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 ARCHIVED TOPIC: Is fiddling hard?


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Old Scratch - Posted - 12/19/2018:  14:18:56


Yeah, I was thinking as I wrote my previous post that one reason some people push back against the idea of talent is that they feel it diminishes all the hard work they've put into their art. Also, they're sometimes afraid that younger people with talent will think that their talent is enough.

There's another aspect to it, as well. I think a person with great talent sometimes feel more deserving of their success if they feel that they can claim that anyone could have achieved the same if they had only worked as hard, been as responsible, etc.

pete_fiddle - Posted - 12/20/2018:  01:22:34


i think perceived talent or lack of it, maybe down to the way that folks synapses link the different parts of a persons brain, and then how they, or their parents, teachers, peers, and environmental factors...etc,  develop those links,.... a nature/nurture thing that is easier for some than others, owing to them being "wired for sound" or some other thing, to differing degrees ...even as early as birth maybe??



i think those synaptic links, as well as a persons physique are developed through a persons lifetime, and can show up as a "Talent" for one thing or another...music being just one of those things...Plumber, logger, Electrician, Cook...etc, etc, being others.



i remember an interview with Yehudi Menuhin where he was amazed that people could actually do other things as well as playing fiddle, like ..."Bee keeping ??".......don't know what he would have thought of one of his students using using a chainsaw or a kitchen knife?? ....BTW i think  he was a "Talented Teacher",  as well as a great violinist.

 

Beardog - Posted - 12/20/2018:  05:33:03


It is hard to sound like someone else playing a tune. It isn’t hard to sound like myself playing the same tune.

bsed - Posted - 12/20/2018:  15:13:34


quote:

Originally posted by FiddleHed

Hey @abinigia and @DougD, I just want to clarify some things:



I am indeed a fiddle teacher.



I ask "Is fiddle hard?" and more importantly "What is actually hard?" as a way to both teach as well as learn (for myself).



Can you pinpoint exactly what is hard? A certain tune may be hard, but what is actually hard?



Is it one particular section? Then ask, "What's hard about that?" How closely can you pay attention to what you are doing? Can you break something down to the point at which it is no longer difficult?



The other reason I ask is that I'm constantly trying to learn how to be a better a teacher. I've been doing it awhile (22 years) but am still making big discoveries. I'm also still not getting through to certain students and want to know why.



Anyway, thanks everyone for your thoughts.




I'm not gonna tell ya anything you don't already know. If you've got beginner students, the big obstacle is this bow thing.



Then when you have more advanced students, maybe they want to sound just like Vassar or Kenny Baker. That's hard to pull off. You might ask, "Is it more important to sound JUST LIKE somebody else, or to us said role models to get to a point where they can produce a fantastic sound?"



I could elucidate further, but I've caused enough damage to this thread.







 

pete_fiddle - Posted - 12/21/2018:  10:59:15


quote:

Originally posted by Beardog

It is hard to sound like someone else playing a tune. It isn’t hard to sound like myself playing the same tune.






When i am playing fiddle, i am not myself,... i am an amalgamation of my musical influences, experiences, suppositions, mental and physical limitations, and advantages, and i am ....."in the moment" ....a fiddler,.... whether someone else thinks i am or not...



And the only thing that matters is the tune....the world can go hang....but come back again when i've done...please



Edit:....pretty pleaseindecision


Edited by - pete_fiddle on 12/21/2018 11:02:43

Jimbeaux - Posted - 12/21/2018:  14:40:50


I'll bite.

It's not harder than other instruments in my beginner's opinion.

It's just so loud and in your and everyone's faces that mistakes can't be overlooked.

And if you always practice with mutes you won't have a great sound when the mute comes off.

Bad fiddlers would be just as bad on other instruments but it might not be as noticeable. And they wouldn't have to lead, which is another hurdle on the fiddle.

Old Scratch - Posted - 12/21/2018:  17:37:30


"Bad fiddlers would be just as bad on other instruments"

I don't know if that's true. I've known a few musicians who were accomplished on other instruments but just couldn't get anywhere with fiddle, try as they might.

Slide - Posted - 12/21/2018:  23:16:17


quote:

Originally posted by Old Scratch

"Bad fiddlers would be just as bad on other instruments"



I don't know if that's true. I've known a few musicians who were accomplished on other instruments but just couldn't get anywhere with fiddle, try as they might.






Agreed

alaskafiddler - Posted - 12/22/2018:  00:25:26


It seems the folks who complain the most about hard of the intonation, lack of frets, difficulties with the bow and holding instrument; are those that come from already play another instrument such as guitar or banjo... 



FWIW, I've known good fiddlers that couldn't get anywhere on the banjo, guitar, various accordions, uillean pipes... piano. 



Maybe due to expectations, patience (forgetting how long took); or just that it is so different than what initially learned; or just trying to compare something? or maybe some instruments just make more sense for a person.



I don't know if any is really that much intrinsically harder than another, just different. Learning to make sound with a bow vs pick on day one, sure... but after a few weeks or months it levels off - the "hard" comes more down to other issues, some universal, like timing, rhythm, phrasing, understanding the music.



The violin is not "impossible" - world and logic shows lots of folks (even kids) that are not making torturous noise squeals, intonation, not sounding like anything for months or years... but achieve satisfactory reasonable tone and intonation results fairly quickly... No they are not going to sound like a concert violinist, (yes by that standard it's hard)  but what instrument has any quick master success?


Edited by - alaskafiddler on 12/22/2018 00:42:22

finn mcc - Posted - 12/22/2018:  12:54:15


yep it's hard but if you're compulsive you just can't quit so your family suffers. Bowing is hard for a picker to learn, intonation another new skill. I have a friend who is a better guitar player who just couldn't play enough without good intonation to learn intonation. Hurt his own ears. Wonderful sense of pitch and -- Couldn't stand not being perfect and just quit on fiddle. I came to fiddle from playing guitar most of my life, Whistle later and mando was the entry drug. After fifteen years (50 to 65), Just bought a new to me fiddle , (made by Mike Conroy, Hamilton MT), woo hoo, for some strange reason things are starting to flow. I love it. Could be the fiddle or maybe just needed to keep sawing, or maybe old age and hearing damage.

By the way I have benefitted from fiddlehed's website and others . Thanks to all of you who post your fiddling.

Al

Joel Glassman - Posted - 12/22/2018:  19:52:34


What's hard?

Tone, timing, articulation, pitch, being healthy, having stamina, avoiding performance anxiety, blending well with others musically, expressing the essence of your music, learning phrasing in the genre you're playing, finding like-minded players you can relate to, blending practice time into your life, having patience with yourself, having courage to hear and change what sounds wrong. Having courage to deal with decline when it inevitably occurs.

What are the big questions?

They are "how much do you want this?" and "what are you willing [and able] to do to make it happen?"


Edited by - Joel Glassman on 12/22/2018 19:53:44

Jimbeaux - Posted - 12/23/2018:  01:32:36


quote:

Originally posted by Old Scratch

"Bad fiddlers would be just as bad on other instruments"



I don't know if that's true. I've known a few musicians who were accomplished on other instruments but just couldn't get anywhere with fiddle, try as they might.






Okay, I take it back. You're right. 

alaskafiddler - Posted - 12/23/2018:  20:14:33


quote:

Originally posted by FiddleHed

Do you think it's hard to play the fiddle?



What's actually hard?



Are you able to simplify what you do enough so that it sounds good?



Do you ever just play a single note and make that sound amazing? Can you carry forth that good sound to a few notes or a small phrase? 



Can you find a way to enjoy the simple sound of the bow on the strings?






Do you think it's hard to play the fiddle?



No, not to play. (I wouldn't play if was hard).  Most things seem hard if you haven't learned how; seem much easier if you learned how.



What's actually hard?



I suppose like most anything, those things or aspects I want to do but haven't learned how.



Is it hard to "learn"  to play the fiddle? It is impossible surprise. Different question than play, but starts with impossible  to universally define what that means, so no determined end point of success qualifying "play the fiddle". Individuals use own metrics and criteria qualifies and important. 



Are you able to simplify what you do enough so that it sounds good?



These other questions relates to a process of learning, (and how hard?) Simplify and breaking the generic large goal to smaller individual aspects. When broken down to individual aspects, things become IMO easier to evaluate and address... But (as far as hard) still each in the end is individual determination; mostly comparative of effort and time vs goal and reward... but with no universal metrics; each individual has to evaluate from their own metrics of difficulty (as well as what qualifies as sounds good).  



------------



Just some thoughts on this...



I was told long ago...  Never instill into students (including yourself) something will be hard. The pre-assumption of whether something should be hard serves no beneficial purpose; often just gets in the way of learning. 



Similarly assuming "talent" has anything to do with the process doesn't serve any benefit to actual learning.



Comparing difficulty of fiddle to any other instrument; doesn't serve any benefit to actually learning aspects of how to actually play fiddle. (the goal?)



[edit: I am reminded that should also be cautious about the message "it's easy" (for yourself and others). It can be beneficial as cheerleading; but It can lead to frustration, low self-confidence, defeated attitude; if one thinks something is supposed to be very easy for others and you can't get it.]



Better to not think about whether something is hard or not; compared to this or that; talent or not;...don't think about those at all, as no benefit to learning.... and rather just focus on what specifically want to learn, learning how, break it down to individual components, identifying what you need to do; problem solve, work on solutions. Keep at it, experiment, analyze, find solutions.



In the end there will be things you learned how to do; and things you still haven't figured out, learned how to do. 


Edited by - alaskafiddler on 12/23/2018 20:26:31

Lonesome Fiddler - Posted - 12/24/2018:  01:17:44


I have found intonation to be a bear to nail down. Yes, it's not especially difficult to properly intonate the lower octave of a first position D scale because the right hand's physiology (or at least my right hand's physiology) naturally allows the fingers to fall into their proper places. Once I get onto the next octave on the E string, though, my middle finger just can't fall squarely onto the half step without strain or wrist gymnastics. To make matters worse, the subsequent whole step that takes you from the G to the A is equally if not even more difficult to nail.

The C scale is still worse, as that darn middle finger half-step happens on a string that makes it even more difficult to get it right on. I'm definitely not alone on this, either. Every time somebody orders the jammers to start playing tunes in C, you hear groans. You also hear the quality of ensemble intonation go even more sour than the usual 'casual' Old Time intonation. In other words, the human hand is just not made to hit the pitches the ear so desires. The instrument is the devil's box.

Now, dear readers, let's turn to the task of properly hitting the seventh note of the D scale on the G string... Why it's enough to make a fiddler want to tune the G string up to A!

Old Scratch - Posted - 12/24/2018:  08:17:05


Here's the solution: start your D scale on the open D, go up an octave to the D on the A string and come back down. Presto! Problem solved.

pete_fiddle - Posted - 12/24/2018:  12:57:46


 i think one of the hardest things for me to learn on fiddle was, (and still is mostly), to learn to be subtle, and have the confidence to know that folk who want to listen can hear my attempted subtleties (and are quite forgiving mostly),...folk that aren't listening can't hear me.... they're not listening,.... and i cant make them listen by playing harder, or playing faster, etc etc, (the recipe for tension and frustration)



The fiddle is a loud enough, and distinctive enough instrument, and leaves quite a bit of room for Dynamics and subtleties...(sometimes less is more)



i think the trick may be to get folk to want to listen, and not to play hard all the time.....i'll get it one day.....maybe one for a new year resolution?...

Lonesome Fiddler - Posted - 12/24/2018:  13:18:40


quote:

Originally posted by Old Scratch

Here's the solution: start your D scale on the open D, go up an octave to the D on the A string and come back down. Presto! Problem solved.






Ah, but there are plenty of instances where you want a delicious roll-up from the bottom string to that open D.  Doodily Dum!  A, B, C#, D!

Old Scratch - Posted - 12/24/2018:  13:37:55


By gum, I never thought of that ... !

pete_fiddle - Posted - 12/24/2018:  13:39:09


Use B C C# D! .....instead (fingers 234-open D) Bluesely Dum!

Dick Hauser - Posted - 12/25/2018:  07:32:27


I think the fiddle is an "unforgiving" instrument. Small changes in playing technique have a disproportionate effect on sound quality. For me, the hardest thing is relaxing and allowing my fingers/wrist/forearm to naturally react to pressures when bowing. Slowly practicing scales and allowing this to happen helped a lot. I had a professional violinist/fiddler record 2 octave scales. Playing along with the scales improved my bowing and intonation. I am actually "long bowing" when I practice scales. This exercise also improves note recognition. I have done this for years and even after relatively long layoffs, my playing ability recovers quickly when I start playing again.

I also try to use as little pressure as necessary when noting. So I guess the answer is not trying to "muscle" or force things when playing. Very little muscle power is required when playing fiddle.

Apltrez - Posted - 12/25/2018:  16:15:52


Thanks all for the interesting perspectives. Just the thing for a late, Christmas afternoon after doing the traditional march to a matinee movie to watch The Mule( well worth the watch, although much of it filmed near me).

after pondering the notion of "how hard is it?", my .02 is it is totally relative. After I could play guitar reasonably well in my late teens,well enough to be paid to play in a band, the idea of the upright bass was hard....hard on my fingers and no frets.....really hard. Then years after when I leaned mandolin....how in the hell is a man with large hands and fingers toughed by farm work supposed to fit ham-hands onto a mandolin neck?

When I started fiddle about 8 or so years ago I thought that was tough as it could get....no frets, syncopated bowing, body gyrations to hold it that initially caused a literal pain in the neck.........
BUT... it was this this sound I always heard in my head and I persevered long enough to sit in on most OT jams, play dances and have a good time for me and myself only.

The only better thing was when I made the break with getting paid, anything(other than free beer), to play at a session or a dance.

Fast forward to October.. I decided to take on the Cajun accordion.........again cause I had always heard it in my head and to hear it made me smile.

With the Cajun accordion you play totally different things with right hand ( 10 button of treble)
and 2 buttons of base and an air release......... with the left hand. Oh, and it is diatonic so different notes and tones when you push the bellows versus pulling the bellows. And the rhythms with each hand are different. Also you eventually need more than one accordion because they are tuned to one key with limited ability to creatively play in a couple of other keys. Did I mention you have to learn to sing in French while you play(albeit chords), then go back to playing the melody.

Now that is REALLY hard but good news is it is just for now an just for awhile

Like I said my .02....It is all relative.

TuneWeaver - Posted - 12/25/2018:  16:54:54


Playing a fiddle can be relatively EASY if you are already a musician, understand timing, can read music, already have the tunes in your head and , and, and..



Playing a fiddle can be relatively HARD if you are not already a musician, don't understand timing, can't read music and don't have the tunes in your head, and, and, and

So, yes, it is all relative.


Edited by - TuneWeaver on 12/25/2018 17:01:58

Apltrez - Posted - 12/25/2018:  17:06:42


Yes, even better stated Lee

FiddleHed - Posted - 12/26/2018:  14:50:39


This question began for me in a meditation retreat. At certain times I thought, "This **** is hard!" Then I started to wonder, "Is it hard because I say it's hard? What if I just don't say it's hard?"



quote:





Originally posted by gapbob



Fiddling is hard if you make it hard. It is fun if you make it fun, seeing where you are going, and learn to enjoy the path to reaching that place.





 



And so I decided that instead of saying "This is hard," I would ask "What is hard?"



Then I had to ask, "Is life hard or does it feel hard?" And then to bring it on home "Is fiddling hard?"



Where are the pain points? What can I do to practice them?



Maybe I'll stop thinking and talking about this for the moment and play some music  laugh

FiddleHed - Posted - 12/26/2018:  15:00:20


quote:

Originally posted by boxbow

quote:

Originally posted by Old Scratch

No question in my mind that talent is a 'thing'. I've seen people with considerable natural musical talent who were not motivated to develop it, and people like me with not much but who keep plugging away at it, year after year ......






Perhaps this is my own bias.  When I hear people discuss "talent" it seems it's usually not musicians using the word and they seem to imply  prodigy rather than deliberate effort.  The folks I play with readily acknowledge that a person can play well, that he or she contributes to the group.  Having put in some effort myself makes me view the whole thing more technically.






I tend to think that talent is overvalued and practice is undervalued.



From an early age, Mozart and Kobe Bryant spent countless hours a day, learning and practicing their craft.  But it's easy for people to say, "They're lucky because they're so talented."



But, I don't know. Maybe they are lucky. Maybe you're lucky if you simply find a way to do it.

TuneWeaver - Posted - 12/26/2018:  16:06:45


quote:

Originally posted by FiddleHed

quote:

Originally posted by boxbow

quote:

Originally posted by Old Scratch

No question in my mind that talent is a 'thing'. I've seen people with considerable natural musical talent who were not motivated to develop it, and people like me with not much but who keep plugging away at it, year after year ......






Perhaps this is my own bias.  When I hear people discuss "talent" it seems it's usually not musicians using the word and they seem to imply  prodigy rather than deliberate effort.  The folks I play with readily acknowledge that a person can play well, that he or she contributes to the group.  Having put in some effort myself makes me view the whole thing more technically.






I tend to think that talent is overvalued and practice is undervalued.



From an early age, Mozart and Kobe Bryant spent countless hours a day, learning and practicing their craft.  But it's easy for people to say, "They're lucky because they're so talented."



But, I don't know. Maybe they are lucky. Maybe you're lucky if you simply find a way to do it.






I cringe when people say,  "you are so talented'... I quickly let them know that I have NO talent.. only persistence.. I WORKED HARD FOR EVERY NOTE.. I have Little talent....!!!!  Some other people may have talent, but not me.. 

Old Scratch - Posted - 12/26/2018:  16:13:08


Wait a minute - do you have "Little" talent or "NO" talent? There is a difference, and it is significant.

I am sure, btw, that there are other people who have put in as much work as Mozart and Kobe Bryant without getting quite the same results. Wasn't that unfairness one of the themes of "Amadeus"?

TuneWeaver - Posted - 12/26/2018:  16:17:58


OK Old Scratch... Yes there is a difference between little and No talent... I'll stick with NO..

Even now after 40 years of playing I often realize that I'm not actually LISTENING to the sounds that I make on my fiddle....and am just throwing my fingers out there onto the fingerboard...If I had a LITTLE talent, I might listen more closely to what sounds I was making.. NO talent, means just letting hand/brain stuff do the work..smiley

fiddlerjoebob - Posted - 12/26/2018:  16:46:46


Life is hard.

Fiddling?

Not so much.

TuneWeaver - Posted - 12/26/2018:  17:14:50


quote:

Originally posted by fiddlerjoebob

Life is hard.



Fiddling?



Not so much.






That is EXACTLY why I try to not take myself too seriously here on the Hangout.. It is not life or death.. but fun, and I like to keep fun in its place...

fiddlerjoebob - Posted - 12/27/2018:  04:53:20


quote:

Originally posted by TuneWeaver

quote:

Originally posted by fiddlerjoebob

Life is hard.



Fiddling?



Not so much.






That is EXACTLY why I try to not take myself too seriously here on the Hangout.. It is not life or death.. but fun, and I like to keep fun in its place...






Happy new "spin around sun" Mr. Weaver.  

Old Scratch - Posted - 12/27/2018:  08:51:03


Life IS fiddling! .......... isn't it?

pete_fiddle - Posted - 12/27/2018:  12:02:31


Nahh.....life is life ...fiddling is fiddling,.... just gets blurred sometimes

Lonesome Fiddler - Posted - 12/27/2018:  20:26:48


I was raised in a family that had genuine artistic talent. Dad and Mom painted well. They supported us in artistic endeavors, and over the years my older sister has made a pretty good living out of her her painting and sculpture. She worked for a record company for a while and has many album covers to her credit. She's had gallery showings galore and probably brings home more cash than her lawyer husband.

Me? Zero artistic ability despite a genuine love for art. Miserable handwriting, as well.

FiddleHed - Posted - 01/06/2019:  17:05:30


Does anyone object if I condense this discussion into a post on my Fiddlosophy blog? Is that kosher? I’ll ask for permission if I quote anyone’s comments. Thanks...

neptune - Posted - 01/10/2019:  11:59:31


One thing that can make fiddling hard is to see it as a competition. It is easy to be put off when you see payers who are so much better than yourself. Not everything in life has to be a competition. Remember that over 95% of people cannot play a scale or even a note on a fiddle, let alone a tune. So if you can play twinkle twinkle little star, you are already in the top 5%. Take pride in where you are at today. You are most likely a little better than yesterday. OK, you owe it to yourself to be the best you can be. Only one person can be the best in the world. Do not let the perfect be the enemy of the good. Above all, enjoy your playing, and hopefully bring a little pleasure to others.

neptune - Posted - 01/10/2019:  12:00:18


Forgot to mention, many thanks Fiddlehed for the help you have given me.

Skookum - Posted - 01/11/2019:  15:01:19


It is hard, but that's part of what makes the journey worth while. I've watched friends who were virtuosos years ago and now don't play much and don't seem to enjoy it all that much when they do, whereas I struggled for thirty years but never lost my love or desire to get better - so I think I'm better off than those with natural born talent. It's the goin' not the getting' there.

old cowboy - Posted - 09/27/2019:  13:05:09


quote:

Originally posted by DougD

Before you guys get too farfetched, you might want to check out FiddleHed's bio: fiddlehangout.com/my/FiddleHed

He's a teacher, and I think is trying to promote his teaching methods in some obscure way.






Fiddlehed is the most generous man you will ever meet! Yes he is a teacher. But before you say too much about him check out all the hundreds, yes hundreds of free videos he offers on youtube!  I am retired and live on a limited income and this man has been a God send to me!

Beardog - Posted - 09/27/2019:  13:58:44


Yes. Fiddling is fun, but it is also hard, if you want to become the best that you can be. Compared to stringed instruments with frets, that are played with picks, it is more difficult to learn, but more rewarding. Good pickers are a dime dozen. Good fiddlers are not.

Dragonslayer - Posted - 09/27/2019:  13:59:32


Is fiddling hard? To some, yes. I didn't find it to be so.

Is fiddling hard? No, living with a fiddler is hard.

Is fiddling hard? Not as hard as fiddling.... while doing the splits (ask how I know....)

bitman - Posted - 09/27/2019:  21:10:30


I'm 57. After playing electric lead guitar since age 12 I recently decided I wanted to finally learn to play the violin er... fiddle. (roll eyes)

I've never known a fiddle tune in my head but have a bunch of hymns in there from my recent stint in the praise team at church. So a learned that way. Wondering how I could get up to speed, literally without being familiar with the standard fiddle tunes (that sound like an unfamiliar random bunch of forgettable notes when broken down on youtube for me), I decided what I would try was to crank the metronome up to oh, 200 bpm and play ode to joy and others as fast as possible in hopes that after mastering that speed blue moon and other bluegrass tunes would come easier.

For example, I tried to learn Ida red (never heard of it) the teacher took it real slow and I thought I had it until I googled the song. - oh, that one. Gosh that's too fast for me and this bow.

Yeah it's hard. Slow bow is my biggest issue.

kurth83 - Posted - 09/27/2019:  23:22:11


For me violin is an experiment, after having played many other instruments (only one of them well). I am told violin is hard, so I may not ever amount to anything. But I'm going to give it a few years to find out.

DonArch - Posted - 09/28/2019:  19:39:51


Three years into the fiddle, the one thing that has made me a better player, besides all the scale s I’ve practiced, double stops, etc. The one thing that has made me a better player is when I stoped strangling the notes out of the fiddle, with time comes a comfort level, with that comes a smoother bow and lighter touch. Just my opinion and experience.

FiddleHed - Posted - 10/08/2019:  18:48:37


Hey @kurth83,

If you focus on getting a good bow sound, the rest will follow. Especially if you;ve played other string instruments.

old cowboy - Posted - 03/27/2021:  16:27:33


I think I can and. this better now than when you first asked it. Is fiddling hard? No more than any other instrument It all depends on what you want from the instrument and how much you are willing to give in order to get that from it! My little brother and I both started out 64 yrs ago to learn the flattop guitar. And we did indeed learn it. I learned to play second enough to play along with my favorite records of flat and Scruggs. And I enjoy it.

Little bro. can play flat top like Doc Watson and electric like Glen Campbell. What made the difference? To this day if you go to his house, I guarantee you will find him sitting with guitar in hand practicing. So the question is not how hard is it, but how much are you willing to invest in time and energy to master it!

old cowboy - Posted - 03/27/2021:  16:29:43


quote:

Originally posted by old cowboy

 Is fiddling hard? No more than any other instrument It all depends on what you want from the instrument and how much you are willing to give in order to get that from it! My little brother and I both started out 64 yrs ago to learn the flattop guitar. And we did indeed learn it. I learned to play second enough to play along with my favorite records of flat and Scruggs. And I enjoy it.



Little bro. can play flat top like Doc Watson and electric like Glen Campbell. What made the difference? To this day if you go to his house, I guarantee you will find him sitting with guitar in hand practicing. So the question is not how hard is it, but how much are you willing to invest in time and energy to master it!






 

The Violin Beautiful - Posted - 03/27/2021:  17:27:58


If you can play already, it’s not that hard. Those who are just taking up the instrument will often say that fiddling is hard, but I think the difficulty is in playing the instrument in general, not so much in playing the particular style.  Most tunes can be learned in a matter of minutes and the chord structure is very simple.



The genre is accessible to a much wider group of players because the tunes are so much simpler and easier for a wider group of players to pick up. That’s part of the appeal of playing in jams or dances—players can learn the tunes on the spot and join in without needing a high level of technical skill.



Fiddling is a sort of folk music, and folk music is a style that’s characteristically spare. It’s sort of a Zen thing—its beauty is in its unpolished simplicity and rawness.


Edited by - The Violin Beautiful on 03/27/2021 17:29:32

jacroom - Posted - 03/28/2021:  04:45:27


I think it's dang hard. I play every day and have now for years. I'm a journey guy so every day is a pleasure. I don't think there are any shortcuts. You just gotta keep playing and sooner or later, the dogs will stay in the house while you're playing instead of heading out the doggie door.

FiddleHed - Posted - 03/28/2021:  09:32:55


@jacroom I really like what you said, "I play every day and have now for years. I'm a journey guy so every day is a pleasure."


Edited by - FiddleHed on 03/28/2021 09:33:35

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