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 ARCHIVED TOPIC: Glory In the Meeting House


Please note this is an archived topic, so it is locked and unable to be replied to. You may, however, start a new topic and refer to this topic with a link: http://www.fiddlehangout.com/archive/43454

jpear - Posted - 01/25/2016:  06:35:18


Hello.



Does anybody have any idea if there is an original Irish version of Glory In the Meeting House (Collected from Kentucky Fiddler Luther Strong in 1937 by Alen Lomax)



 


fiddlepogo - Posted - 01/25/2016:  07:28:31


I did a search on The Fiddler's Companion website that is the place people tend to go for tune histories, and it shows no traceable history back to Ireland:



ceolas.org/cgi-bin/ht2/ht2-fc2...tinghouse



It's much easier to trace a tune that has a resemblance in the title to an Irish one, like "Red Haired Boy" or "Guilderoy" (Gaelic for "red haired boy").



Very often, the tunes that survived in this country were common ones at the time, and sometimes common to several countries, like Ireland, Scotland, and England.  There are tune collections from that period that give us an idea of what tunes were popular, and sometimes they became popular over here, like Molly Hare and Leather Breeches... but those are the American titles.



 


DeamhanFola - Posted - 01/25/2016:  10:47:35


quote:

Originally posted by fiddlepogo

 

I did a search on The Fiddler's Companion website that is the place people tend to go for tune histories, and it shows no traceable history back to Ireland:




ceolas.org/cgi-bin/ht2/ht2-fc2...tinghouse




It's much easier to trace a tune that has a resemblance in the title to an Irish one, like "Red Haired Boy" or "Guilderoy" (Gaelic for "red haired boy").




Very often, the tunes that survived in this country were common ones at the time, and sometimes common to several countries, like Ireland, Scotland, and England.  There are tune collections from that period that give us an idea of what tunes were popular, and sometimes they became popular over here, like Molly Hare and Leather Breeches... but those are the American titles.




 







Lest the word  'Guilderoy' be mistaken for the actual term for 'red-haired boy', the pedantic Gaeilgeoir in me feels the need to point out that it appears at best to be a phonetic representation of a mangling/non-Gaeilgeoir's pronunciation of the Irish term 'giolla rua'. Don't know what it would be as Gaeilge na hAlban, but not something too distant from it--I'll let the Scots answer that one.


carlb - Posted - 01/25/2016:  16:32:03


quote:

Originally posted by jpear

Does anybody have any idea if there is an original Irish version of Glory In the Meeting House (Collected from Kentucky Fiddler Luther Strong in 1937 by Alen Lomax)




Have you tried tunepal? It used to be exclusively for Irish tunes but now seems to have tunes from some other countrys.

tunepal.org/tunepal/index.php



Edited by - carlb on 01/25/2016 16:42:17

Addie - Posted - 01/25/2016:  17:32:19


Did someone call?  smiley



Gilderoy, an alias of the famous outlaw Patrick MacGregor, is indeed from gille ruadh.  Gilderoy lived about a century before his more famous cousin, Rob Ruadh.  Nice tune, Gilderoy.


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