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 ARCHIVED TOPIC: What tunes are you working on in 'lockdown'??


Please note this is an archived topic, so it is locked and unable to be replied to. You may, however, start a new topic and refer to this topic with a link: http://www.fiddlehangout.com/archive/54377

TuneWeaver - Posted - 12/07/2020:  14:58:25


I'm working on Garfield's Blackberry BLossom, Porter's Reel (still), and Gilsaw..

Howz about YOU?


Edited by - TuneWeaver on 12/07/2020 16:26:03

Fiddler - Posted - 12/07/2020:  16:16:02


Kind of all over the place. Here are a few that I am focusing on.

Stone Mountain Wobble (C)
William King's tune (Trevor Stewart - G)
Trombone Rag (Bb)
Yellow Barber (D) (Never really learned it.)

TuneWeaver - Posted - 12/07/2020:  16:26:39


Kirk, Yellow Barber is worth the effort!!!

mackeagan - Posted - 12/07/2020:  18:10:54


G minor medley: Capt. O'Kane slow air, Paddy Fahy's G minor reel (he didn't name them), Paddy on the Turnpike (aka The Auld Reel).
D minor/major medley: Maids of Mitchelstown, The Bunch of Green Rushes, Hand me Down the Tackle.

farmerjones - Posted - 12/07/2020:  18:41:48


Beaumont Rag. Not a re-learn. I never did learnt it. I thought it was in F. Nope.

BTW, what is that one in F?

Lot of tunes to keep played. I ain't keeping up.

irfiddler - Posted - 12/07/2020:  19:14:43


New Camptown Races in Bb
Sally Goodun... a work in progress
Kentucky Waltz in D ..trying to get those beautiful sliding double stops in tune
East Tennessee Blues
Working on Fiddle intros and Fills , especially when backing up a singer.
AND...working on closed position bluegrass breaks. Boy..that is HARD to get those double stops in perfect tune up and down the neck in different keys. Not sure I'll ever master it!

Flat_the_3rd_n7th - Posted - 12/07/2020:  19:21:31


No lockdown here. Still playing with my buds twice a week, waiting for some folks to play for besides the livestock and dogs.

But, as far as new--

Tunes: Gold Rush, Black Mtn Rag, Wheel Hoss, Road to Columbus

Songs: Y'all Come, Walk Softly On This Heart of Mine, There Stands the Glass, Highway 40 Blues

Flat_the_3rd_n7th - Posted - 12/07/2020:  19:30:38


quote:

Originally posted by farmerjones

Beaumont Rag. Not a re-learn. I never did learnt it. I thought it was in F. Nope.



BTW, what is that one in F?



Lot of tunes to keep played. I ain't keeping up.






I don't know a rag in Fmaj, but they say Fisher's Hornpipe used to be played in Fmaj.



Tune you're thinking of might also be in Dm or G 'modal' (dorian).  All have one flat.

Humbled by this instrument - Posted - 12/07/2020:  19:44:14


Different versions of "Auldt Joe Clarke" and "Soldier's Joy."

And I'm singing as I play "Drunken Sailor" and mix it with parts of "Drowsy Maggie."

Fiddler - Posted - 12/07/2020:  20:59:01


quote:

Originally posted by TuneWeaver

Kirk, Yellow Barber is worth the effort!!!






Lee, I have played at it and all around it for 40 years - every since I got that Buddy Thomas "Kitty Puss" record. I like the tune. I have never gotten to the point that I can play it alone and make it sound like a recognizable version. It's about time to rectify that.

Fiddler - Posted - 12/07/2020:  21:01:19


FWIW - Fisher's Hornpipe lays out well in F. In fact, I think it is actually easier to play. The problem is that banjo players, and some fiddle players, give you the stink eye whenever you want to play in F.

DougD - Posted - 12/08/2020:  01:07:09


farmerjones - "that one in F" is "Beaumont Rag," oddly enough: youtu.be/7Fa760-7XMA
Yep, Bob Wills played it there too. The guitar players (Doc Watson I think) moved it to D so they could have fun too.

DougD - Posted - 12/08/2020:  01:24:32


PS - The East Texas Serenaders early recording is in C: youtu.be/irNd5s69gs0

stumpkicker - Posted - 12/08/2020:  04:09:17


You might remember earlier posting where I asked about how to custom slow down of Kenny Baker video of Jerusalem ridge. Well I can play along with it at Kenny speed of 110 bpm except for the D part, which I play at 100. Also, trying to play along with the Skipping Stones video of still “I’m Traveling Along “was giving me fits until I contacted the fiddler who kindly explained to me that the Mississippi sheiks fiddle it in between D and E flat! So I had to tweak my 2nd fiddle to match that tuning.


Edited by - stumpkicker on 12/08/2020 04:09:53

farmerjones - Posted - 12/08/2020:  06:14:58


Fischer's, yes. Strangely, i learned Fischer's from the Fiddlers Fakebook, in D, maybe. But as i remember somebody mentioned the F version.

As far as Bob Wills, i could imagine anything. I learned my version of Beaumont from a very late "Keepsake" recording from Mr. Wills, in D. But he was a fan of Bb, i recon because he had horns in his band often.

Wish i could slip down to Arkansas. I could melt into a jam like that. ?

TuneWeaver - Posted - 12/08/2020:  09:11:00


quote:

Originally posted by stumpkicker

You might remember earlier posting where I asked about how to custom slow down of Kenny Baker video of Jerusalem ridge. Well I can play along with it at Kenny speed of 110 bpm except for the D part, which I play at 100. Also, trying to play along with the Skipping Stones video of still “I’m Traveling Along “was giving me fits until I contacted the fiddler who kindly explained to me that the Mississippi sheiks fiddle it in between D and E flat! So I had to tweak my 2nd fiddle to match that tuning.






I've also been revisiting Jerusalem Ridge during Lockdown.... I had played it SO many time while learning it that I pretty much got burned out on it.. Now that I'm comfortable with it I'm trying to do my own variations.. No, I can't keep up with Kenny, but I have managed at least to keep a good  'flow' of phrases.

Lonesome Fiddler - Posted - 12/08/2020:  12:48:35


I work on any tune that enters my head, no matter what the genre is. I'm also getting my fingers comfortable with scales where the tonic is either a half-step above the nut, or is at the minor third above the nut. Yeah, most of us are pretty comfortable with C, so why not try C scale fingering starting on another string? Depending on what string you start with, you're suddenly playing in F and Bb (I'm talking first position, of course). It's slow going but I'm working on position shifts, trying to make them natural and intuitive. I work on my bowing. Is all this paying off? Who knows?

groundhogpeggy - Posted - 12/08/2020:  14:01:48


Well it seems there's little time for music so I never work on anything unless I'm recording it on my presonus. But TODAY...hurray...I did get a minute while waiting for the last butternut squash to bake...picked up a fiddle and began going crazy (for me at least) with Ragtime Annie...it was a healthy wrist/arm moment...a happy wrist/arm moment...I was bowing the thing as fast as i could and even double shuffling in there a few times...lol...then I thought...should record that one as a happy wrist tune very soon. But of course when I start recording it might not come out so good. But regardless of time, working on whatever...it made me very happy for having my wrist going good now. I mean, it started out so slow and bad, and once it started getting better, just seems each day is a day of huge improvement...gonna try clawhammer in about two weeks...clawhammer and driving...we have only stick shifts and the traffic around here is horrible...so...driving is like clawhammer...both coming soon...but yeah...am I off topic? Spent about 15 minutes sawing the daylights outta Ragtime Annie today. It was a happy wrist moment for me.

Flat_the_3rd_n7th - Posted - 12/08/2020:  16:50:49


quote:

Originally posted by Lonesome Fiddler

I work on any tune that enters my head, no matter what the genre is. I'm also getting my fingers comfortable with scales where the tonic is either a half-step above the nut, or is at the minor third above the nut. Yeah, most of us are pretty comfortable with C, so why not try C scale fingering starting on another string? Depending on what string you start with, you're suddenly playing in F and Bb (I'm talking first position, of course). It's slow going but I'm working on position shifts, trying to make them natural and intuitive. I work on my bowing. Is all this paying off? Who knows?






Hear, Hear!



Once I was a wind-up toy enslaved to musical notation.  Now, I'm a BIG fan of patterns.  Learn the checkerboard pattern on the fiddle, and you can play any tune in any key.  Just gotta be willing to shift sometimes and use the pinky...

bf - Posted - 12/08/2020:  17:56:33


I’ve been working through Jimmy Wheeler’s field recordings. Going Back to Old Kentucky, Cauliflower, Turkey in the Pea Patch, and Blind Steer in the Mudhole are coming along. I started on Martha Campbell last night.

TuneWeaver - Posted - 12/08/2020:  19:12:58


quote:

Originally posted by Flat_the_3rd_n7th

quote:

Originally posted by Lonesome Fiddler

I work on any tune that enters my head, no matter what the genre is. I'm also getting my fingers comfortable with scales where the tonic is either a half-step above the nut, or is at the minor third above the nut. Yeah, most of us are pretty comfortable with C, so why not try C scale fingering starting on another string? Depending on what string you start with, you're suddenly playing in F and Bb (I'm talking first position, of course). It's slow going but I'm working on position shifts, trying to make them natural and intuitive. I work on my bowing. Is all this paying off? Who knows?






Hear, Hear!



Once I was a wind-up toy enslaved to musical notation.  Now, I'm a BIG fan of patterns.  Learn the checkerboard pattern on the fiddle, and you can play any tune in any key.  Just gotta be willing to shift sometimes and use the pinky...






"Be this madness, there is method in it." (from Hamlet) ... Shifting strings, and moving the basic finger patterns up and down the neck....Nothin' to it!!!!    Whould you have made this discovery if you weren't in lock down???



 


Edited by - TuneWeaver on 12/08/2020 19:13:44

Flat_the_3rd_n7th - Posted - 12/08/2020:  19:37:20


quote:

Originally posted by TuneWeaver

 


"Be this madness, there is method in it." (from Hamlet) ... Shifting strings, and moving the basic finger patterns up and down the neck....Nothin' to it!!!!    Whould you have made this discovery if you weren't in lock down???



 






Shifting up and down the neck is kinda scary at first...then you pick up a mandolin and go, what's the big deal



And, no I made this discovery well before lock down--back when somebody called Folsom Prison Blues in F or something, and I thought, "what the crap?", then realized that's just standard +1



Just that Lonesome Fiddler brought up one of my favorite subjects--patterns...half the time I don't know what note I'm playing (which in the notation-reading days was a big deal), simply that it's a layout progression in this-or-that shape



 


Edited by - Flat_the_3rd_n7th on 12/08/2020 19:39:35

fiddlewood - Posted - 12/08/2020:  20:17:11


First Day in Town
Brown Skinned Gal
Right or Wrong
Flopareno
Lone Star Rag
Done Gone
& some others...

farmerjones - Posted - 12/08/2020:  20:19:22


quote:

Originally posted by Flat_the_3rd_n7th

Just that Lonesome Fiddler brought up one of my favorite subjects--patterns...half the time I don't know what note I'm playing (which in the notation-reading days was a big deal), simply that it's a layout progression in this-or-that shape






I stole much of this from Jazzmando.com/FFcP. ( stands for Four Finger closed Position)



But more recently I feel now like I literally grasp the neck a certain way for each key. 

ChickenMan - Posted - 12/09/2020:  09:13:18


I've been writing a C tune for a couple of months. Started with a title, if you can believe that, and the gist of the coarse part popped out pretty quickly followed eventually by a fine part. I've even notated it but it evolved some since then. It is inspired by my new dog (since January) and is called "Jump Reggie, Jump."

Fischer's - I initially learned it in D because that is where it is commonly played (and easiest for most). Then I read that the old timers played out of G (Emmett Lundy comes to mind) and so I learned it there. THEN I saw that it is played in F too so learned it there as well. I think I prefer G but F is for "fun" so I like to start there and modulate up to G. Need to practice those again.

Flat_the_3rd_n7th - Posted - 12/09/2020:  10:01:24


Farmer, thanks for the jazzmando link--nice to see a reference written down...

I, too am trying my hand at a little music composition, but I don't have many original ideas for the melody part. The current one will be bloozy moderate 3/4 time, kind of like Del McCoury's version of Lonesome Wind. Titled "Last Drop from the Still," storyline of how traditional ways seem to be losing favor and going away.

A silly one we're doing for Christmas is "Frosty the Snowman of Constant Sorrow." Just cram the Frosty lyrics into "Man of Constant Sorrow." It's pretty funny...

Randy Rosinbow - Posted - 12/09/2020:  14:38:57


I try to work through everything on this list every few days.


bulltrout - Posted - 12/09/2020:  14:41:22


I’ve been learning a few more O’Carolan tunes, including Planxty Nancy McDermot and Maggie Brown’s Favorite. I’ve also picked up a couple session standards: Maids of Mount Kisco and Dublin Reel. But probably my time best spent has been on recasting tunes I’ve played for years: noodling around with my bowing and ornamentation and such.

TuneWeaver - Posted - 12/09/2020:  14:57:36


quote:

Originally posted by Randy4string

I try to work through everything on this list every few days.






WOW.. You are a busy boy..



 

bulltrout - Posted - 12/09/2020:  15:37:16


Got lots of time on my hands these days.


Edited by - bulltrout on 12/09/2020 15:37:56

sbhikes2 - Posted - 12/10/2020:  07:11:53


I've been working on the Happy Farmer from Suzuki book 1 and Anything for John Joe? and The Peeler's Jacket from the Matt Cranitch Irish fiddle book.

With the Irish tunes I'm trying to not just bow anywhichway like I normally would do but follow his bowings as directed. I'm getting there. It is hard. But it sounds great.

With the Happy Farmer, well my formal violin lesson time ran over and I got no new assignment so I decided what I would do is really try to use that tune to focus on bowing from my elbow instead of my shoulder. I still have not been able to break that bad habit. My teacher recommended scales to practice bowing from my elbow but it seems to me that stuff I learn via scales gets thrown out the window on tunes.

I think after this month I might quit the violin lessons. They are starting to feel like my childhood piano lessons. I am too dumb to learn whatever it is they are wanting me to learn. The echos of my old piano teacher calling me a dummy ring in my head. My violin teacher did not call me a dummy, I feel it coming from myself.

TuneWeaver - Posted - 12/10/2020:  09:51:34


Diane, trust me, the first 40 years are hard and then it get easier..laugh Just kidding of course, but my point is .. Don't give up...Keep at it..  Also, I played the Happy Farmer out of my kid's Suzuki book.. I got through  to book three with the help of a teacher...so when I say I'm self taught, I'm referring to OT fiddle style.. I DID have help learning the basics but I  played on my own for 12 years before I asked that teacher to help me.... I do remember one day the Suzuki Teacher  (classically trained)  saying, "Boy, I wish I could just Fiddle."... Make the best of lockdown!!!


Edited by - TuneWeaver on 12/10/2020 10:04:09

Fiddler - Posted - 12/10/2020:  11:30:19


quote:

Originally posted by sbhikes2

I've been working on the Happy Farmer from Suzuki book 1 and Anything for John Joe? and The Peeler's Jacket from the Matt Cranitch Irish fiddle book.



With the Irish tunes I'm trying to not just bow anywhichway like I normally would do but follow his bowings as directed. I'm getting there. It is hard. But it sounds great.



With the Happy Farmer, well my formal violin lesson time ran over and I got no new assignment so I decided what I would do is really try to use that tune to focus on bowing from my elbow instead of my shoulder. I still have not been able to break that bad habit. My teacher recommended scales to practice bowing from my elbow but it seems to me that stuff I learn via scales gets thrown out the window on tunes.



I think after this month I might quit the violin lessons. They are starting to feel like my childhood piano lessons. I am too dumb to learn whatever it is they are wanting me to learn. The echos of my old piano teacher calling me a dummy ring in my head. My violin teacher did not call me a dummy, I feel it coming from myself.






Diane, something that really helped me with bowing when I was starting was to make my bow arm immobile. I did this by placing my elbow on the arm of my couch and then playing tunes using only my wrist and the limited movement of my forearm. I sounded horrible, but it worked.



I was a former child prodigy on piano (according to my Mom) and was to be heir-apparent to VanCliburn. I successfully resisted and ended a promising career as a concert pianist. I first took took lessons from a nun. She wielded a ruler and would whack the back of my hands if my posture wasn't right or if I did follow the scale pattern properly. I was relieved when Dad took a new job and we moved away. My new teacher was even worse - no rulers, but intense verbal intimidation. Good grief!!



Sounds like you are making the best of COVID lockdown. Stay safe!

sbhikes2 - Posted - 12/10/2020:  15:04:27


The last lesson I had didn't go very well. We will see how today's goes.

I gotta tell you that sight-reading from a book is HELL.

TuneWeaver - Posted - 12/10/2020:  15:11:50


quote:

Originally posted by sbhikes2

The last lesson I had didn't go very well. We will see how today's goes.



I gotta tell you that sight-reading from a book is HELL.






HELL,,, but well worth the effort..



 

bsed - Posted - 12/10/2020:  15:23:19


Since the lockdown started in March, I have learned over 40 tunes. I try to play through them 10-12 a day to keep them in memory.



The latest:



A Metis tune called the Devil's Waltz.



Patt and Possum's Waltz, written by Liz Carroll



Clyde Davenport's Lost Girl (no relation to Salyer's Lost Girl)



 



Speaking of Liz Carroll, Charlie 'Possum' Walden said that Liz had just published a book of her tunes, which I purchased straight away and downloaded. Find it at lizcarroll.com.

ChickenMan - Posted - 12/10/2020:  17:28:34


I feel like such a fiddle slacker. I haven't really been on lock down though. The only thing that has changed about my "not at work time" is a lack of social playing. :-(



Oh, I did get asked to play at two different studios on a total of 4 song tracks, which was fun and gave me something to learn and practice. Not very social though; it was just me and the recording engineer. The the songs were each quirky in their own way as they were written by guitar players who don't usually play with others - odd measures, short phrases, almost like crooked fiddle tunes but less catchy.

:-D



I miss dances.



On the up side, I'm still married and we are tighter than ever!


Edited by - ChickenMan on 12/10/2020 17:29:38

TuneWeaver - Posted - 12/10/2020:  17:32:59


quote:

Originally posted by ChickenMan

I feel like such a fiddle slacker. I haven't really been on lock down though. The only thing that has changed about my "not at work time" is a lack of social playing. :-(



Oh, I did get asked to play at two different studios on a total of 4 song tracks, which was fun and gave me something to learn and practice. Not very social though; it was just me and the recording engineer. The the songs were each quirky in their own way as they were written by guitar players who don't usually play with others - odd measures, short phrases, almost like crooked fiddle tunes but less catchy.

:-D



I miss dances.



On the up side, I'm still married and we are tighter than ever!






Bridgette is a 'keeper'... Mind you ps and qs!!wink

TuneWeaver - Posted - 12/10/2020:  18:57:32


quote:

Originally posted by bsed

Since the lockdown started in March, I have learned over 40 tunes. I try to play through them 10-12 a day to keep them in memory.



The latest:



A Metis tune called the Devil's Waltz.



Patt and Possum's Waltz, written by Liz Carroll



Clyde Davenport's Lost Girl (no relation to Salyer's Lost Girl)



 



Speaking of Liz Carroll, Charlie 'Possum' Walden said that Liz had just published a book of her tunes, which I purchased straight away and downloaded. Find it at lizcarroll.com.






Bruce is lockdown having you play a lot more Celtic music? or are you mostly sticking to OT????   (back in the 80s, I was inspired by Liz Caroll.. she is amazing).....

farmerjones - Posted - 12/10/2020:  20:08:26


Just talked with my Dad(85). He wants another "disk." I put all the stuff i posted last year on a DVD for him. I said, "Sure." Guess what? I just created a project for myself. So I'm going to produce a "disc" basically like what you (me) would want but can't buy today. The more I think about it, the more pumped I'm getting. The only original content might be an off-the-cuff waltz, I am locally famous for.
Now, I gotta plan a release party. Videos. Fortunately, no tour. If you want to get live updates on this project, subscribe to. . . Seriously?

bsed - Posted - 12/11/2020:  07:25:41


quote:

Originally posted by TuneWeaver

quote:

Originally posted by bsed

Since the lockdown started in March, I have learned over 40 tunes. I try to play through them 10-12 a day to keep them in memory.



The latest:



A Metis tune called the Devil's Waltz.



Patt and Possum's Waltz, written by Liz Carroll



Clyde Davenport's Lost Girl (no relation to Salyer's Lost Girl)



 



Speaking of Liz Carroll, Charlie 'Possum' Walden said that Liz had just published a book of her tunes, which I purchased straight away and downloaded. Find it at lizcarroll.com.






Bruce is lockdown having you play a lot more Celtic music? or are you mostly sticking to OT????   (back in the 80s, I was inspired by Liz Caroll.. she is amazing).....






Almost all OT. But I've always had a goal to learn more of Liz's tunes. 



Oh, and I've been playing over Music For A Found Harmonium. Fun!

sbhikes2 - Posted - 12/11/2020:  16:42:09


I am finding that at least for Anything for John Joe and Peeler's Jacket, playing them over and over slow, then trying to play fast without looking, I might mess up some of the marked slurs but overall, I get the gist of where the down bows and up bows in relation to the beat should be. And it sounds so cool to be able to bow a rhythm with lift. This makes me very happy.

RinconMtnErnie - Posted - 12/21/2020:  18:29:26


I do have a list, which includes newer tunes for me like Irish Cobbler, Constitution Hornpipe and an anonymous version of Paddy Don't You Want Some Good Old Cider that I particularly like. It includes older tunes for me like Ross's Reel #4 and Fiddlin' Phil. Mostly I am generally working on overall cleanup of noting and bowing to improve tone. Maybe I'll commit to playing with a TUF grip, which I like except I find it harder to play with a flat hair ribbon, as I naturally tilt the bow a little with that grip. On one hand I definitely get better. On the other hand there are tunes I have worked on so much over the years I should be able to play them masterfully, but I can't. I dig out The Irish Washerwoman periodically and I still can't play it absolutely cleanly.

Lonesome Fiddler - Posted - 12/22/2020:  00:10:00


I'm trying to make myself comfortable in Bb, Eb, F and such. I'm sure I've mentioned this but I practice shifts to third and fifth position. I work on keeping my bow at 90 degrees. Yeah, it's tough. I work on tone. If a tune comes into my head, from whatever part of the universe it might be from, I try to do it.

RB-1 - Posted - 01/04/2021:  01:48:23


Working on the harmony part of Lonesome Moonlight Waltz.



Slowly getting there...laugh

banjopaolo - Posted - 01/04/2021:  02:43:48


During this lockdown I decided to make some videos of my own composition, with a new softwhere I had fun in editing the video of the multitrack recordings, this is one of my favourite


pete_fiddle - Posted - 01/04/2021:  08:06:57


A bunch of English Hornpipes from the 1700's. Had a great time looking at old maps and reading stuff about Georgian London, loads of Gin, Crime, Horrid Murder, Pirates, Hero's and villains etc, all springing from the titles of the tunes.



"Paddington Fair" The revelries that went on at Tyburn on execution day all along Oxford Street



"Nibbs's Pound" From "His Nibbs" a derogatory term for an aristocrat, and "incidentally" directly opposite "Hoggs Pound" (a pound to confine Feral pigs). And also a site of  'An'Orrible Murder. and close to Hannover Square.



"Bob Perry's" Who along with "Oyster Nan"  (an 'oyster girl' was slang for a prostitute), danced the St Giles Hornpipe and drunk "China root Beer", (a cure for venereal disease).



"Ratcliffe Cross" At the top of the infamous Ratcliffe Highway. The site for sailors various on shore pursuits, and notorious for all sorts of 'Orrible Crimes.



And "Hannover Hole" a Basin for turning ships and and laying at anchor. On the opposite side of the river to Ratcliffe



All in flat keys and apart from "Nibbs's Pound" and "Paddington Fair"  3/2  time, or triple hornpipes. From HERE

 

christym - Posted - 01/04/2021:  08:49:35


At the beginning of the pandemic, I was still recovering from frozen shoulder (left-side). So, I worked on old-time guitar -- mostly playing along with the Canote Brothers stringband class recordings (see mossyroof website) and accompanying tab. Since late summer with my shoulder mostly healed, I'm back on fiddle working on various old-time tunes including:

• "Golden Chain Tree" (Kimble family via Suzy Thompson)
• "Soapsuds Over the Fence" (Mac Blalock via James Bryan)
• fiddle-seconding on "Shuffle Creek" from Tricia Spencer's album
• "Jenny on the Railroad" (Carter Brothers and Son, via Bragger and Platz)

Next up:
• "Mississippi Snag" (Nile Wilson via Sally Jablonsky)
• "Radio Song" (Clyde Davenport via Karen Heil)
• "Leland Waltz" (Tim Foss)
• "Walking Back to Texas" (Greg Canote via Sally Jablonsky)


Edited by - christym on 01/04/2021 08:59:19

bubbaschnell - Posted - 01/04/2021:  19:17:28


Well, I figured I better chime in on this, if nothing less, to keep up on my typing skills:

Shipping Port from Burl Hammons, Acorn Hill Breakdown from Tommy Jackson and James Bryan, a whole bunch of tunes from the Coles/Ryan Collection but focusing on ones played by various KY fiddlers (Lem Isom, Alfred Bailey, Tom Riley and George Hawkins), Uncle Bob Walters, and that Portsmouth Ohio gang (Buddy Thomas, Harold Zimmerman, Forrest Pick, Jimmy Wheeler, et al.). Also, I've been dabbling in the music of Howdy Forrester and Kenny Baker, mostly from listening to versions of their tunes filtered by James Bryan. So much good music, so little time.

farmerjones - Posted - 01/04/2021:  20:17:36


After one track I found out I suck. Now, after the new year I will work on getting my chops back. But having fun with fingerstyle guitar.
Just because of that one thread (you know the one) I gave Cherokee Shuffle a spin. Didn't sound too bad if I say so myself. But I couldn't make a comp track for it. Fingerstyle guitar isn't for comping, and I can't flatpick that fast. Maybe it's fine on it's own?

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