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 ARCHIVED TOPIC: best tip you've gotten from FH?


Please note this is an archived topic, so it is locked and unable to be replied to. You may, however, start a new topic and refer to this topic with a link: http://www.fiddlehangout.com/archive/51872

bluesmode - Posted - 10/06/2019:  19:07:38


Hello y'all...as I mentioned over in busking stories, I've been off line for a year, but as of yesterday I got on unlimited WiFi from the guy up on the main floor at no charge.

My best tip came from Henry. it was about shifting up high from a lower position (leaps of faith). He said hear the note in your head right before you make the jump. This really worked for me. I'm doing more busking tunes with these kind of jumps and nailing the note 90% of the time.

It's also helped with my 'regular' up and down shifts. Instead of looking where I want to be, I'm concentrating more on 'hearing' where I want to be.

Thanks Henry!

ChickenMan - Posted - 10/06/2019:  19:19:52


That is great advice and basically how I "made the leap."

I was encouraged to explore bowling other than Nashville shuffle. Thank you FiddlePogo and OTJunky (rest in peace, gentlemen).

buckhenry - Posted - 10/06/2019:  19:26:16


Hey, welcome back Dave, have been wondering where you were. So you been working on 'hearing' the shifts only for a year now and you use them in your busking repertoire. Wow, took me much longer than that to feel confident in using them. Pleased to hear you got some thing from the advice I've given, keep at it, and it only gets better.

bluesmode - Posted - 10/06/2019:  20:49:41


well...my regular up and down shifting is rather limited. I remember you doing a post on the different types of shifts, which as far as I can remember included using different fingers, and included terms like compound shifts, complex shifts, compound complex shifts etc. Anyways, I remember there were quite a few, and you had them all named and categorized. If you can remember where that post is, I'd like to take another look at it.

Cheers

oh, btw, is Fujers still with us? I haven't noticed any recent posts, but I've only taken a quick look around in the past coupla days.

buckhenry - Posted - 10/06/2019:  22:23:07


Here's one thread I mention the shifting types, I am sure we discussed it many times on hangout.

fiddlehangout.com/archive/29314


Sadly, Jerry Holmes passed away around December. R. I. P.

bluesmode - Posted - 10/07/2019:  08:32:35


very sorry to hear about Jerry, but I suspected as much. I'll miss the geezer.

imapicker2 - Posted - 10/07/2019:  10:51:51


"You might as well use barbed wire as Black Diamond (Fiddle) strings." Try Helicore or Prim."

My enthusiasm took off , after the switch. Thank You!

TuneWeaver - Posted - 10/07/2019:  14:09:24


quote:

Originally posted by ChickenMan

That is great advice and basically how I "made the leap."



I was encouraged to explore bowling other than Nashville shuffle. Thank you FiddlePogo and OTJunky (rest in peace, gentlemen).






SO.. What is your bowling score these days?



 

TuneWeaver - Posted - 10/07/2019:  14:11:05


Best tip from the FH? Don't be afraid to play for your friends..

ChickenMan - Posted - 10/07/2019:  15:05:03


quote:

Originally posted by TuneWeaver

quote:

Originally posted by ChickenMan

That is great advice and basically how I "made the leap."



I was encouraged to explore bowling other than Nashville shuffle. Thank you FiddlePogo and OTJunky (rest in peace, gentlemen).






SO.. What is your bowling score these days?



 






My score is terrible. My niece, who is a sophomore in high school, her scores are amazing. She's already practically a pro bowler. Seriously. 



My bowing is better than ever. 



 

Dick Hauser - Posted - 10/07/2019:  17:12:23


The best tip I received was learning about the availability of Gordon Stobbe's "12 Things Your Right Hand Should Know". It taught me more about bowing than all the violin and fiddle instructors I studied with.

stumpkicker - Posted - 10/07/2019:  18:03:58


Raise your action and listen to Earl!







Whoops sorry, wrong website! :-)

groundhogpeggy - Posted - 10/07/2019:  18:05:38


I think just about everything I know I probably learned from following conversations on FHO or asking dumb questions. Pogo was one of the most helpful, among many other generous and knowledgeable people. After reading on here I always had a lot to think about and a lot to mess around with...I miss lots of those guys that used to be here.

DougD - Posted - 10/07/2019:  19:02:10


I agree that I miss a lot of the people that used to be on here. Whether they were wise or just opinionated it was interesting.

Snafu - Posted - 10/08/2019:  05:24:01


1. A post on FH lead me to the wonderful book called “Hokum: Theory and scales for fiddle Improvisation” by Leon Grizzard which has helped me in countless ways.

2. The advice to play/learn it at slow tempo until it is in the fingers before speeding up.

3. Play often with others - preferable people who play better than you do.

bluesmode - Posted - 10/08/2019:  05:42:21


quote:

Originally posted by imapicker2

"You might as well use barbed wire as Black Diamond (Fiddle) strings." Try Helicore or Prim."



My enthusiasm took off , after the switch. Thank You!






As most of you know, I don't fiddle, and I use 'violin' strings. I do however like the Helicore A which I use on my Louis Lowendall made in Berlin 1893. On that fiddle I've got Pirastro Perpetual G, Larson Tzigane D, Helicore A, Pirastro Pepetual E.

tonyelder - Posted - 10/16/2019:  18:26:44


BJ was an active member when I first started visiting this place. Sadly, like many others - she has passed (RIP).



But she challenged everyone in a post to make a point. The challenge was to see for yourself just how little pressure it really takes to note a string with the tip of your finger.



I took her up on the challenge, and she was right.  Now - I hardly ever press a string all the way to the finger board. I want to say it has made a difference for me. 

Jimbeaux - Posted - 10/17/2019:  00:31:34


The best tip I got was to stop bowing from my shoulder. I posted a beginner's progress video and fujers (RIP) said something like "it looks like this guy's elbow is fused. We gotta get that thing moving!"



He even tried to recruit me as a skype student, haha. I'm sure I could have learned good stuff from him, but he didn't play anything close to the style I want to play so I respectfully declined, but I did realize that I needed to work a lot on my bow arm and get a teacher. We need someone like fujers on this site again. An opinionated, but good fiddler with absolutely no filter. It's great for getting conversations going even if sometimes, well, you know.



In general, I've always gotten excellent advice when posting a video and asking for feedback from experienced players. Just being able to do that and get responses from great players was priceless. I'd recommend it to anybody. You get much better feedback here than anywhere else like facebook fiddle groups or youtube.


Edited by - Jimbeaux on 10/17/2019 00:34:42

Fiddler - Posted - 10/17/2019:  05:23:53


For me the most important pointer was not about the mechanics of playing, but about music theory. I have learned so much from FHO members.



I am a bit embarrassed because in the 11 years of piano lesson I had growing up, I never learning much music theory. Geesh - if I had paid attention back then, no telling where I would be now.

finn mcc - Posted - 10/17/2019:  08:04:19


diagnosis of what was wrong with my bow, part to buy, where to get it -- I was able to get it fixed right myself, quick.

boxbow - Posted - 10/18/2019:  04:47:44


Don't use cleaners. Use spit and a clean rag to clean the finish on your fiddle.

groundhogpeggy - Posted - 10/20/2019:  11:42:52


Dog spit ain't so bad either.

farmerjones - Posted - 10/21/2019:  20:00:05


My memory of the late Fiddlepogo, was his eloquent comment, "learning to play fiddle is like learning to pet a cat." So true, on so many levels. R.I.P. M.S.

Dragonslayer - Posted - 10/23/2019:  09:06:38


quote:

Originally posted by farmerjones


 "learning to play fiddle is like learning to pet a cat."



No, learning to play fiddle is worth the effort! 

groundhogpeggy - Posted - 10/23/2019:  11:11:54


Pogo would have liked it and laughed, Gunnar.

ChickenMan - Posted - 10/29/2019:  04:18:57


Too much spam these days...

Humbled by this instrument - Posted - 10/01/2020:  16:33:01


"Put clothespins on your bridge to control yar volume."

Wait, was someone telling me to be quiet? Hmmmmmph.

DougD - Posted - 10/01/2020:  16:59:31


Not really a tip, but the best thing I've learned at the FHO was from groundhogpeggy - that the pileated woodpecker was sometimes called a woodcock. That's the kind of information you can really latch on to.

farmerjones - Posted - 10/01/2020:  18:31:32


Always check the origination date of the thread, and consider it before you reply.

Sometimes it's okay. Sometimes it's not.

TuneWeaver - Posted - 10/01/2020:  18:51:50


The best tip I've received was that I should study music theory.. I bought Music Theory for Dummies.. and learned a lot.

Kye - Posted - 10/10/2020:  15:20:57


Sorry Im so on and off aroubd here. Life is just so distracting, but i always come back! The archives are incredibly valuable! I can't think of a specific technique, but being able to search through the archives for bowing patterns and conversations on them, is something I'm very greatful for.

Skookum - Posted - 10/11/2020:  16:17:11


Forcing myself to know where each note played lies on the scale of the tune's key - doing so widely opened the doors to music theory, learning by ear, and improvisation.

donRamon - Posted - 10/31/2020:  20:30:55


Best thing I learned was to use shorter bow strokes for playing faster

cunparis - Posted - 11/18/2020:  12:00:10


quote:Originally posted by Snafu1. A post on FH lead me to the wonderful book called “Hokum: Theory and scales for fiddle Improvisation” by Leon Grizzard which has helped me in countless ways.


Can you tell me more about the Hokum book? It sounds interesting. I looked at some sample pages at amazon but it's not enough to understand how the book works. What are the exercises?

Thanks

cunparis - Posted - 11/18/2020:  12:03:07


quote:

Originally posted by Dick Hauser

The best tip I received was learning about the availability of Gordon Stobbe's "12 Things Your Right Hand Should Know". It taught me more about bowing than all the violin and fiddle instructors I studied with.






It's been years since I watched this DVD and I think I could benefit from watching it again.  Thanks for mentioning it.   It was great the first time but I was a beginner.  



 



 

Snafu - Posted - 11/19/2020:  06:21:03


Cunparis, the best way to describe the Hokum book is it teaches the structure of fiddle tunes as it relates to music theory. When you play fiddle tunes, you are really just “practicing” music theory even if you don’t realize it.

A few thoughts - You need to be able to sightread and play fiddle off of standard notation and some experience playing a chord based instrument like a guitar will be handy. The goal is to gain the ability to improvise fiddle on the fly once you ascertain the key and rhythm. I’m still working on that!

Another way of putting it is most fiddle tunes and simple folk songs are really just arpeggios (played as single notes) of chords. There are lots of practice exercises divided up by key in the first part of the book. The second half of the book gets into really meaty subjects like dominant chords/scales, modes, minor keys, modes, pentatonic scales and a nice foray into blues. It is amazing what is packed into its 120 pages. Send me a pm and I can take a few pictures or scan a chapter into a pdf and send it to you to examine.

cunparis - Posted - 11/19/2020:  07:26:11


Thanks for the details. I found it at a good price on Abe's books (English books can be hard to find in France or they are very expensive) so I went ahead and bought it. It'll take a few weeks to arrive. I'm looking forward to it. I can read notation and I play a bit of ukulele so it sounds like a good match for me.

cunparis - Posted - 12/03/2020:  13:34:00


I received the hokum book and have been working on it. I was expecting more guidance on the exercises. I'm in the G major chapter where he says to play over some G-D chord progressions. So I created one in Band in a Box and I have it loop and I play over it. But what I'm playing isn't too interesting. So I don't know how far to go with it.

DougD - Posted - 12/03/2020:  14:55:38


Another good non-fiddle tidbit from Groundhog Peggy - that there is a Jenny Lind cantaloupe! I'd never heard of it, but it looks interesting and I think I'll try growing them next year.

Lonesome Fiddler - Posted - 12/03/2020:  15:22:33


I might have said this before, but despite the fact I don't play much Old Time anymore (the fiddling world is simply too vast for me to focus on one genre) I just like hangin' here. Watching the vids. Listening to the mp3's. Enjoying reading posts from a bunch of good people.

RB-1 - Posted - 12/04/2020:  05:34:54


I'm still waiting for THE tip that will help me forward. surprise



For some strange reason, unknown to me, fiddle tabs don't follow the normal tab system. like found for example in mandolintabs. frown



So no sightreading for me as I'd hoped for...sad

Snafu - Posted - 12/04/2020:  06:16:50


Bruno, not to be a smart arse, but THE tip is to learn to read standard notation and leave tab behind. Give it a good couple of weeks of focused effort and you will get it down fairly easy. All the fiddle tune books are in standard notation. I’m assuming since tab was your first option that you will be playing in first position only since I have never seen tab used for tunes “down the neck”.

A distant second is to learn to play from ABC notation.

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