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 ARCHIVED TOPIC: Balancing on 1 leg improves your rhythm


Please note this is an archived topic, so it is locked and unable to be replied to. You may, however, start a new topic and refer to this topic with a link: http://www.fiddlehangout.com/archive/57276

alaskafiddler - Posted - 11/03/2022:  11:35:52


The other topic about foot tapping reminded of me this video I came across.



Also relates to thread about standing vs sitting. (IIRC, there was a video of sitting on one butt cheek, which might be related?)





Found interesting, maybe something to it? Does remind me of older local fiddler, Doc South; used to talk about similar idea of being grounded, feel of ground, pelvic base, balance (and why should dance).



As I tried it, I notice it's much easier fro me to balance on left foot and play, not sure why.


Edited by - alaskafiddler on 11/03/2022 11:41:11

RichJ - Posted - 11/03/2022:  14:04:50


Pelvic-shemelvic... lets see him do it when he's 75! Obviously, put together by a 25 year old.

DougD - Posted - 11/03/2022:  14:09:29


Seems too much like a field sobriety test to me.

Earworm - Posted - 11/03/2022:  14:48:16


This is reminding me that I saw a video once about using a balance board to learn to relax your bowing arm. I thought it sounded like a great idea, but can't find the video now.

ChickenMan - Posted - 11/03/2022:  15:31:39


Improving balance can only be beneficial. We as humans are often better with one leg than the other, but practice makes better

Jimbeaux - Posted - 11/04/2022:  03:29:13


I like to do pistol squats and lunges while practicing. That way I keep fit while playing. Once I got carried away and smashed my fiddle trying to do burpees.

carlb - Posted - 11/04/2022:  04:18:51


I do international folk dancing once a week. While not necessarily aerobic, we spend quite a bit of movement that involves standing on one foot. While we're all masked, we touch hands while dancing in a line or a circle. Good for my balance and enjoy moving to the rhythm of the music.

farmerjones - Posted - 11/04/2022:  05:51:21


Our keyboard player stands on one foot, pedals with the other. I tried it. Really couldn't make it through a whole song. For some reason, I can pat my foot playing bass, but I seem to be too busy while fiddlin'. Could be the same about singing and playing fiddle. Not impossible, but mentally taxing seems like.

Lonesome Fiddler - Posted - 11/04/2022:  13:09:18


Standing on one foot ruins my posture and tires out the foot and leg -- causing me enough discomfort and distraction to essentially kill my tone and intonation. It creates shoulder soreness and leg cramps.

boxbow - Posted - 11/04/2022:  14:33:25


I'll try it, but it calls for a spot with absolutely no clutter within 6 feet.

I just got back from my first session on an indoor climbing wall since before Covid. Balance is different now than 25 years ago when I was just about turning 40 and at my peak. Awareness and familiarity of it helps to compensate a lot. So far.

I used to stand and call the end of a tune by holding my foot out for the whole last time through the "B" part. It was fun and cute and all, but it's time is past.

I find that my balance on my left foot is better because my right leg has an active role in counterbalancing. As a right hander (footer?) my right is better at the fussy stuff.

Aaaand from the Too Much Information Department we have the tale of my drinking days when I would undress for bed standing up and in the pitch dark. My ability to do so was somehow proof that I wasn't a drunk. It sure got easier after I quit.

Brian Wood - Posted - 11/04/2022:  15:50:16


I can't see how it would help. The thought and energy going into balancing would seem to be taking it away from playing. Maybe it's related somehow to the idea that tapping your foot will help your timing, which doesn't work for everybody but at least seems plausible. Balancing on one leg for good rhythm just doesn't seem plausible. Maybe we should ask Ian Anderson.

ChickenMan - Posted - 11/04/2022:  16:47:22


But getting good at it, without doing anything else other than standing there, can only be a good thing overall. Especially as we all get a little older and a little less mobile.

alaskafiddler - Posted - 11/05/2022:  13:26:37


Not sure if folks actually watched the video? It's not about performing on one leg... but just an "exercise".



For some folks, initially standing on one leg might be difficult, take thought and energy, but that's kind of the point of exercise, is "develop" awareness of balance and body, so don't have to put much thought and energy into it... simply feel and adjust.



I don't see any downside to developing better awareness of body. core and balance. No matter one's age. As well, good body awareness and balance seems good for preventing injuries. Ironically, standing on one foot is PT exercise to help body alignment and posture issues.



The video (and links) suggests a having poor balance, might affect, interfere with vestibular and sense of timing. Thus extends that to suggest few reasons having better body awareness, feel of balance, from core, grounding, might help musicians and timing. Part is also about how we feel rhythm in our body. Similar in how dancing involves and can increase sense of core, balance and grounding. Another aspect is about helping with focus, being engaged in the moment, which can help with timing. 



Maybe it's related somehow to the idea that tapping your foot will help your timing



Some of this might be related to tapping foot discussions. In that one form of tapping is all about physical engaged feeling the rhythm of time in your whole body... not simply time as cerebral, mentally thinking, calculating/synchronizing, algorithms, perhaps counting; nor only the synchronization in fingers of LH, or arm/wrist movement of RH. The former, feel in whole body, my guess balance and grounding would be important part of that. (possibly not so much for the latter cerebral approach), 



 

alaskafiddler - Posted - 11/05/2022:  13:34:23


quote:

Originally posted by RichJ

Pelvic-shemelvic... lets see him do it when he's 75! Obviously, put together by a 25 year old.






I believe Adam is 35.



I'm 62, don't have any problem standing on one leg. Quite a lot of my friends are in their 70s (a few in 80s), and most don't have a problem; of course most are dancers, and/or active, participate in other recreational exercise. (like biking/skiing, mountain hiking). Knee issues are common though.


Edited by - alaskafiddler on 11/05/2022 13:35:36

RichJ - Posted - 11/05/2022:  14:44:49


quote:

Originally posted by alaskafiddler

quote:

Originally posted by RichJ

Pelvic-shemelvic... lets see him do it when he's 75! Obviously, put together by a 25 year old.






I believe Adam is 35.



I'm 62, don't have any problem standing on one leg. Quite a lot of my friends are in their 70s (a few in 80s), and most don't have a problem; of course most are dancers, and/or active, participate in other recreational exercise. (like biking/skiing, mountain hiking). Knee issues are common though.






Hey Alaska, that's great, but I'll check back with ya' in 20 years. I,m currently 83. Could physically do most everything I wanted through my 60s and 70s. Once I hit 80 things began to slide, Yeah, guess i could still stand on one leg too, but I'd be pretty shaky and wouldn't dare try playing a fiddle in that position rhythm be damned. lol

groundhogpeggy - Posted - 11/05/2022:  19:30:26


Honestly I don't think I ever could've played any instrument while balancing on one leg...ever in my life...lol.

alaskafiddler - Posted - 11/07/2022:  15:45:17


Again might be misunderstanding what the exercise is about. It's not really about holding an instrument, nor as some party trick. Fundamentally is about starting with grounding, body awareness, balance from lower core.  Should mention that probably some folks might not notice difference, as they are pretty well already have that sense of grounded, balance in lower core. (can often observe it in their overall body movement). From that, the idea is that being grounded and balanced, (and vestibular system) possibly has an affect on ability to perceive beat/timing. As video points out, voice teachers uses that exercise, so can try with just singing (no instrument to hold); maybe clapping? 



Or not.



Similar to suggestion of sing and dance could be beneficial; but as grown ups can make their own decision; including simply don't want to.



----------  



Rich - I was just replying, pointing out that don't need to be 25. or that at 75 can't. I'm sure there are many 75 (or younger) that have poor balance. FWIW, lots of PT advocate similar exercises for older folk, building good balance, lowering risk of falling.



 

NCnotes - Posted - 11/08/2022:  06:52:19


There is a science-backed correlation with the ability to balance on one leg, and lifespan...

usatoday.com/story/news/health...97219001/



so if you can fiddle while on one leg, well then you're bound to live to 100! laugh

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