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 ARCHIVED TOPIC: Notating Variations


Please note this is an archived topic, so it is locked and unable to be replied to. You may, however, start a new topic and refer to this topic with a link: http://www.fiddlehangout.com/archive/44514

soppinthegravy - Posted - 06/17/2016:  19:14:11


What is the best way to notate variations? Please include examples/samples, if possible.


Edited by - soppinthegravy on 06/17/2016 21:13:18

abinigia - Posted - 06/17/2016:  20:47:32


I prefer them as an addendum to the basic transcription,  maybe with an asterisk to connect them.

soppinthegravy - Posted - 06/17/2016:  21:12:13


Can you show me


 


an example?


:


Originally posted by abinigia

 

I prefer them as an addendum to the basic transcription,  maybe with an asterisk to connect them.







 

Cyndy - Posted - 06/17/2016:  21:55:12


That's a really good question--one that I've asked myself many times.



Sometimes I jot them above the basic melody and sometimes, if there are a number of options, I'll footnote the measure, and summarize them on a line of their own below the basic transcription.



I've been working on a banjo tune that I really want to carefully pick apart and I've been thinking that it might be good to use one line for each time through. in other words, if there were 8 measures and the tune was played 6 times through, I'd put the 8 measures of the first time through on the top line and then note variations from the second time through on the second line, etc. I've never done it, but I think it would be a good visual representation of what was happening.



The thing is, though, I only jot things down for myself as a way of remembering when I'm figuring things out and once they're in my head, I rarely go back to the transcription and never share them. I'm thinking your goals are different?

soppinthegravy - Posted - 06/17/2016:  22:09:52


Yeah. I'm trying to write a book. quote:

Originally posted by Cyndy

 

That's a really good question--one that I've asked myself many times.




Sometimes I jot them above the basic melody and sometimes, if there are a number of options, I'll footnote the measure, and summarize them on a line of their own below the basic transcription.



I've been working on a banjo tune that I really want to carefully pick apart and I've been thinking that it might be good to use one line for each time through. in other words, if there were 8 measures and the tune was played 6 times through, I'd put the 8 measures of the first time through on the top line and then note variations from the second time through on the second line, etc. I've never done it, but I think it would be a good visual representation of what was happening.



The thing is, though, I only jot things down for myself as a way of remembering when I'm figuring things out and once they're in my head, I rarely go back to the transcription and never share them. I'm thinking your goals are different?







 

abinigia - Posted - 06/18/2016:  09:12:54


quote:

Originally posted by soppinthegravy

 
Can you show me



 



an example?

 




 Nah, I can't find any examples right now. But I would just write the alternative bars after the main tune with a bar number at the start, and write something above like *bar 12 alt. or whatever describes it. The problem for me in trying to show variations in the main body of the tune is the it clutters it up and makes it hard to read (for me).




abinigia - Posted - 06/18/2016:  10:29:45


quote:

Originally posted by soppinthegravy

 

What is the best way to notate variations? Please include examples/samples, if possible.









I don't know if this is what you're after. This is a variation of a whole part. But your question inspired me to write the variation out which was good practice.



 



briankwood.net/Laughing%20Girl...20var.jpg

TuneWeaver - Posted - 06/19/2016:  13:09:48


Some music books just put a separate line of music which indicated, for example, "Part two variation"...I have noted that when trying to learn some from some transcriptions that the author may indicate four or five pages of music ..That makes the tune look loooooong.  Upon playing it I usually realize that the musician played nothing but variations on a basic theme.. It can be intimidating.  I've seen this with Benny Thomas transcriptions and also with transcriptions of Ragtime tunes.  The variations could go on for ever..On some tunes that I know well, I do the same thing. As some fiddlers say, "I've never played the same tune ONCE.".........



Which begs the question... When are you playing a tune, and when are you playing a variation?



 


Edited by - TuneWeaver on 06/19/2016 13:15:25

alaskafiddler - Posted - 06/20/2016:  15:01:51


 A common way is the addendum way.. to put a footnote on the just the measure(s) or phrases that are altered, marked with a letter (a), (b), (c)... and then show that measure below.

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