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 ARCHIVED TOPIC: need some chord progressions for Lydian


Please note this is an archived topic, so it is locked and unable to be replied to. You may, however, start a new topic and refer to this topic with a link: http://www.fiddlehangout.com/archive/42948

bluesmode - Posted - 11/25/2015:  14:00:32


Can anyone suggest some fairly simple chord progressions for Lydian mode in C? 2, 3 or 4 chords perhaps? the only one I've got in my practice sequencer is C to D/on C bass, but the pre-set background must lend itself to Lydian.



 



This may get tedious for some or most, but the reason I'm asking is that I tried those 'major scale in fourths' that I've been working on over C Lydian for the first time today, and the fourths sound fabulous with Lydian, like they were made for each other, and I would really appreciate a few more Lydian chord progressions to work with.



 



Just in case anyone is interested, C Lydian is a G maj. scale, so the fourths that go with it would be as follows, Starting on the open G, ascending.



GCDb, ADG, BEA, CGbB, DGC, EAD GbBE, GCF#, ADG, BEA, CF#B. I don't usually start these runs on the open G but rather on the D string.



 



I'm really excited about this because they sound so great over Lydian.



So if anyone knows some chords, and wants to teak a break from "phraising", Please help me out.



Thanks a lot.  


UsuallyPickin - Posted - 11/26/2015:  04:50:07


Check this site out.... R/

secretsofsongwriting.com/2014/...hey-work/

1.C Am D Em Am D C
2.C D/G C D G F#dim7 G Gmaj7/B C
3.C F#dim7 Bm Em Cmaj9 D G/D C
4.C Em Am F#dim Em D C G C
5.C D/C G/B C Am Bm/F# C/G G C

theimprovingmusician - Posted - 11/26/2015:  05:46:15


I was just going to jump in but it's been done! Those look great. The tricky thing about Lydian is the 5 chord is not a dominant 7th chord, but a major 7th chord instead. So there isn't quite that gravitational pull down like V7 to I in major.  It's almost as if the II7 chord functions as the dominant. Just be careful how you phrase it. 


bluesmode - Posted - 11/26/2015:  21:14:46


quote:

Originally posted by UsuallyPickin

 

Check this site out.... R/



secretsofsongwriting.com/2014/...hey-work/



1.C Am D Em Am D C

2.C D/G C D G F#dim7 G Gmaj7/B C

3.C F#dim7 Bm Em Cmaj9 D G/D C

4.C Em Am F#dim Em D C G C

5.C D/C G/B C Am Bm/F# C/G G C







Thanks a lot for taking the time to send me these progressions. I posted the same question on another site and got the exact same set of 5 progressions. My problem is going to be with the chords with a /bass note. I've got to be able to do these on guitar, and although I haven't really tried yet, I don't see how some of them would be do-able, but I know form previous limited experience with Lydian 'chords' that the bass note is fairly critical to turn the chords to "Lydian friendly" chords.



My other bit of a problem is that I hafta teach these chords to my jam guitar people which are only about 4 players and 3 of them are a bit limited in what they can do re: 'non standard' bar chords & and anything else that is a bit out of the ordinary. oh, well, if I get a few progressions I can just save 'em for guitar players who can do them.



One of these people has an excellent chord book so I had to look up the F#dim7. I found it was the same configuration as a min7b5 only different placement of course. I thought that Bmin7b5 would appear somewhere in these progressions, as it's the chord built around the 7th note of the scale (I think)



I also think add9 cords seem to be Lydian friendly, but they don't appear anywhere in these.



anyways, I've got enough to work on now. and I guess I should see what the web-site has to say before spouting off too much. It may tell me about how many measures I need for the chord groupings.



..... as usual I talk a lot.... thanks again to Usually Pickin.



 



 



 



 



 



 



 



 



 



 



 



 



 



 



 


bluesmode - Posted - 11/26/2015:  21:34:04


quote:

Originally posted by theimprovingmusician

 

> Just be careful how you phrase it. 


 




I had to smile when I saw that last linewink



 



but I totally agree with you. Lydian does seem to require more care with phrasing than other modes.... there's just something about that raised fourth that's.... wonderful !?  ok I've just gotta do it.... reprint my 'ode to Lydian haiku' when I began to 'hear' it for the first time.



 



I have found you now



hiding there in the raised fourth



Come Lydian; dance.


mmuussiiccaall - Posted - 11/26/2015:  22:35:32


Here's my "Just get it over with" chart!



bluesmode - Posted - 11/27/2015:  02:07:27


well, I'm stunned. All I can say is 'I wish I had a printer.'

theimprovingmusician - Posted - 11/27/2015:  07:02:57


Here's a sheet I made for my 8th grade students who wanted to "jam" in the tonalities after the work we had done in my general music class teaching them the resting tone, and primary functions. Some keys are more keyboard/guitar friendly. I didn't include Locrian, because nobody played a diminished chord. 



docs.google.com/document/d/1EF...p=sharing


bluesmode - Posted - 11/27/2015:  22:01:14


Allright !! finally a simple 4 chord progression the jammers can repeat. I got it from the Primary Functions from T.I.M.'s post. For key of F lydian..... F, G, Em, Am. I can do my Cmaj scale in fourths (and whatever else) over this, and demo Lydian for these guys. The lady I mainly jam with has some arthritis in her hands and has some trouble bar-ing a Bmin, so the same progression for C lydian would be more difficult for her. I can teach some of the more difficult progressions to other Guitar players.



 



So I blew the dust off my Telecaster, referenced a chord book and got the dim7 & Maj9 chords. I particularly liked the Maj9 for lydian...I'll see if I can figure a couple of progressions with those chords.



 



Many Thanks to y'all for patience and tolerance in helping me out with this.  



 



 


mmuussiiccaall - Posted - 11/29/2015:  12:55:33


Using my chart you can pick your mode and use any of the  chords with the root of your mode as your tonic and add in any of the other chords in that row and not break out of the modal harmony. In your above example you wanted F Lydian and the the chords used were F G Em Am, notice you used an F type of chord for the tonic and the other 3 chords are also found in that row. With this chart you could make up a zillion combinations of chord progressions that stay within the mode chosen!


bluesmode - Posted - 12/02/2015:  01:17:05


@mmuussiiccaall do you mean that I could use any chord or chords in the line directly under C Lydian, the line that starts with G and ends with Abm+9 ??  Does the plus sign in Abm+9 mean add9 or sharp 9?



I did not understand how it worked on the first look, but if it works like the above example, it would be extremely helpful. 



I appreciate very much that you didn't just let this slide, and gave me another chance at understanding it.



I guess I could log in from a computer that had a printer and print this off? 



This is an amazing chart!! Thank you so much.



 


mmuussiiccaall - Posted - 12/02/2015:  18:05:09


quote:

Originally posted by bluesmode

 

@mmuussiiccaall do you mean that I could use any chord or chords in the line directly under C Lydian, the line that starts with G and ends with Abm+9 ??  Does the plus sign in Abm+9 mean add9 or sharp 9?




I did not understand how it worked on the first look, but if it works like the above example, it would be extremely helpful. 




I appreciate very much that you didn't just let this slide, and gave me another chance at understanding it.




I guess I could log in from a computer that had a printer and print this off? 




This is an amazing chart!! Thank you so much.




 







It's just simple logic extrapolated, the beginning point was when I thought about a C major scale being all naturals so any chord with only naturals would harmonize with that scale. So I just thought about every chord I could think of that did not have a sharp or a flat and happened to come up with 30 ( I have since added Bm7-5 to the C row for Locrian mode songs) Once I had the first row it was then just a matter of transposition to generate the rest.



BTW it is add9 and use any of those chords in the row.



Edited by - mmuussiiccaall on 12/02/2015 18:06:06

bluesmode - Posted - 12/02/2015:  21:51:52


@mmuussiiccaall to you it may be simple logic extrapolated, to me it's incredible.


a couple of more questions Please. What are the 6/9 chords called? I will need to look a lot of these chords up in a guitar chord book (good thing I play guitar also) Thanks for giving me a heads up about the Bm7b5 for the C row. Isn't this also known as half-diminished written with a little o with a slash thru it? I use min7b5 arps a lot, as I got info from a youtube guitar teacher on how to apply them to any mode. Turns out I've known and memorized these arps for 25 years from Jamie Aebersold, BUT, I knew them as minor 6 arps, which is just an inversion of min7b5 arps. So I was able to 'catch on' to the you tube teaching quite easily. I've written these out in a chart for the modes, but I list them as min6 because that's how I memorized them and 'think' them. eg: Cmin6 arps = Amin7b5 arps.

Also, do you teach? What is your primary instrument? What kind of violin/fiddle style(s) do you play?

mmuussiiccaall - Posted - 12/03/2015:  07:48:18


well how about another chart



bluesmode - Posted - 12/03/2015:  19:11:07


..... between these two charts and a comprehensive guitar chord book, I should have everything covered. Yahoo!


mmuussiiccaall - Posted - 12/04/2015:  04:29:40


Here's the chart for that, it will take some analysis but if you can figure it out you can play any chord in any inversion and know why your fingers are placed where they are as opposed to memorizing thousands of pictures of dots.



bluesmode - Posted - 12/04/2015:  17:18:08


I think I'll just stick to my comprehensive guitar chord book. This is waay more info than I'd ever use mapped out for guitar. I don't even like guitar that much, compared to violin. When I feel like getting my guitar playing friends a bit revved up, I tell them that compared to violin, the guitar is a barbaric instrument, like a fence post strung with barbed wire,  although I can play pretty decent lead guitar in certain genres. All I need guitar for these days is showing the jam people a few modal progressions. 



 



strange thing is .... there's a lot more guitar players who understand what I do with modes than violin/fiddle players, but I guess that's understandable.



Edited by - bluesmode on 12/04/2015 17:25:44

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