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 ARCHIVED TOPIC: Can too much rosin make the bow skip?


Please note this is an archived topic, so it is locked and unable to be replied to. You may, however, start a new topic and refer to this topic with a link: http://www.fiddlehangout.com/archive/55266

dalevancleef - Posted - 05/21/2021:  14:04:13


First off, I apologize for lurking. I don't yet have the skill or knowledge to offer advice.
Yesterday, I noticed that my bowing was much smoother. Sometimes the bow tends to skip or bounce.
It's getting better. But yesterday, I had no issues whatsoever.
At the end of practice, I realized that I had not rosined the bow.
Typically, before each hour of practice, I rosin the bow with 3 passes in each direction.
Is that too much? And if it is, can that contribute to the bouncing I have been experiencing?
Thanks in advance. Any advice will be appreciated.

RichJ - Posted - 05/21/2021:  14:58:06


Three fiddlers - four opinions on rosin. The brand, how much and how often to apply the stuff has a lot of widely varying opinion. Off the top I'd say your experience yesterday was the result of you improving your bowing technique and had nothing to do with the amount of rosin.

On second thought, I guess most fiddlers would agree a brand new bow (or one recently re-haired) makes no sound at all unless it gets a healthy dose of rosin.

UsuallyPickin - Posted - 05/21/2021:  15:52:23


Hmmmm ... rosin can build up on a bow and get sticky ... I apply rosin when a bow has just been re-haired and when the bow is not grabbing and begins sliding ... The tightness of the bow hair can add bounce and skip to a novice fiddlers bowing .... and as pointed out above your bowing may just be developing a smoother draw.... play on. R/

Brian Wood - Posted - 05/21/2021:  16:25:08


Brian Wood - Posted - 05/21/2021:  16:27:27


Sam Shazaam - Posted - 05/21/2021:  16:45:56


I rosin my bow once a week whether it needs it or not.

Flat_the_3rd_n7th - Posted - 05/21/2021:  18:10:04


quote:

Originally posted by Brian Wood

 






I agree.

Old Scratch - Posted - 05/21/2021:  19:10:20


I wasn't going to post on this, since there are others who know a lot more about the subject, but ... they're MIA. So, until they show up: I've read on this very forum, I'm sure, that if you use a lot of rosin, it can build up and harden, giving the bow-hair a more slippery than sticky surface. Just repeating what I've heard, FWIW.

groundhogpeggy - Posted - 05/21/2021:  19:16:32


Not enough rosin or too much rosin...these are the types of things that make fiddling seem very mysterious when you're sort of new to the whole thing. Seems you can hear a lot of opinions and still have to just figure out what works and what doesn't. But it's true too much rosin can build up and make the bow seem to be skating instead of smooth sailing...you can usually take care of that by wiping off the strings. Too little rosin and you have a similar experience...so...finding that happy place is what you have to do. That, plus just getting used to and comfortable with handling your bow. And you will find it. Then, someone will ask you, and you'll have a lot of trouble trying to explain it to them...lol. Keep fiddling!

The Violin Beautiful - Posted - 05/21/2021:  22:38:45


Too much rosin will make a bow skip. The reason for this is that you get a tone by heating up the rosin through the friction of the hair on the string. As the coating on the string gets thicker, it becomes more difficult to build up the necessary friction to make the string snap back and forth.

The bow uses what’s called slip stick motion—the bow moves and the friction heats the rosin enough to make the bow stick to the string. The string moves until the bond is overcome and it snaps back into place. This happens over and over at such a high rate of speed that we hear it as a continuous tone.

When the rosin isn’t getting the right grip, the slip stick motion breaks down and there’s a loss in friction and therefore sound.

Old Scratch - Posted - 05/22/2021:  08:54:50


There ya go, that's what I was trying to say. I think.

Earworm - Posted - 05/22/2021:  10:07:39


Why not just experiment? No cost, and no one to argue with.

old cowboy - Posted - 05/22/2021:  11:21:47


More than likely the problem is rosin
build up on the strings and not the bow. Keep a rag handy for wiping the strings.

alaskafiddler - Posted - 05/22/2021:  13:53:46


Rosin can be a slight contributing factor, as well how tight the hair, for inexperienced player; generally not for experienced. 



Often issue is more with with inexperience in bow control and balance; weight, pressure, speed; and sometimes timidness is factor.



For example, common at first is not enough pressure/weight and the bow will tend to skip, esp in upper half.



Typically, before each hour of practice, I rosin the bow with 3 passes in each direction. Is that too much?



Procedure seems like could lead over rosining; assumes need to add some fixed amount of rosin to an already rosined bow; even when it probably doesn't. Doesn't take into account how much rosin is on your bow, or how much you actually expend while playing. (depends on type of rosin, aggressiveness, other aspects). Could try rosining less, perhaps not rosining before practice, just when it seems like need to.


Edited by - alaskafiddler on 05/22/2021 14:12:44

alaskafiddler - Posted - 05/22/2021:  14:14:43


quote:

Originally posted by alaskafiddler

Rosin can be a slight contributing factor, as well how tight the hair, for inexperienced player; generally not for experienced. 



Often issue is more with with inexperience in bow control and balance; weight, pressure, speed; and sometimes timidness is factor.



For example, common at first is not enough even pressure/weight and the bow will tend to skip, esp in upper half.



Typically, before each hour of practice, I rosin the bow with 3 passes in each direction. Is that too much?



Procedure seems like could lead over rosining; assumes need to add some fixed amount of rosin to an already rosined bow; even when it probably doesn't. Doesn't take into account how much rosin is on your bow, or how much you actually expend while playing. (depends on type of rosin, aggressiveness, other aspects). Could try rosining less, perhaps not rosining before practice, just when it seems like need to.






 

Dick Hauser - Posted - 07/19/2021:  14:53:47


I would find an experienced player and ask them to offer constructive criticism on my playing technique. I would definitely make sure the problem is correctly diagnosed and I am taking effective corrective action.

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