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 ARCHIVED TOPIC: L1 L2 H1 H2 H3 H4


Please note this is an archived topic, so it is locked and unable to be replied to. You may, however, start a new topic and refer to this topic with a link: http://www.fiddlehangout.com/archive/43316

pinch - Posted - 01/09/2016:  08:06:40


What do the terms L1 L2 H1 H2 H3 H4 mean?  Are they finger positions?


pete_fiddle - Posted - 01/09/2016:  08:31:01


looks like, low 1st finger, low 2nd finger, high 1st finger???, high 2nd finger, high 3rd finger,high 4th finger, ?? somebody's idea of notation??? weird, even standard notation seems easy compared


DougD - Posted - 01/09/2016:  09:13:36


Yes, they are finger positions. Taking the D string as an example, L1 would be Eb, H1 is E, L2 would be F, H2 is F#, H3 would be G#. Not sure about "H4" - I guess it would be A#, but that seems like quite a stretch. At least I think that's right.



This may be used in fiddle Tab (?) and if so its one more example why standard notation is so superior.


Tbird - Posted - 01/09/2016:  12:48:26


Here's a good chart from the fiddleheads site that should help you visualize it. I use tab all the time and prefer it over notation.



fiddleheads.ca/downloads/Fiddl...ering.pdf


Addie - Posted - 01/09/2016:  13:49:16


You need big hands for H4.  I often use H4 for C on the E string. 


alaskafiddler - Posted - 01/09/2016:  15:07:18


quote:

Originally posted by DougD

 

Yes, they are finger positions. Taking the D string as an example, L1 would be Eb, H1 is E, L2 would be F, H2 is F#, H3 would be G#. Not sure about "H4" - I guess it would be A#, but that seems like quite a stretch. At least I think that's right.




This may be used in fiddle Tab (?) and if so its one more example why standard notation is so superior.







I think H4 would be the normal 4th finger. as opposed  to L4 - taking the D string example Eb(L1); F(L2); G(L3); Ab(L4) -for key of Eb -as opposed to Eb(L1); F(L2); G(L3); A(H4) for key of Bb.


pinch - Posted - 01/10/2016:  05:59:15


Here is what made me post the question:

     youtube.com/watch?v=X4GfG8YSeTo


ChickenMan - Posted - 01/10/2016:  07:25:58


Looks like a video game - Violin Hero! I personally could never follow that sort of thing. It is a fairly slow piece, why not utilize your ears some and let the 'tab' guide you when the notes go extra high. 



 


bsed - Posted - 01/10/2016:  10:23:14


OK. How are bowings depicted?  Or are they?



 



Edited by - bsed on 01/10/2016 10:23:46

Addie - Posted - 01/10/2016:  11:17:51


I think Alaska is right, H4 is normal 4.  C on the E string is extended 4.


alaskafiddler - Posted - 01/10/2016:  12:07:26


quote:

Originally posted by ChickenMan

 

Looks like a video game - Violin Hero! I personally could never follow that sort of thing. 




 







Wow, it does look like Violin Hero - (minus the fans to cheer or boo!)



An interesting visual idea on initial how to learn fingering for violin. For those who know video game format; this is just a similar idea, but actually playing the notes. Many get to be pretty fast, reading, fingering and timing on guitar hero. Really it is no speed difference than following tab (or notation), in some ways easier, and it does give the advantage it visually moves in time with the sound  You can slow the video play. It is similar to Rocksmith a learning to play elec guitar, though that gives feedback to accuracy.


alaskafiddler - Posted - 01/10/2016:  12:17:15


quote:

Originally posted by bsed

 

OK. How are bowings depicted?  Or are they?




 







On some of the videos the bowing is depicted to the left side.


Tbird - Posted - 01/10/2016:  12:21:18


quote:

Originally posted by bsed

 

OK. How are bowings depicted?  Or are they? 







Bowings can be shown using a variety of symbols. I've seen up and down arrows, V's and upside down V's, or V's and upside down bracket looking things.



And you usually don't see an H used unless it's a H3 which is the same as a L4. Most of the time it goes like this....L1...1...L2...2...3...H3 or L4...and 4. You'll also never see a L3 because that would be the same as a 2. This covers first position and about 99% of old time music. John at Bluegrassdaddy has put together a decent tab tutorial.



bluegrassdaddy.com/step-2-how-...e-lesson/


Joel Glassman - Posted - 01/13/2016:  17:01:27


I've written this sort of thing as tab for students -- its basically featuring 1-2L-2H-3 and 4

On the A string 1=B 2L=C 2H=C# 3=D 4=E

For basic fiddle tune keys, I think of the 1st 3rd and 4th fingers in a fixed place

and L or H means a half step lower or higher. Of course there is a 1L now and then, and 3H=4L depending on the fingering both = Eb on the A string



On a 4 line tab, each string GDAE = 1 line. Or on a 1 line tab, when its time to switch strings I'd write D2L--D3--A--A1--A2L which equals F G A B C. Its not meant to be sight read, just explain finger placement. I don't use this method often, but some folks like it. Computer programmers usually wink



Edited by - Joel Glassman on 01/13/2016 17:13:32

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