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 ARCHIVED TOPIC: Quick... what chord is this?


Please note this is an archived topic, so it is locked and unable to be replied to. You may, however, start a new topic and refer to this topic with a link: http://www.fiddlehangout.com/archive/46008

TuneWeaver - Posted - 03/10/2017:  03:57:51


Key of c... If I play a B on the G string and the open D, what chord is that?



Also, what chord is it if I play the B on the A string and the open E???


Edited by - TuneWeaver on 03/10/2017 03:58:58

Tobus - Posted - 03/10/2017:  04:30:04


A stopped B on the G string and an open D would be part of a G chord (V chord in the key of C), depending on the context.  Technically it would be a 1st inversion of the G chord, since the B is the third of that chord, played with the fifth.



A stopped B on the A string with an open E could be part of an Em chord (iii chord in the key of C), but this would be much more dependent on the context.


Edited by - Tobus on 03/10/2017 04:31:18

TuneWeaver - Posted - 03/10/2017:  04:31:22


quote:

Originally posted by Tobus

 

A stopped B on the G string and an open D would be part of a G chord (V chord in the key of C), depending on the context.




A stopped B on the A string with an open E could be part of an Em chord (iii chord in the key of C), but this would be much more dependent on the context.







Thanks, Tobus.. that helps.



 

ChickenMan - Posted - 03/10/2017:  05:12:29


B on G plus open D could also be a Bm being the root and third of that chord. As a G it is the third and 5th Note. So many options and we haven't got into 7th chords and their relatives 9ths, 11th.  . . 



 

MikeyBoy - Posted - 03/10/2017:  06:54:38


 


 


quote:


Originally posted by ChickenMan

 

B on G plus open D could also be a Bm being the root and third of that chord. As a G it is the third and 5th Note. So many options and we haven't got into 7th chords and their relatives 9ths, 11th.  . . 




 


 




Yup. You need a minimum of three notes before you can call it a chord. In the key of C, a B and an E could be Em, Cmaj7, G6, Am9.... 



Depends on context of course, what chord came before, what came after, style of music, what other instruments are playing, etc.  If you're playing OT or another harmonically simple style, go with the most obvious answer - in the key of C, Em is the only 1-3-5 triad that contains both a B and an E. 

Tobus - Posted - 03/10/2017:  08:35:19


quote:

Originally posted by ChickenMan

 

B on G plus open D could also be a Bm being the root and third of that chord. As a G it is the third and 5th Note. So many options and we haven't got into 7th chords and their relatives 9ths, 11th.  . . 




 







I did consider that, but Bm would be an odd chord for the key of C.

bluesmode - Posted - 03/10/2017:  18:42:09


quote:

Originally posted by Lee M

Also, what chord is it if I play the B on the A string and the open E???







a good blues fill that I find myself using more....same finger position as the above...using the E as a drone..with the classic blues, or even rock 'n roll riff of B, Db, D, Db, B, done in almost all the various ways it can be done on a guitar.



the B & E notes would be for an E chord. go down to the D & A strings with the the E & A notes for the 4 Chord

Lonesome Fiddler - Posted - 03/10/2017:  23:28:09


quote:

Originally posted by bluesmode

 
quote:


Originally posted by Lee M

Also, what chord is it if I play the B on the A string and the open E???








a good blues fill that I find myself using more....same finger position as the above...using the E as a drone..with the classic blues, or even rock 'n roll riff of B, Db, D, Db, B, done in almost all the various ways it can be done on a guitar.




the B & E notes would be for an E chord. go down to the D & A strings with the the E & A notes for the 4 Chord







I've been doing that stuff, too.  Amazingly effective and easy.

Joel Glassman - Posted - 03/19/2017:  16:58:48


Here's a list of scale tones in keys. Fiddle music usually uses the keys of FCGDAE,

so that's all I'll refer to. Check this link out:

howmusicworks.org/208/The-Majo...All-Keys.



To use those notes [B on the A string and the open E] as a chord or interval,

look at the diagram. Common chord tones are the 1,3,5,b7. 6 and 2 [aka 9] are color tones. Including the 1 [aka "root"] is not necessary if others are playing it. In the key of G, B is the 3, E is the 6. The 6 is a sweet sounding note--something you might hear in western swing. So, "B,E" is a G6 without the root. Also, B and E are the 5 and 1 in the key of E. This "B E" interval is more or less dissonant elsewhere in the keys of FCDA.


Edited by - Joel Glassman on 03/19/2017 17:02:55

Joel Glassman - Posted - 03/19/2017:  17:26:20


Here is the real link

howmusicworks.org/208/The-Majo...-All-Keys



My explanation is limited, but look at the key of A. The "5" chord in an A progression could use the "E,B" serving as an E chord. I recommend learning this language of spelling chords and progressions. Its a part of "musicianship", and being able to communicate with other players.

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