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 ARCHIVED TOPIC: Hangout Lite?


Please note this is an archived topic, so it is locked and unable to be replied to. You may, however, start a new topic and refer to this topic with a link: http://www.fiddlehangout.com/archive/54019

Brian Wood - Posted - 09/06/2020:  16:51:00


While I was working on a transcription of an Ed Haley tune this afternoon I took a break and did a Google search about his bowing. Up came this archived thread from Fiddle Hangout.



fiddlehangout.com/archive/4916



It's a fascinating exchange. There are some names in there I haven't seen for quite a while, too. What happened to Glenn Godsey for instance? What a wonderful resource he was.



I'm missing the real meat and potatoes of the hangout's earlier times. I had almost forgotten how interesting it used to be.

ChickenMan - Posted - 09/06/2020:  17:12:58


Glenn posts on Facebook. "Dedicated to Old Time Music" is one page I see him. I agree, the users have thinned these days. Quite a few have passed: bj, fiddlepogo, OTJunky, fujers... that's four off the top of my head. Others are on Facebook - for more "real time conversation" was why one person switched focus.

farmerjones - Posted - 09/06/2020:  18:10:49


I hear you BW. Just name your rabbit hole, i'm in.

ChickenMan - Posted - 09/06/2020:  19:19:28


I think that thread was my very first posting! Wow, and I did not remember that it was Ed Haley that brought me here.

TuneWeaver - Posted - 09/07/2020:  04:40:25


quote:

Originally posted by ChickenMan

I think that thread was my very first posting! Wow, and I did not remember that it was Ed Haley that brought me here.






Don't think about leaving either.. !!

fiddlerjoebob - Posted - 09/07/2020:  05:37:24


I too have thinned my visitations. I used to check once a day. Lately it’s once a month. I learned so much those first five years. It changed my fiddling for the better in many ways and even changed my direction.

I think now I’m just enjoying the playing and worrying less if I got it right.

I just finished a three week bicycle trip around Vermont with my fiddle. I played tunes everywhere. For anyone, or on the top of a mountain or along the side of a remote lake where there was nobody but me and the loons. I’m going to write about it this winter. I will post a link here. It was wonderful.

groundhogpeggy - Posted - 09/07/2020:  07:28:58


That sounds like a really nice experience, FJoebob. I look forward to reading about it.

I learned so much here in the beginning too...I think maybe around 2009 I joined...with a lot of guitar and banjo experience behind me and very slight on and off fiddling and also some conversation with older fiddlers that registered in my mind...although it just never worked out for me to get and have time to really try fiddling until 2009. I was ready and willing to jump into the conversation and hear all sides of everything fiddling as much as possible because I felt like time on earth was running short for me to have to figure it all out without some helpful hints. There was always a lot to think about back then...try things in my klunky clumsiness on the fiddle only to bring up something new and possibly that might go on for pages...I do believe all the conversation here catapulted my playing to catch me up to as good as I coulda been if i'd have had the opportunity to get started playing earlier in my life...close anyway. I'm guessin' I'm about as good on the fiddle as I am on the guitar now after 60 years with guitar...which ain't saying much, since I forgot half of what I used to play on the guitar by now...but I mean...I play most of what I wanna play...my expectations are pretty low, though....lol. Anyway, without the old conversations on FHO back when I first retired...I'm sure I'd still be in a bad struggle, instead of enjoying what I can do by this point.

I think it seems you always think of the people who showed you things on an instruments here and there...I don't mean teachers...well, maybe...I never wanted anybody confining me into their technique or thought patterns though, so I don't know. But I mean for self-directed learners...those moments when you asked, "how are you getting this lick," or whatever, and they showed you...then you went home and tried it...maybe never got it exact, but got something out of it you could use for lots of things. To this day, I still remember in my mind the nice folks who stopped and showed me those things on guitar or banjo.

But in this day and age and with the fiddle, it's been mainly cyberspace people who have helped me along. That's a weirder thing, since you can't imagine the faces or individuals, but mainly participants on a forum...lol. So I think collectively of long threads of many particpants and a small handful of individuals...that's just different...but that's our day and age. There were individuals in the past who gave me a few answers on fiddling, but since I didn't have an instrument and just no chance to get going at it...it's so vague i don't know if I'm utilizing what they showed me or not...it's mainly a cyberspace conglomerate...which is weirder than how I learned banjo and guitar...but...I'm grateful for it, because it has been so helpful to me and I'm sure to others.

If I knew others I could likewise help, I sure would...but I don't know one single person interested and I have such little experience at fiddling...guess maybe if I live to see 100 times and situations could change...lol. Anyway...the conversation just isn't really the same here, which I rambled around quite a bit to say...sorry...time to go to the woods for a hike...maybe that'll get my thoughts to knit together a little better...lol.

DougD - Posted - 09/07/2020:  08:53:40


Now there was a bowing thread! I really miss OTJunky and M-D and some of the others. I was surprised at how many members in that thread are still around (some with different handles) but just don't post much. Its hard to get a word in edgewise sometimes.
Another difference is that a lot of the participants in that thread learned to play more traditionally and actually knew the people we were talking about. Glenn Godsey knew Eck Robertson! Even I watched Clark Kessinger play in a little jam session in 1968, and somewhere I have a picture of me with Lowe Stokes.
Nowadays a lot of members just learned at their local weekly jam session or maybe Clifftop. The music is much different in repertoire, style and approach. Oh well, at least people are enjoying themselves.

DougD - Posted - 09/07/2020:  09:21:02


BTW, Doc Roberts was mentioned in that old thread as a "longbow" fiddler. There is video of him playing at Berea: youtu.be/8wZ5DI4Ns3U Unfortunately (at least from my perspective) after he plays "Tennessee Wagoner" most of the hour is Asa Martin and James Roberts singing sentimental songs.

Fiddler - Posted - 09/07/2020:  11:02:46


FWIW - I was one of the first to join FHO. That's how I was able to get my alias. There was another board - Sugar in the Gourd. I had some wonder discussions with Michael Stringer (Pogo). I think we both migrated here at about the same time when SiG announced that they were going to discontinue the discussion board.

I have enjoyed some great insights into the music, music theory and playing techniques. Yes, there have been those trolls who thrived on getting folks worked up, but much of that has subsided - mostly due to the vigilence and dedication of the moderators and Eric.

Thanks to everyone for making this a valuable resource for traditional fiddling - regardless of the style.

WyoBob - Posted - 09/07/2020:  16:41:45


Brian mentions Glen Godsey.  I ran across his posts searching the BajoHangout archives.  What a great resource.  I always enjoyed reading his posts.



On topic: "the ebb and flow" of contributors on forums, facebook, etc.



When I started with the banjo 8 years ago, I spent a lot of time searching the archives.  Same thing with the FiddleHangout when I started with the fiddle a year ago.   So much great stuff, archived for future generations of fiddle/banjo players.   The great contributors from the past will always be there for new players in the future.  So, even though they no longer wish or can participate today, their wisdom is there for as long as the Hangouts are active.



I signed up with Facebook to look at banjo related groups a year or so ago.   I much prefer the structure of the Hangout type forums.   Threads on one topic gathered together as opposed to the "scattered" posts of Facebook.   Maybe I was doing it wrong but I didn't care for that format at all.  No more "Facebook" for me.



I've learned quite a bit from the archive searches on the FiddleHangout.   When you are first starting, everything is new and exciting.  To "old hands" who might have an answer to a question from a newbie, I'm sure the same old thing gets kind of boring.  The question has been asked and answered a bunch of time and replying to the same question gets old.  They get to the "let someone else deal with it" stage.



On the Banjo Hangout, there have been quite a few "old timer's" who have dropped out.   Part of this, I think, is the lack of appreciation expressed by the person who asked a question.  We've had very knowledgeable people on the BHO take lots of time to answer questions, sometimes involving a lot of effort, only to be met by no reply.  No "thankyou".  No nothing.  No wonder people get disillusioned and quit responding or quit the Hangout's.  



It doesn't take much to reply with a "thank you" or even a "like" to let someone know you appreciate their effort to help people or, at least, to give some kind of acknowledgment.



There's not as much activity on the Fiddle Hangout as there is on the Banjo Hangout.  So, I'm not so "gun shy" about posting here.   It's not like you're paying  "long distance" charges (remember those?).   If someone responds to one of my "newbie" post, thanks, I appreciate it.   I've very much enjoyed the people I've interacted with on the FiddleHangout. 



I wouldn't be where I am today with my fiddle journey without your help now or the help those who have posted in the past who have no idea how much there time and effort in posting in the past has helped me in the present.



 

PIK - Posted - 09/08/2020:  08:59:28


Doug D mentioned the difference in style, repertoire and approach to playing fiddle in his generation. Might be good to expand on that observation.
I've noticed, for example, that playing dances is practically gone along with dance style.
Access to a multitude of digital music and notation is a wondrous thing indeed but I feel I'm missing the personality, culture and inclusiveness of sitting in on a bunch of "old guys" playing.
OK, maybe I'm just old!

Cyndy - Posted - 09/08/2020:  21:32:07


Looks like I joined October 2008 which would have been about nine months after I started playing. I learned so much from people here in my early years of fiddling. I owe a lot to the countless people who answered my questions and inspired me to keep trying.

Fiddler - Posted - 09/09/2020:  10:10:16


quote:

Originally posted by DougD



Nowadays a lot of members just learned at their local weekly jam session or maybe Clifftop. The music is much different in repertoire, style and approach. Oh well, at least people are enjoying themselves.






I have to agree. When I first started in the mid-70s, access to recordings was expensive, if you could find them at all! I was fortunate in that I was living in Austin, Tx and there was a very active traditional music scene, particularly with the Austin Friends of Traditional Music. I met some great folks who helped me along and nurture my playing. When I was brave enough to play in public, I met some old timers in northern Arkansas who immensely impacted my approach to playing. I can go down the list of who's who of Ozark/Missouri fiddling and I have had the good fortune to meet and play with nearly every one of them. But, for me, it was Lester Bennett and his wife Elnora of Mtn Home, Arkansas who "adopted" me as their grandson. Lester was the most significant impact on me. 



At the AFTM music sessions, there was little distinction between old-time and Celtic music. We just considered Celtic music to the "originial old-time." Thus, the repertoire that we played was a common, solid mix of both. When Celtic bands and old-time bands, including western swing came to town, we all went. AND, went to the after-performance party and jam with the bands!! Chieftans, Boys of the Lough, DeDannan, Ossian, RIders in the Sky, Dave Swarbrick, Kevin Burke, Mike Seeger etc. etc. What a blast and an incredible experience to be in their presence!



Our repertoire was highly influenced by their performances and recordings. Additionally, the seminal recordings of Tommy Jarrell and revivalist old time groups such as Fuzzy Mtn String Band, Highwoods String Band, and the Hollow Rock String Band provided a core repertoire and a starting point for additional exploration into the music that influenced them - Skillet Lickers, Doc Roberts, John Carson, Uncle Dave Macon, Charlie Poole, Burnet and Rutherford and many, many more. 



Thus, whenever we got together for a music party, we all had a wealth of common tunes and recordings. For many of us, if you were to start playing "West Fork Gals", everyone would immediately mentally start going through the tracks on the two Fuzzy Mtn String Band albums. If you didn't know the tune, you would soon be playing it! Same with Highwoods, Hollow Rock and the others! 



When my then-future wife and I started the North Texas Traditional Dance Society in Dallas in the early 80s, my focus shifted a bit to the core tunes used for contra dances. New England Chestnuts 1&2 and the New England Fiddler's Repertoire was a big influence. A contradance band workshop with Glen Morningstar in the early 80s furthered my understanding of the tunes and the importance of phrasing. Glen became a quick expert in the dance and music and led many dances in the area, including historical dances at Lovett Hall in Detroit. (My wife and Glen learned to call dances together when she lived in Detroit.) Other dance workshops with Bob Dalsimer, Tony 



I have seen more recently an almost rabid interest in identifying the earliest known recording and tagging that recording as the "true and correct way to play the tune and all others are to be shunned."  Along with this is an almost equally rabid interest in learning tunes that are nearly unplayable in a jam setting. (I see both of these as OT snobbery!)



Don't get me wrong, I appreciate the folks that can mimic these old recordings and tunes. For me, I am not just attracted to their performances. Occasionally, though, I will come across a revivalist recording that is interesting. I will go back to the historic source recording to see how it informed the present recording. I want to understand how their approach and interpretation made the tune more interesting and compelling. What I can take away from their playing?



The plethora of great resources currently available digitally have made creating a common repertoire difficult at best.  We don't have just a handful of artists to choose from - we have 100s. And, we have gotten into a personality-driven market. Those who don't self-promote find themselves "out." So, it is a vicious rat-race to stay relevant and compete for the scant fan dollars being spent in the traditional music genre.



As Doug mentioned, the times were different and they are vastly different today. I sometimes long for those days.

ChickenMan - Posted - 09/09/2020:  14:05:53


I hear a lot of disparaging words lately about crabby people who learn from source recordings. As one who likes to track down the source recordings and learn from them, I have never said, nor have I heard anyone say anything about shunning anyone's version of a tune and I hope I never do. Seems like those folks don't want play with others. Group playing is ALWAYS a compromise unless everyone is playing from sheet music.



What I like about source recordings is discovering there are more notes or different contours to a tune than the version that gets smoothed by the folk process. Like a game of Telephone where the first person learns it from the source and after so many iterations of passing it on the final version sounds vaguely like the original. And there are most definitely tunes that have a source, many of which are a much better quality tune than what gets sifted down into "festival version."



And of course, there are plenty of source recordings that are hard to listen to and hard to decipher.


Edited by - ChickenMan on 09/09/2020 14:19:25

Fiddler - Posted - 09/10/2020:  09:21:51


I have no problems with learning from source recordings!! My encounters with OT police have been with increasing frequency over the past 10 years or so. I don't find playing in those types of jams enjoyable or edifying. I may be alone in this....

When I hear a current revivalist or current artist whose playing catches my interest, I want to know their influence. Where did they find that tune/song? If I want to bring that tune/song into my repertoire, I want to make it my own and not a duplicate of the recording.

Several of my music friends share my sentiments. We jokingly say that "we don't like prechewed food." We want to taste the "food" ourselves and make our own assessment about it. We want to hear and learn from the source recording, but at the same time making the tune unique to us.

So, to those who collect and post source recordings, thank you! To those who are keeping the music alive and fresh by learning from the source recordings, thank you!

ChickenMan - Posted - 09/12/2020:  06:29:08


Ah, the OT Police. That's a different beast altogether.
I also try to avoid them.

groundhogpeggy - Posted - 09/12/2020:  06:47:04


I've always liked just playing the tunes in my own way, as long as I can figure out what my own way is...lol. But I'm glad for those who work hard to preserve the past...I just couldn't be one of them.

alaskafiddler - Posted - 09/12/2020:  07:59:29


quote:

Originally posted by groundhogpeggy

I've always liked just playing the tunes in my own way, as long as I can figure out what my own way is...lol. But I'm glad for those who work hard to preserve the past...I just couldn't be one of them.






I always find "preserving past" concept (and many similar comments) a bit ironic.



All the older players I ever knew were essentially just playing the tunes in their own way... what they liked, could figure out, made sense to them that sounded good. Don't know of any that was really trying to "preserve" the way someone else played... certainly not for sake of preservation, certainly not someone else's past; academically micro-analyzing a recording of a stranger.



Of course many of those folks would probably earn some disparaging comments, labels or critiques in some of todays circles... something about participating in informal jams or festivals... learned from their similar minded contemporaries, neighbors....  like telephone, sifted down, lacked a definitive named source, or not tracked down to the original recorded source, or some such; obviously fail the test, much inferior for those reasons. laugh



 

groundhogpeggy - Posted - 09/12/2020:  09:02:02


Yeah, true...but I'm guessing that we've lost tons of old time music and fiddling with changes in the previous century that broke communities apart...so when there are those whose analytical minds can grasp whatever fragments there were or are still available in one way or another today, and can grasp and parse it all out for posterity...I'm thinking that's a good thing. I mean, if all of it got lost, and all there was left was commercial music, which in my mind is as good as McDonald's or Twinkies, then we've lost way too much.

tonyelder - Posted - 09/12/2020:  10:34:23


I understand your sentiments, but I don't think folk music is any danger of being lost.  Here's my take on things...



As many tunes as has been lost, there have been a good number created to take their place. And that process continues...



As many communities that have disintegrated (for whatever reason) other communities rise up to take their place.



As long as folks are picking up musical instruments and learning to play tunes / songs - folk music will live on. Even if the source of the material they are learning is the latest popular commercial songs. They will give their best effort and will only be able to do what they can to play it the only way they know how. To me, that is the definition of folk music.



I think we would agree - those old time fiddle tunes we are learning were the popular "hits" of their day.



I don't like it when my romanticized versions of folk music and communities change, but humans are social animals. We will always have those things in one form or another.



Is that "Hangout Lite" enough for everyone?  

groundhogpeggy - Posted - 09/12/2020:  11:44:47


Yes, true, Tony. But of the current or even now probably 50 year old or so folk songs created, I gotta say I just don't care for them like I do the really old stuff...I mean...some of it is ok but most I don't have any desire to play. Most of the old ballads and stuff has been lost...I'm happy for what has been collected and managed to survive the centuries. Same with fiddling and other instrument styles. We don't have to play them exactly as others in the past have, but I just think it's good to know how people played the things they did play. The modern stuff just don't cut it with me...I just don't like hardly any of it that I've heard.

Brian Wood - Posted - 09/12/2020:  13:02:30


I understand Peggy's point, but I do enjoy some newer tunes too. Trouble is I don't always know for sure about some tune's origins, it's hard to find writer credits. I would love to see anyone's list of newish composed old style tunes and who is writing them.



For instance Matt Brown may have composed Shuffling Back and other tunes I like that he plays but haven't heard elsewhere, but I'm not sure. John Hartford wrote a few including The Boys From North Carolina, which people seem to like whenever I play it to them for the first time. Foghorn String Band might have some originals. Farewell Trion is a nice tune that I think might be written. Dull Chisel was written by Gary Harrison.



Of course at some point newer tunes slip far enough into the past that the tradition becomes built around them, too. It's good there's a living ongoing process, and I don't worry the older old tunes are going anywhere.



Clearly though, how people learn tunes in the old time style has changed, and judging by this thread there's been noticeable change in just a dozen years. Way fewer people (including me) have any real connection to the earlier players, and that's a shame but probably can't be helped. I really value folks on this forum that do have a connection. Long may you play.

groundhogpeggy - Posted - 09/12/2020:  14:26:43


Well...I hate to always get back to quoting Dwight Diller...lol...but he used to say it's a common mistake (and this isn't a quote, just the gist of what he says) for musicians to play music that doesn't (here's the quote) "resonate with them." So...maybe some modern music might resonate with a person. I can't seem to connect with probably 99.999 percent of it...but there are a few things here and there I can play and really enjoy playing...then I just worry about if there'd be a copyright problem...my youtube put some kinda copyright watch or something on one I did a while back, "I Wanna Go Home," even though I totally did it my own way...but anyhow...I guess I cut into somebody's copyright by just playing it for fun. There are a few other songs I'd play too...let's see...maybe a couple of Bob Dylan...um...who else? Probably a handful of good ol' country songs that I have no idea who did or wrote or made famous or whatever...don't know who they "belong" to, just that they're fun to play. Other than that...I just don't get into modern stuff.

This was my big problem in the Bluegrass band I was in for two or three years...I didn't care for most of the music we played...besides having to play as fast as I could possibly slop through it...lol. Just didn't relate to most of the music.

Somehow I do relate to really old stuff ... I mean, I did play Maiden's Prayer the other day on youtube...I'm pretty sure that must be a newer thing, although I have no idea. I went through the lesson on Bluegrassdaddy...a site I joined pretty soon after retiring (cost money)...because he has a buncha lessons on all kinds of fancy fiddling...I was a beginner...still consider myself a beginner now...but I plowed through a lot of those really hard things and learned them kinda klunky and then proceeded to forget most of it...lol...which is ok, because again, I learned them to improve my playing, not to imitate the great fiddlers he based the lessons on...yeah, imitate enough to get my playing better, and then forget it and come back to it later my own way. That's what I do. But I do, I guess to use Dwight's term, resonate with the old stuff a lot more.

tonyelder - Posted - 09/12/2020:  15:12:50


Yeap... I do understand. I played bluegrass for a good number of years, and before that contemporary country, and before that early R&R - way back when. And as much as I really enjoyed all of that - while I was playing it - I don't play any of it now.



Its not that I don't like any of that now or won't listen to it... I just prefer to listen to and play old time fiddle tunes. But they ones I listen to and learn are the ones that resonate with me - old, new, fast, slow - just has to grab me or I move on... 



But - I am a social animal, and I love playing music with friends - so, I will play some other stuff on guitar with certain friends - because I enjoy their friendship / fellowship. They resonate with me. The music is good and fun.



 


Edited by - tonyelder on 09/12/2020 15:16:01

Kye - Posted - 09/12/2020:  16:20:36


quote:

Originally posted by fiddlerjoebob

I too have thinned my visitations. I used to check once a day. Lately it’s once a month. I learned so much those first five years. It changed my fiddling for the better in many ways and even changed my direction.



I think now I’m just enjoying the playing and worrying less if I got it right.



I just finished a three week bicycle trip around Vermont with my fiddle. I played tunes everywhere. For anyone, or on the top of a mountain or along the side of a remote lake where there was nobody but me and the loons. I’m going to write about it this winter. I will post a link here. It was wonderful.






Do you have an image of how you bike packed with fiddle in tow?

Kye - Posted - 09/18/2020:  23:44:53


quote:

Originally posted by WyoBob

Breading his posts.



Thank you for posting this :)


groundhogpeggy - Posted - 09/20/2020:  05:43:21


Maybe I'm weird, but I've never liked to listen to music. Possibly because for so much of my life I didn't really have anything to listen on...lol. I heard plenty of it, though. Or maybe just coming from a family who seemed about as anti-music as anybody could be...I don't know. But to this day, whenever I listen, it's usually to see what the person is doing...watch if possible or just listen and try to figure out what they are doing. Maybe admire or be amazed, maybe motivation for me to try this or that, but it's not something I do...if I ever wanted music, ever in my life, it's gotta be that I sit down and play it...lol. I guess that's weird.

When I was in the little BG band for a while I was an Oddball...unfortunately...I mean...they kept referring to bands, which I never heard of...lol...learned a lot of bands and BG people but I forgot most of them by now...they kept giving me CDs they made...finally I told them I still don't have anything to play a CD on...yeah I could put them in the computer, but I don't wanna sit down there in that cold/hot room and listen to stuff...if I sit down there, it's usually to record something myself...yeah I could play them in the car but I don't drive that much and it's not worth the effort. I just never want to listen, wanna play. I also hate electronic tuning gadgets...I've had a tuning fork since I was 10 and that's always worked fine for me. If you tune every string to a gadget, the whole is off within itself, to my ear. Anyway...yes I'm weird. I guess that's why I can't find anybody to jam with anymore. Being weird can feel kinda lonely...but our old friends were all weirder than we are...so...I don't know where all the other weird people went...lol...

But back to the op...I used to belong to a few message boards...just two now, but it seems since covid got going people just aren't doing much on message boards. Seems things have gotten quieter online, in general.

Old Scratch - Posted - 09/20/2020:  09:53:34


"As long as folks are picking up musical instruments and learning to play tunes / songs - folk music will live on. Even if the source of the material they are learning is the latest popular commercial songs. They will give their best effort and will only be able to do what they can to play it the only way they know how. To me, that is the definition of folk music."

Among folkies of a certain age, there is a standing joke: "What is folk music?"

That's the joke. Let's not get into that.

Anyway, the loss of a musical tradition is like, on a smaller scale, the loss of a language. Yes, people keep talking - in the language of their conquerors - and life goes on - but it's a loss, and it's a damn shame, so you can't fault people for lamenting it, or trying to support what's left of the old language, trying to remember how their grandmother expressed something inexpressible in the new language.

No doubt musicians have always jumped on the fashionable and novel - the latest hits. For much of my life, I assumed that all the fiddle tunes I learned from mother had come down from some ancient, mythical past - later on, looking into it, I realized that a number of them would have been the latest hits of her early childhood, so she heard them played all around her as a child - and assumed they had always been there, the way children do with anything familiar. However, the difference between then and now is that there was time and space for the new to be integrated into local culture - an alien fiddle tune could and would be adapted in such a way that it fit into the local repertoire, and might even become prominent in it - but, as I say, given the local treatment. So, for example, the way my mother played Ragtime Annie would have been a long way, literally and figuratively, from the way it would have been played in the Minstrel Shows of the South, or wherever it started its life - but was consistent with the way she played her other tunes, and made sense to her local listeners. Now that whole process of adaptation is skipped (to speak in vast generalities): you hear a recording made on the other side of the world, it moves you, and you listen to it over and over, and try to catch and master every nuance - singers literally learn the accents of people they've never seen, let alone talked to - and your local cultural expression becomes a conglomeration of mimickries .... Ah, well - obviously I've lived too long .... Now, I've got work to do.

fiddlerjoebob - Posted - 09/21/2020:  20:02:08


Yes.  Just can't figure how to  post it here.  I'm not so good at this stuff. 



 


 


 quote:

Originally posted by Kye

quote:

Originally posted by fiddlerjoebob

I too have thinned my visitations. I used to check once a day. Lately it’s once a month. I learned so much those first five years. It changed my fiddling for the better in many ways and even changed my direction.



I think now I’m just enjoying the playing and worrying less if I got it right.



I just finished a three week bicycle trip around Vermont with my fiddle. I played tunes everywhere. For anyone, or on the top of a mountain or along the side of a remote lake where there was nobody but me and the loons. I’m going to write about it this winter. I will post a link here. It was wonderful.






Do you have an image of how you bike packed with fiddle in tow?






 

Kye - Posted - 10/11/2020:  18:03:02


quote:

Originally posted by groundhogpeggy



But back to the op...I used to belong to a few message boards...just two now, but it seems since covid got going people just aren't doing much on message boards. Seems things have gotten quieter online, in general.






I hear ya about frustration with how to listen to music!! I also mostly rely on my computer, or a small cd play that doesn't have great volume. I have a friend with massive towering powerful speakers, I can't even imagine what life would be like with his set up. A friend of mine talks lovingly of times just spend sprawled out on a floor, listening to music. I love the idea of it so much. 



All that being said, I started listening to music using bluetooth headphones. My newest love in life are the Aftershokz Aeropex bone conducting headphones. They are super light weight, last 8 hours. I have them paired to my phone and also the computer. Just a though if that interests you. You can roam wherever using something like that. 



 

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