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 ARCHIVED TOPIC: Improving Standard Notation


Please note this is an archived topic, so it is locked and unable to be replied to. You may, however, start a new topic and refer to this topic with a link: http://www.fiddlehangout.com/archive/46814

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soppinthegravy - Posted - 06/24/2017:  14:53:39


Are there any ways you think the standard system of musical notation could be improved, assuming changes would be accepted?

mmuussiiccaall - Posted - 06/24/2017:  18:19:15


I could see the use of a different colored note for a pitch on a different string than normal on a stringed instrument in place of numbers in circles, descriptions of which string it is on etc.

fujers - Posted - 06/28/2017:  15:03:36


I don't think so. Why change something thats been in use for hundreds of years. There are ways to improve your reading skills tho. Hey I don't read either and have done well without it. Now adays I wish I could read and it's to late to teach and ole dog new tricks. Jerry 

Brian Wood - Posted - 06/28/2017:  16:56:26


It's too late. They don't call it "standard" for nothing. The best one can do for fiddle tunes is to have the page look clean and uncluttered so slow readers like me can follow it.

larry dominique - Posted - 06/28/2017:  22:23:46


In my opinion, standard musical notation is a living language and as such it should include "new words or phrases" to the language just like spoken languages change with time. What new "words" or "phrases" do you want to add to standard musical notation? I say, if you're writing standard notation, use your "changes" and explain your changes. If readers like it, they'll find it usesful and will use it. Of course there will be the orthodox who will refuse any change. But there will be those who'll dare to grow with their music. Good luck.

Brian Wood - Posted - 06/29/2017:  09:32:58


Well, what kind of changes would we be talking about? What needs improvement?

BanjoBrad - Posted - 06/29/2017:  11:16:34


Having learned standard notation in the 3rd grade when I took piano lessons, I'm pretty much locked into it after using it for the past 66 years to teach myself classical guitar, banjo, tin whistle, and fiddle.



Although I will admit to using tab for banjo more since I have consistent trouble with moving the 5th fret G note in notation to the open G note on the 5th string when reading notation.

soppinthegravy - Posted - 06/29/2017:  14:21:32


I just wanted to start a disscussion on what people would change about it if they could change it, even though they probably can't. Lol. Does that make sense?
I think their needs to be a better way to illustrate which notes are just drones and which ones are melody notes.

quote:
Originally posted by abinigia

Well, what kind of changes would we be talking about? What needs improvement?





Edited by - soppinthegravy on 06/29/2017 14:22:18

Brian Wood - Posted - 06/29/2017:  15:23:18


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quote


:


Originally posted by soppinthegravy



I think their needs to be a better way to illustrate which notes are just drones and which ones are melody notes.


quote: 









I can see the use of that. More than one note slows me down. Also, when I have given my transcriptions to someone else to use who isn't a fiddle player they often don't want to see double stops. I have gotten around that sometimes by making double stops a lighter grey, and leaving the melody black. I use Musescore for transcribing.


Edited by - Brian Wood on 06/29/2017 15:24:24

soppinthegravy - Posted - 06/29/2017:  16:29:11


I like that idea.

quote:
Originally posted by abinigia

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quote


:


Originally posted by soppinthegravy



I think their needs to be a better way to illustrate which notes are just drones and which ones are melody notes.


quote: 









I can see the use of that. More than one note slows me down. Also, when I have given my transcriptions to someone else to use who isn't a fiddle player they often don't want to see double stops. I have gotten around that sometimes by making double stops a lighter grey, and leaving the melody black. I use Musescore for transcribing.




gapbob - Posted - 06/30/2017:  06:42:24


No significant changes—the issue is that speed of reading and clarity of information are essential.  It would be interesting to figure out how to better notate notes far off the staff with many ledger lines, also, would like a better 8va indication that wouldn't require training a priori to be able to do it.

Lonesome Fiddler - Posted - 06/30/2017:  11:19:55


Standard notation delivers everything you need to get a piece into your fingers.  To be sure, it'll always leave details out.   But standard notation can still get you fairly close to what the originator of the piece intends (or if the originator didn't do the notation, the best guess of the transcriber).  A proper transcription will also give tips on how to best express what is believed to be the originator's emotional intent.   Maybe it'll indicate Con fuoco.  Play it with fire!  Alla marcia funebre.  Like a funeral march.   There's no reason bowing can't be included, either.



Then, of course, there's another question.  How punctilious do you want your playing of the tune to be?  Do you want your rendition to be nothing more than a photocopy?  Or do you want to give it something new?  Something of yourself?  A new take.  A fresh improvisation.

Snafu - Posted - 06/30/2017:  15:25:29


I'm curious if anyone here likes the way standard notation is modified in the Milliner-Koken Collection of American-Fiddle Tunes tome? The biggest difference is that bar lines are completely eliminated. Supposedly they are not needed if the notes are given the required time duration. I have the book but have not really taken to it. Wondering what others think about it.

Brian Wood - Posted - 06/30/2017:  16:12:19


quote:

Originally posted by Snafu

 

I'm curious if anyone here likes the way standard notation is modified in the Milliner-Koken Collection of American-Fiddle Tunes tome? The biggest difference is that bar lines are completely eliminated. Supposedly they are not needed if the notes are given the required time duration. I have the book but have not really taken to it. Wondering what others think about it.







I haven't seen it but it sounds terrible. Bar lines tell you where you are. Bar lines are perhaps the single most useful feature of standard music notation. Sheet music without bar lines? The very idea offends me. I bet that collection didn't sell many copies.


Edited by - Brian Wood on 06/30/2017 16:12:59

BanjoBrad - Posted - 06/30/2017:  18:20:00


I think you would lose that bet, Brian.  The book is an invaluable resource for American Fiddle tunes.  The lack of bars exists mainly so that "crooked" tunes can be annotated without a lot of gyrations with the staff lines.  To be honest, the lack of bar lines never really registered on me.  With the audio of each resource available on-line, with down-load capabilities, the timing isn't that hard to figure out.



I, like many others, were waiting in line for the book to be issued with our money already sent.


Edited by - BanjoBrad on 06/30/2017 18:21:36

Brian Wood - Posted - 06/30/2017:  19:25:11


quote:

Originally posted by BanjoBrad

 

I think you would lose that bet, Brian.  The book is an invaluable resource for American Fiddle tunes.  The lack of bars exists mainly so that "crooked" tunes can be annotated without a lot of gyrations with the staff lines.  To be honest, the lack of bar lines never really registered on me.  With the audio of each resource available on-line, with down-load capabilities, the timing isn't that hard to figure out.




I, like many others, were waiting in line for the book to be issued with our money already sent.


Okay, I guess I lose. Why do you like no bar lines? I really rely on them, and they don't clutter up the page in a bad way. What possible advantage is there? What happens when you want to work on just a section? Do you pencil in your own markers ever?






 

Snafu - Posted - 06/30/2017:  20:12:43


The M-K book of fiddle tunes also does not provide a time signature for any of the tunes. It does give the key and the "standard" fiddle tuning that the tune was originally played in. If you google it there are examples of some of the tunes presented. Within the context of this topic I wonder if this is simplification (improvement according to the books authors) by subtraction of typical standard notation information. I personally like bar lines and time signatures and have a hard time reading notation lacking them. I hope the M-K interpretation does not catch on...

fujers - Posted - 06/30/2017:  22:17:07


Now this is what a crooked song sounds like. You know how you play Merry Had A Little Lamb and you almost finish the verse and you just cut into chorus a little bit early or sometimes way to early. Thats crooked as it gets. There's nothing wrong with it but you ain't going to be able to find anyone to play with you unless they play as crooked as you do haha.



And it also goes with a lot of singers, drummers, piano player..heck just about any instrument on the planet. Why? I don't now..just warn me when one is about to hit the stage



I played once in a band and we hosted a talent nite on Sundays. There was this older man that got up and had this beautiful voice. He sang crooked. We all know the tune Merry Had A little Lamb don't we. He sang it like this..Merry Had A little Lamb..Little Lamb and his flees was made of snow. Excluding the rest of the words and went on th the rest and none of the band could keep up with him.



It's not just a fiddle thing it happens in all music..some people just can not keeps time. Jerry



bing.com/videos/search?q=crook...FORM=VIRE



 

boxbow - Posted - 07/01/2017:  07:03:43


Standard notation meets my limited needs quite adequately.  As it is, I keep a reference handy when I'm annotating a tune for myself because I can't keep straight some of the simplest things, like which way the clef faces and that sort of silliness.  I've followed this thread with great interest, though.  If there are improvements to be made, I'm afraid they wouldn't see much use around my scribblings.

gapbob - Posted - 07/01/2017:  09:14:03


There is no real reasoning as to why there are no barlines.  I think the answer was "I didn't want to do that much work—I know!  I'll let the readers do the work!  Hahaha!"  Here is my review:



this book could have been monumental but as it stands it is a disappointment in that it is only good because of the decision that was made by its authors to not include rhythmic markings, measure lines and time signatures, in the transcriptions there is a discussion in the book on page v of the introduction about how once written music did not have these markings eventually ending with this statement despite much criticism from our contemporaries we have decided that oldtime music is best written with no barlines a few questions were rhetorically asked before that statement demonstrating the difficulties of notating old-time music none of these questions were insurmountable but they do take effort making that effort would have transformed this book to greatness making it more accessible to the reader over the centuries improvements to musical notation were made to make it easier to read transcriptions and produce music it is not easy but it is not impossible to use musical notation to make written transcripts of old-time music or any other folk music for that matter one must remember that written transcriptions are only an estimation of how the sound of the music should be recreated and that this recreation always takes on a styling from the musician playing the music



I purchase a book because someone else took the time to do the work and to publish it. In this case, the work is partially done. There are a number of other books I will refer to before I use this one.  

Brian Wood - Posted - 07/01/2017:  09:55:56


quote:

Originally posted by gapbob

 

There is no real reasoning as to why there are no barlines.  I think the answer was "I didn't want to do that much work—I know!  I'll let the readers do the work!  Hahaha!"  Here is my review:




this book could have been monumental but as it stands it is a disappointment in that it is only good because of the decision that was made by its authors to not include rhythmic markings, measure lines and time signatures, in the transcriptions there is a discussion in the book on page v of the introduction about how once written music did not have these markings eventually ending with this statement despite much criticism from our contemporaries we have decided that oldtime music is best written with no barlines a few questions were rhetorically asked before that statement demonstrating the difficulties of notating old-time music none of these questions were insurmountable but they do take effort making that effort would have transformed this book to greatness making it more accessible to the reader over the centuries improvements to musical notation were made to make it easier to read transcriptions and produce music it is not easy but it is not impossible to use musical notation to make written transcripts of old-time music or any other folk music for that matter one must remember that written transcriptions are only an estimation of how the sound of the music should be recreated and that this recreation always takes on a styling from the musician playing the music



I purchase a book because someone else took the time to do the work and to publish it. In this case, the work is partially done. There are a number of other books I will refer to before I use this one.  







a very interesting  review indeed it makes a good point of what I was trying to say about the importance of bar lines in fact without bar lines rhythmic context is easily lost thanks shave and a haircut two bits.

DougD - Posted - 07/01/2017:  10:20:30


I wonder how many readers actually even notice the omission of barlines in the Milliner - Koken Collection. Its never bothered me, although in some other contexts its handy to be able to refer to "bar 43" or something.



As far as sales, I think the book has sold quite well, and rather than careless or incomplete was a carefully thought out labor of love in every respect. Its already a modern classic I suspect.


DougD - Posted - 07/01/2017:  10:23:42


PS - I would think it if you just want to work on a section, the notes and outline of the tune would be enough of a guide to where you are.


Brian Wood - Posted - 07/01/2017:  10:34:22


I had to see it for myself, and found this page. I see no advantage to leaving out bar lines.



mudthumper.com/fiddletunesbook.html

Brian Wood - Posted - 07/01/2017:  11:28:28


I also think the standard system of showing key signatures is good.

DougD - Posted - 07/01/2017:  14:05:32


Snafu - The time signature at the beginning of a piece describes the configuration of a measure - how many beats it contains and what note value gets one beat, expressed as a fraction. So if there are no measures, it follows that there will be no time signature either.


Brian Wood - Posted - 07/01/2017:  14:52:06


quote:

Originally posted by DougD

 

Snafu - The time signature at the beginning of a piece describes the configuration of a measure - how many beats it contains and what note value gets one beat, expressed as a fraction. So if there are no measures, it follows that there will be no time signature either.


 




Or, the time signature could be like 4/64. I wasn't aware of this book before this thread. Though it seems odd to me to leave out bar lines, it seems like for some that's an improvement to standard notation. In that vein I expect there might be some players who prefer having no key signature with accidentals shown as needed. Personally I wouldn't care for it, but some might.

BanjoBrad - Posted - 07/01/2017:  15:22:10


quote:

Originally posted by abinigia

 
quote:


(Originally posted by BanjoBrad

...)


Okay, I guess I lose. Why do you like no bar lines? I really rely on them, and they don't clutter up the page in a bad way. What possible advantage is there? What happens when you want to work on just a section? Do you pencil in your own markers ever?








 







I would never dare to mark up any book that I own that isn't a cross-word or test-yourself book!  Never have been able to get that blasé about books.



That said, I didn't mean to infer that I like or prefer no bar markers; having been a classical guitar player for over 60 years, I usually need them.  But in the case of the Milner/Koken book, the lack of them never dawned on me.  Maybe I just put them there in my mind, or maybe it's because I am not good enough on the fiddle to need them.  I was interested in the melody of the tune, and never really concentrated on anything but the flow of notes.  It's hard to explain, kind of like when I had a coding problem back in my working days, I might wake up in the middle of the night with the answer demanding I get up and correct it.


Edited by - BanjoBrad on 07/01/2017 15:24:30

Brian Wood - Posted - 07/01/2017:  16:02:50


quote:

Originally posted by BanjoBrad

 
quote:


Originally posted by abinigia

 


quote:


(Originally posted by BanjoBrad

...)


Okay, I guess I lose. Why do you like no bar lines? I really rely on them, and they don't clutter up the page in a bad way. What possible advantage is there? What happens when you want to work on just a section? Do you pencil in your own markers ever?








 








I would never dare to mark up any book that I own that isn't a cross-word or test-yourself book!  Never have been able to get that blasé about books.




That said, I didn't mean to infer that I like or prefer no bar markers; having been a classical guitar player for over 60 years, I usually need them.  But in the case of the Milner/Koken book, the lack of them never dawned on me.  Maybe I just put them there in my mind, or maybe it's because I am not good enough on the fiddle to need them.  I was interested in the melody of the tune, and never really concentrated on anything but the flow of notes.  It's hard to explain, kind of like when I had a coding problem back in my working days, I might wake up in the middle of the night with the answer demanding I get up and correct it.







Yes, it is a common thing I think to not want to mark up books. I kind of got over it over the years. I've realized my music books are my tools and nobody else cares, so I'll notate in pencil sometimes. Hey, is your avatar a resister or a diode?

DougD - Posted - 07/01/2017:  16:19:49


I'm betting its a resistor, about 1.2 MOhms, and 10% tolerance (or is silver 20%?). I once looked for a connection to his name, but couldn't find one.


fujers - Posted - 07/01/2017:  21:13:47


I don't really know much..as all ways. I really think that if you were to put this in standard notation you would just be playing what the song song sounds like. You can do that you know. If someone plays ahead of the beat or plays behind the beat I think it may be wrtting..me I like tunes tunes that are on the beat...much much easier to play. As far as the time signature it just changes to 3/4 it doesn't cut in half time..it just changes time. Cut time is going from 4/4 to 2/4 or 6/8 to 3/4. Cutting time is when you take a beat and cut in half..thus 4/4 to 2/4. Jerry.  

BanjoBrad - Posted - 07/02/2017:  11:36:11


It's a resistor, like me (but don't tell the moderators).



 10%, Doug.  Only connection would be its function and the fact that I spent 21 years with a Telecommunications company, although at that time it was referred to as a Telephone company. Worked as an Installer/Repairman, Testboardman, Switchman, T-Carrier technician, Electronic Switch Maintainer, Electronic Switch Engineer/Software Engineer, and ended up as a Staff Techsupport Engineer for Electronic Switches.  Bailed when Judge Green decided to destroy the most efficient communications system in world just because it consisted mainly of 2 giants.



Enough, before I get in trouble again.

soppinthegravy - Posted - 07/03/2017:  11:55:38


Guys, just draw bar lines in the book lightly with a pencil. They were trying to avoid people complaining about changing time signatures. Look at the discussion I started on transcribing crooked tunes for an example of how the decision of when to change time signatures can be a subject that makes people argue. Why can't we propose new ideas instead of bashing other people's ideas? Here's something more unusual than the M-K approach. Has anybody heard of Hummingbird notation?


Edited by - soppinthegravy on 07/03/2017 12:00:57

Lonesome Fiddler - Posted - 07/03/2017:  13:23:47


The bar lines and time signatures do a large part in making sense of the overall melody line.  They tell you how the notes in the measure are to be phrased and expressed.  I might have said this before in the fiddle hangout but it drives me nuts when players do nothing more than spin off a series of notes with no sense of where the melody lives within those notes.  In jams, sometimes I actually have to ask the person who started the tune, "Where's the one?"  "Where's the downbeat?"

mmuussiiccaall - Posted - 07/04/2017:  07:30:03


quote:

Originally posted by fujers

 

I don't really know much..as all ways. I really think that if you were to put this in standard notation you would just be playing what the song song sounds like. You can do that you know. If someone plays ahead of the beat or plays behind the beat I think it may be wrtting..me I like tunes tunes that are on the beat...much much easier to play. As far as the time signature it just changes to 3/4 it doesn't cut in half time..it just changes time. Cut time is going from 4/4 to 2/4 or 6/8 to 3/4. Cutting time is when you take a beat and cut in half..thus 4/4 to 2/4. Jerry.  







Jerry you need to cut the top and bottom numbers.

gapbob - Posted - 07/04/2017:  12:25:06


quote:

Originally posted by soppinthegravy

 

Guys, just draw bar lines in the book lightly with a pencil. 







Yeah, that's the ticket!  I spend $85 on a book so I can spend another thousand hours drawing lines in it!



Better yet, I could get the source recordings and do my OWN transcriptions!  That would be good.  I could even do away with the note duration indications, because you know all those notes are crooked and not exactly quarter notes, eighth notes, etc.  Folks just don't understand how good my transcriptions would be.  I could even get rid of those pesky bar lines, I'd be able to transcribe some tunes lickety-split!  Here is a preview of my transcription of Eck Robertson's Sally Goodin:



..............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................







I understand how large the task was to even get it to the point it is at, but it would be better if they had done it in Volumes with more effort per each, Volume I, II, III, as the job was done.  


Edited by - gapbob on 07/04/2017 12:29:32

soppinthegravy - Posted - 07/05/2017:  15:17:43


Apparently, there is an entire site dedicated to this topic. musicnotation.org


Edited by - soppinthegravy on 07/05/2017 15:18:42

Brian Wood - Posted - 07/05/2017:  21:51:52




the idea of a chromatic staff is interesting. But it’s like trying to change the qwerty keyboard, it’s too late.

DougD - Posted - 07/07/2017:  13:15:59


Good résumé, Brad. I've recently realized that 50 years ago I spent the year as a member of the Long Lines detachment, 1st Signal Brigade in Saigon at MACV-1 (General Westmoreland's headquarters). I was trained as a fixed station (shortwave) transmitter repairman, thinking that would be unlikely to be in a rice paddy, and then retrained in carrier equipment repair. While I was there the US installed a new long lines telephone system (replacing I think Korean vintage tube tactical equipment and the guys that knew it) and there was really nothing to repair, so I became a tech controller (I think a toll test board man in civilian terms) and ended up as the senior tech controller at our site, which was an interesting place to work. I spent the last year of my military career teaching carrier theory and repair at the Signal School at Ft. Monmouth. I never pursued any of this later, but it gave me a little different perspective on sound system engineering (along with the fact that my Dad was a respected broadcasting engineer who worked for CBS for many years).



So I still remember my resistor color codes!


Joel Glassman - Posted - 07/23/2017:  17:55:18


Originally posted by soppinthegravy
I think their needs to be a better way to illustrate which notes are just drones and which ones are melody notes.
--------------------------------------------------
I would tie the drone notes together with a curved line, above or below the melody. Also face the stems of the drone notes in a different direction from melody notes.

TuneWeaver - Posted - 07/25/2017:  13:46:50


I have often taken fiddle transcriptions or instruction books and put my own take on Slurs onto the notes.. Many instruction books just seem to be written by people who have never played a fiddle...

Loup - Posted - 09/29/2017:  15:01:42


quote:

Originally posted by dnique

In my opinion, standard musical notation is a living language and as such it should include "new words or phrases" to the language just like spoken languages change with time. What new "words" or "phrases" do you want to add to standard musical notation? I say, if you're writing standard notation, use your "changes" and explain your changes. If readers like it, they'll find it usesful and will use it. Of course there will be the orthodox who will refuse any change. But there will be those who'll dare to grow with their music. Good luck.






 

Loup - Posted - 09/29/2017:  15:04:00


Isn't this what Jazz does to standard tunes? Or am I off the mark ?

pete_fiddle - Posted - 09/30/2017:  09:13:36


quote:

Originally posted by TuneWeaver

I have often taken fiddle transcriptions or instruction books and put my own take on Slurs onto the notes.. Many instruction books just seem to be written by people who have never played a fiddle...






Replace "Often" with " Always" in your post and that's about my take on written music ...i reckon it's a guide, and i would only pay it a lot of attention if it was written down by the composer and signed by them.....with  at least 2 witnesseswink

Grassapelli - Posted - 10/20/2017:  07:23:49


@abinigia 



I had to see it for myself, and found this page. I see no advantage to leaving out bar lines.



http://www.mudthumper.com/fiddletunesbook.html



Thanks for publishing the link. It's great to see what fiddlers are talking about. I notice by beat four the bow is allowed to go backwards from the previous saw groove. Oops! There goes that groove again.



My biggest gripe with fiddle tune collections is the crappy bowings.

Brian Wood - Posted - 10/20/2017:  08:46:20


quote:

Originally posted by Grassapelli

My biggest gripe with fiddle tune collections is the crappy bowings.






Certainly no advantage in leaving out bar lines. As for crappy bowings, I don't understand why you expect sheet music to show you how to bow. The mechanics of playing are the responsibility of the player. What I look for, and try to write, is clear, uncluttered melody and note values. Too much other stuff on the page is a distraction.

pete_fiddle - Posted - 10/26/2017:  13:02:43


i think it would be nice if tune books had less tunes,(maybe even a single tune or set of tunes) and more info about how and why the arranger has interpreted a tune in a certain way, with logical (musical) explanations of why they shift here, or bow that way there, and maybe some anecdotes and different ways of getting around the tune, some guide as to how they are thinking of the rhythms in different sections of a tune, links to their sources etc..etc, to inspire folk to find their own way around the tune in a musical way.. with guidance, i mean a fiddler could write a whole book(let) on each and every tune they know... if they know them well (enough). i've got thousands of tunes in books lying around the place that wont get played (or maybe i'll hunt them out one day), because they are just dots on a staff that someone put there, maybe wrong, maybe right , who knows?



an alternative to  cramming thousands of  "iffy" tunes into uninterpretable tomes maybe?



after all a good tune is for life not just for Christmas... or Paddy's day,....or....whatever's day ....(apologies for mentioning the "C" word so early)

bsed - Posted - 12/29/2017:  11:59:32


quote:

Originally posted by gapbob

There is no real reasoning as to why there are no barlines.  I think the answer was "I didn't want to do that much work—I know!  I'll let the readers do the work!  Hahaha!"  






I disagree with that, because there is music software "out there" that will render a song/tune in standard musical notation. (Disclaimer: I have never used such software. I have only heard about it second hand.)

Dick Hauser - Posted - 12/30/2017:  07:09:43


We have to remind ourselves that musical notation is used by a wide variety of users. Different instruments, different skill levels, etc.. I consider myself an intermediate level amateur. A professional classical violinist showed me the notation he is provided with for classical performances. For me, the complexity was staggering. His notation makes the notation I use look very simple. I am guessing that most amateur fiddlers don't realize how complex musical notation can sometime be. Even the excellent Suzuki instructionals are more sophisticated than most tunes in fiddle repertoire books. The only positive change I could think of would using colors for a change like crescendo.

Lynne - Posted - 07/13/2018:  12:58:44


I think we’d first need to ask ourselves, “what has changed appreciably in the past 300+ years since Standard Notation was developed?” Perhaps an answer lies in the advent of technology? In recognizing, for example, that not all music played today is rendered via acoustic instruments. Today, we have the electronics of music, a possibily vast universe. Another consideration might be the impact of various standards then and now in existence.

Originally posted by abinigia

fiddlehangout.com/global/ckedi.../icon.png) center no-repeat #ff0000;cursor:pointer;top:-8px;-moz-border-radius:2px;border-radius:2px" title="Insert paragraph here">↵



quote


:


Originally posted by soppinthegravy



I think their needs to be a better way to illustrate which notes are just drones and which ones are melody notes.


quote: 









I can see the use of that. More than one note slows me down. Also, when I have given my transcriptions to someone else to use who isn't a fiddle player they often don't want to see double stops. I have gotten around that sometimes by making double stops a lighter grey, and leaving the melody black. I use Musescore for transcribing.






 

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