Edited by - Slide on 02/12/2019 00:11:11

Feb 12, 2019 - 6:02 AM

Jimbeaux

Germany

231 posts since 5/24/2016

quote:
Originally posted by Slide
quote:
Originally posted by Slide

I don't quite understand the D key signature. If you played a scale in AEAC# using D fingerings, the scale from the low A would be, A3, B3, C#4, D#4, E4, F#4, G#4, A4, B4, C#5, D5 C#5, D#5, E5, F#5. Which is neither an A nor D scale, but strangely, an E major scale.


Correction, it's not an E Major scale either.... I was sleepy when thinking that through. Using D fingerings wouldn't play any kind of proper scale. I think they should have just left the key signature with 3 sharps (to let you know that it's still in A) and used accidentals as needed to adjust your fingering so you can read music as if you're in standard still, since no scale patern in standard tuning will make a proper scale in AEAC# tuning.


The places where you put your fingers on the fiddle to play D major in standard tuning are the same places you would put your fingers to play in A major in calico tuning. 

Feb 12, 2019 - 11:52:54 AM

98 posts since 7/27/2018

quote:
Originally posted by Jimbeaux
quote:
Originally posted by Slide
quote:
Originally posted by Slide

I don't quite understand the D key signature. If you played a scale in AEAC# using D fingerings, the scale from the low A would be, A3, B3, C#4, D#4, E4, F#4, G#4, A4, B4, C#5, D5 C#5, D#5, E5, F#5. Which is neither an A nor D scale, but strangely, an E major scale.


Correction, it's not an E Major scale either.... I was sleepy when thinking that through. Using D fingerings wouldn't play any kind of proper scale. I think they should have just left the key signature with 3 sharps (to let you know that it's still in A) and used accidentals as needed to adjust your fingering so you can read music as if you're in standard still, since no scale patern in standard tuning will make a proper scale in AEAC# tuning.


The places where you put your fingers on the fiddle to play D major in standard tuning are the same places you would put your fingers to play in A major in calico tuning. 


I don't believe they are, though. In standard tuning for all the notes of a D scale in first position, you would play the open, G for G3, normal first finger (1) for A3, normal 2nd finger (2) for B3, high 3 (H3) for C#4, then open D for D4, 1 for E4, 2 for F#4, normal 3 (3) for G, open A for A4, 1 for B4, 2 for C#5, 3 for D5, open E for E5, 1 for F#5, low 2 (L2) for G5, and 3 for A5. Repeating the same finger pattern of 0, 1, 2, H3, 0, 1, 2, 3, 0, 1, 2, 3, 0, 1, L2, 3 in Calico tuning would give you this exact sequence of notes:

A3, B3, C#4, D#4, E4, F#4, G#4, A4, A4, B4, C#5, D5, C#5, D#5, E5, F#5. 

Which is not an A scale

Feb 12, 2019 - 12:32:49 PM

7367 posts since 3/19/2009

On the sheet music that I printed off of the internet it says, at the bottom: "Tune Fiddles AEAC#. Play the notation as if in standard tuning. This tune is in the key of A. The two-sharp key signature is for the above cross tuning only."..Does this information help?

Feb 12, 2019 - 12:57:37 PM

4168 posts since 9/26/2008

quote:
Originally posted by Slide
qRepeating the same finger pattern of 0, 1, 2, H3, 0, 1, 2, 3, 0, 1, 2, 3, 0, 1, L2, 3 in Calico tuning would give you this exact sequence of notes:

A3, B3, C#4, D#4, E4, F#4, G#4, A4, A4, B4, C#5, D5, C#5, (D#5), E5, F#5. 

Which is not an A scale


A3 B3 C#4  D4 - "G"string played as if an A tuned string like the "high bass D tuning" which may be the "as if in D" that is being referenced.
E4 F#4 G#4 A4 - "D" string
A4 B4 C#5 D5 - "A" string
C#5 (D#5) E5 F#5 "E" string

The only non A scale note is the D#5 on the high string, but there is no need because the correct D5 note is on the "A" string and the parts played on the "E" string don't require a fingered F5#(D#5), so it is essentially an A scale fingered as if in D. 

The actual D5 note would be fingered as an F5 on the "E" string. I use that note only in one calico/black mountain tuning tune I play and only use it on the last note of "Indian on a Stump" for that nice A4/D5 harmony.

I think it's great that Lee has finally had a breakthrough.  What I would say is you finger as if in cross A but treat the high string as if in D (or A mix).

Feb 12, 2019 - 1:03:43 PM
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98 posts since 7/27/2018

quote:
Originally posted by ChickenMan
quote:
Originally posted by Slide
qRepeating the same finger pattern of 0, 1, 2, H3, 0, 1, 2, 3, 0, 1, 2, 3, 0, 1, L2, 3 in Calico tuning would give you this exact sequence of notes:

A3, B3, C#4, D#4, E4, F#4, G#4, A4, A4, B4, C#5, D5, C#5, (D#5), E5, F#5. 

Which is not an A scale


A3 B3 C#4  D4 - "G"string played as if an A tuned string like the "high bass D tuning" which may be the "as if in D" that is being referenced.
E4 F#4 G#4 A4 - "D" string
A4 B4 C#5 D5 - "A" string
C#5 (D#5) E5 F#5 "E" string

The only non A scale note is the D#5 on the high string, but there is no need because the correct D5 note is on the "A" string and the parts played on the "E" string don't require a fingered F5#(D#5), so it is essentially an A scale fingered as if in D. 

The actual D5 note would be fingered as an F5 on the "E" string. I use that note only in one calico/black mountain tuning tune I play and only use it on the last note of "Indian on a Stump" for that nice A4/D5 harmony.

I think it's great that Lee has finally had a breakthrough.  What I would say is you finger as if in cross A but treat the high string as if in D (or A mix).


I agree that that makes more sense. But I still disgaree with using a D key signature rather than accidentals with an A signature because it adds to confusion for me lol. But if it works for some, I'm glad!

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