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 ARCHIVED TOPIC: Blues scale


Please note this is an archived topic, so it is locked and unable to be replied to. You may, however, start a new topic and refer to this topic with a link: http://www.fiddlehangout.com/archive/41946

fiddlekook - Posted - 07/16/2015:  00:05:45


ok, sorry but I'm a total beginner however, I am enthusiastic about this, and I need some solid energy from you blues players out there.  I want to learn how to play fiddle blues, and my past theory says to take the major scale, then convert to the pentatonic, (which is 1,2,3,5,6 ) notes of the key signature.  Then to make it blues, turn the third note flat and viola I have the major pentatonic Blues scale.  The other option was to Wikipedia, and it states to play a blues scale in the "minor" way, which is to play 1,flat3,4,flat 5, natural 5, flat7,   While this is a "sad" style of blues, I'm after a happy major scale blues. My question for your theory guys, is whether I need to learn both styles? 



If so, and if i go with the major pentatonic scale, flat the 3rd. Is the natural third and flat third the only place where I can bend a note? Because if this is true, it doesn't really give me a lot of blues flexibility. 



Is there logic to what I just wrote? Help me please.  I just watched a guy named Patrick contreras on YouTube called,"hot blues fiddle".  It's basically why I went out and purchased a beginner 2500.00 fiddle and bow. Please I need some feedback, this thing sounds amazing. 



 



 



 



 



 


fiddlepogo - Posted - 07/16/2015:  05:04:38


I'm not familiar with Mr. Contreras.



I play blues more on electric guitar, and more Old Time on fiddle.



However, the scales are the same, whether the blues is on guitar or fiddle.  But, I play mostly pentatonic minor blues.  The flat 5 is definitely a bendable note.  But "bending" is guitar terminology... fiddlers don't bend, they just play it flat then slide up to the final pitch.



You've got a challenge going however.... you are a total beginner, but want to play blues fiddle?  That sounds like a tall order.



There are things you need to learn about intonation and bow control.  Those things might be easier to learn with a fixed tune rather than improvisation.  There are tunes you could learn that would have some application for blues, St. James Infirmary, Frankie and Johnnie, House of the Rising Sun, Stormy Monday, etc.



You play the tune, you make a mistake, well, next time around, you try to play it better.



One fellow whose blues demo video really impressed me is Darol Anger.  One thing I've noticed with guitar is that the bends sound wild and free, but they are actually very precise.  It's really common for guitarists to bend sharp, when they really shouldn't.   Fiddlers tend to do the same thing too... they'll slide sharp of the right stopping point.  Darol Anger's slides are right on, to my ears.



Well, that's my 2 cents, and that's about all it's worth, since I'm not really playing blues on fiddle myself.  Maybe someone who is will see this thread though, and set both you and me straight on this.  Good luck!


fiddlerjoebob - Posted - 07/16/2015:  05:28:31


I have seen those blue fiddles. Too crazy.  I like the natural wood myself.



 


martynspeck - Posted - 07/16/2015:  07:39:05


quote:

Originally posted by fiddlekook

 

ok, sorry but I'm a total beginner however, I am enthusiastic about this, and I need some solid energy from you blues players out there.  I want to learn how to play fiddle blues, and my past theory says to take the major scale, then convert to the pentatonic, (which is 1,2,3,5,6 ) notes of the key signature.  Then to make it blues, turn the third note flat and viola I have the major pentatonic Blues scale.  The other option was to Wikipedia, and it states to play a blues scale in the "minor" way, which is to play 1,flat3,4,flat 5, natural 5, flat7,   While this is a "sad" style of blues, I'm after a happy major scale blues. My question for your theory guys, is whether I need to learn both styles? 




If so, and if i go with the major pentatonic scale, flat the 3rd. Is the natural third and flat third the only place where I can bend a note? Because if this is true, it doesn't really give me a lot of blues flexibility. 




Is there logic to what I just wrote? Help me please.  I just watched a guy named Patrick contreras on YouTube called,"hot blues fiddle".  It's basically why I went out and purchased a beginner 2500.00 fiddle and bow. Please I need some feedback, this thing sounds amazing. 




 




 




 




 




 







I hope that was supposed to read "beginner $250.00 bow". smiley



Remember to crawl before you walk but once you can play in tune and learn the major scales and the mixolydian scales, start learning how to make them blue.



I'll throw in a shout out for Darol's lessons here. He advertises here and includes blues and jazz fiddle in is lessons. artistworks.com/fiddle-lessons-darol-anger


fujers - Posted - 07/16/2015:  07:52:14


Blues



Blues Licks

   

Dick Hauser - Posted - 07/16/2015:  08:50:14


I wanted to learn how to make my tunes sound a little more "bluesy". I bought Craig Duncan's "Blues Fiddling Classics" book/CD. The book contains notation for 25 Blues fiddling classics. All tunes are recorded on the CD. I already knew the basic blues scale and was more interested on how the tunes were constructed and the musical phrases the tunes used. The book has basic notation/music for each tune, and several more advanced versions of each tune. If you see the book on the shelf in a music store, you might check it out. I really like the music and play the CD just to hear the tunes.

BTW, the notation is identical to the music that is played. It is complete musical notation, not "stripped down" basic versions. What you see is what you hear.

Lonesome Fiddler - Posted - 07/16/2015:  10:27:46


I gotta tell 'ya, I've found the fiddle to be an absolutely superb instrument for playing the blues. No frets!  Slide your way up to just south of the dominant seventh, or to the dominant seventh if you want to sound more big-city sophisticated. Slide your way all the way to the major seventh for a major, jazzy style blues.  Then slide back down to show how down home you are.  When you go for the minor third, wind up slightly north.  If you hit the minor third straight on, you sound like a slumming classical player .



As for the bow, it gives you the sustain of a saxophone.  Or of an electric guitar played through a fuzz-pedal or overdriven tube amp.   And don't forget to lay plenty of vibrato on the sustained notes.  Slow to moderate vibrato.  Don't play it too fast.  But play it wide. 


pete_fiddle - Posted - 07/16/2015:  10:39:34


quote:

Originally posted by Lonesome Fiddler

 

I gotta tell 'ya, I've found the fiddle to be an absolutely superb instrument for playing the blues. No frets!  Slide your way up to just south of the dominant seventh, or to the dominant seventh if you want to sound more big-city sophisticated. Slide your way all the way to the major seventh for a major, jazzy style blues.  Then slide back down to show how down home you are.  When you go for the minor third, wind up slightly north.  If you hit the minor third straight on, you sound like a slumming classical player .




As for the bow, it gives you the sustain of a saxophone.  Or of an electric guitar played through a fuzz-pedal or overdriven tube amp.   And don't forget to lay plenty of vibrato on the sustained notes.  Slow to moderate vibrato.  Don't play it too fast.  But play it wide. 







good stuff cheers


ChickenMan - Posted - 07/16/2015:  12:50:06


quote:
Originally posted by fiddlekook



Is there logic to what I just wrote? Help me please.  I just watched a guy named Patrick contreras on YouTube called,"hot blues fiddle".  It's basically why I went out and purchased a beginner 2500.00 fiddle and bow. Please I need some feedback, this thing sounds amazing. 





FYI that is WAAAY more fiddle than most "beginners" start with unless they definitely plan to become a serious concert violinist. Sounds to me like you've got a good idea of what notes are involved. Play any other instruments? If so, know that the fiddle is much harder to learn, so be prepared for a lot of less than pleasing sound on your journey.

mmuussiiccaall - Posted - 07/16/2015:  13:59:04


Notice, if you play Major pentatonic 1 2 3 5 6 and minor pentatonic 1 b3 4 5 b7 the common numbers are the 1 & 5. To change from one scale to the other it is just a matter of moving the red numbers up or down a half step, ex. 2/b3  3/4  6/b7



 



​visualize this on the attached chart



Edited by - mmuussiiccaall on 07/16/2015 14:04:15



pentatonics

   

fiddlekook - Posted - 07/17/2015:  09:31:32


THANK YOU! 

Originally posted by mmuussiiccaall

 

Notice, if you play Major pentatonic 1 2 3 5 6 and minor pentatonic 1 b3 4 5 b7 the common numbers are the 1 & 5. To change from one scale to the other it is just a matter of moving the red numbers up or down a half step, ex. 2/b3  3/4  6/b7




 




​visualize this on the attached chart







 


mmuussiiccaall - Posted - 07/17/2015:  10:03:24


BTW there are 4 possiblities:



minor pentatonic over a minor key (sad result - remain in tonic key) ex THE THRILL IS GONE in Bm - B.B. King



minor pentatonic over a major key (blues result - remain in tonic key) ex. PRIDE AND JOY in E - Stevie Ray Vaughn



major pentatonic over a major key (country blues result - the pentatonic scale must follow the chord changes) ex. YOUNGBLOOD in A - Bad Co



minor and major pentatonic over a major key (uptown blues result - remain in tonic key) ex. the YouTube video you mention in E



Edited by - mmuussiiccaall on 07/17/2015 10:07:18

haggis - Posted - 07/18/2015:  17:26:04


For a Blues beginner I think as far as pentatonics go the most important concept to get a handle on is the idea that the notes in a major pentatonic scale are also a minor pentatonic scale ,using the same notes. You may have to chew on this idea?

fiddlebut - Posted - 07/18/2015:  20:19:19


quote:

Originally posted by haggis

 

 major pentatonic scale are also a minor pentatonic scale ,using the same notes.







Ah yes, the minor is the inverted  major, each having different tonal centres...


fiddlenbanjo - Posted - 07/19/2015:  18:04:43


The way I learned it, major blues scale (M) includes both the natural and flat 3rd - 1, 2, b3, 3, 5, 6.

The minor blues scale(m), as has been said - 1, b3, 4, b5, 5, b7.

Good blues, even major key, happy/bright sounding blues will use both of these scales. Minor scale phrases/licks are often used to add musical tension by way of contrast against the main feel of the tune, which is major.

This is a lot to bite off for a true beginner, but I think anyone can benefit from just playing these two scales as part of your practice routine. They have a very distinct sound and will force your ear to really hear the note qualities. Those 2 scales together comprise every note except 2, the b2 and the #5. There's a lot of ear and finger training involved in being able to play those 2 scales correctly, even slowly. For anyone wanting to one day improvise in western style music, woodshedding these scales is a GREAT place to start.

violinonfire - Posted - 07/20/2015:  00:15:25


hey there fiddlekook, glad you liked the video! it was a little jam in my front room, we we're having some fun.. i could write a whole book on this …but to keep it short blues is something i totally picked up by ear. I went to blues jams and took my lumps and tried to come back better.. when I do solo on the blues, I don't think about it..i really just let the music flow from inside out. improv is something i've had to consciously work on



I learned alot from imitating some of my favorite players Albert King, Jimmy Reed, Hendrix, SRV..i listen to the way the slide how fast or slow they vibrato and also listen for the distinct language of each player and try to transfer that to violin. If your a beginner, you definitely want to get comfortable with your fiddle and build a basic technique…bowing, scales, vibrato…this will give you color to work with.



some blues violinists i dig -- don sugarcane harris, papa john creach, also stuff smith..more of a bop jazzer, but he definitely leans on blues. here's one of his videos - youtube.com/watch?v=5J0t-Fgn6AE



a bit of shameful self promotion -- i'm hosting a bb king tribute show here in fresno, ca august 1st at fulton 55 if you live near you should come out! ill be bringing some of the areas best blues players in to join me. i was asked to open for mr bb king new years eve 2009 and ill never forget it, this will be a chance to honor this great man and his music. heres a link to the event -- facebook.com/events/1643810139163800/



patrick contreras



Edited by - violinonfire on 07/20/2015 00:16:54

fujers - Posted - 07/20/2015:  20:10:14


Depending on what kind of blues your looking for most of it is found just by flatting your 3rd or 5th or seventh.

There is more scale pattern that you could use but I would get my feet wet using these. Just a thought. Jerry

fiddlebut - Posted - 07/20/2015:  21:37:00


quote:

Originally posted by fujers

 

Depending on what kind of blues your looking for







Yeah, I was playing a kind of 'Eastern Blues'..the notes I was playing were....1 b2 3 4 5 6 b7


pete_fiddle - Posted - 07/21/2015:  00:24:21


quote:

Originally posted by chops_butcher

 
quote:


Originally posted by fujers

 


Depending on what kind of blues your looking for








Yeah, I was playing a kind of 'Eastern Blues'..the notes I was playing were....1 b2 3 4 5 6 b7







Mixolidian b9, 5th mode of the Harmonic Major


snakefinger - Posted - 07/21/2015:  03:27:07


Check this one out fiddlekook, the mighty Steve Wickham giving the blues guitarists a run for their money on the fiddle.



youtube.com/watch?v=5R1aYl4Z0g0


fiddlebut - Posted - 07/21/2015:  14:31:06


quote:

Originally posted by pete_fiddle

  




Mixolidian b9, 5th mode of the Harmonic Major







Yes...........I know...........


fiddlebut - Posted - 07/21/2015:  15:32:24


quote:

Originally posted by chops_butcher

 
quote:


Originally posted by pete_fiddle

  





Mixolidian b9, 5th mode of the Harmonic Major








Yes...........I know...........







Actually it is the Phrygian sharp 3 ( I forgot to flat the 6th...1b2 3 4 5 b6 b7 )



5th mode of the Harmonic minor...AKA Spanish mode.


fujers - Posted - 07/21/2015:  15:49:18


Sounds a bit technical to me. But really if the wants to learn blues fiddle he should just start with the basics and move up.

Remember he's going from not knowing anything. Make it simple for him to understand. He can always learn more as those gates open up. Jerry

pete_fiddle - Posted - 07/21/2015:  23:53:06


for me thinking modally is about the simplest way to describe different scales,there are only seven modes and every thing else(7 note modes) can be described as an altered mode, i think it may be a good place for folk to start if they want to study scales.i think i've probably posted this before but this is the best free program i have found for studying music theory scales/ear training and more.(it helps me anyway) has anyone found any others ?





gnu.org/software/solfege/



 


fiddlebut - Posted - 07/22/2015:  14:29:44


quote:

Originally posted by pete_fiddle

 

 thinking modally is about the simplest way to describe different scales,


 




 



 



Good one Pete............


bluesmode - Posted - 09/18/2015:  03:09:19


here's how I've always thought this out.
E aeolian = G Ionian. same for the 2 types of blues scales.
E blues scale (minor, sad, hard, however you want to put it - E G A Bb B D E
G inversion (happy, country , swingy, 'major' G A Bb B D E G
I think it was Chops Butcher who said one is an inversion of the other.

For me, this is an easy way to do it, and I guess this would be modal thinking. If you know one scale, you know the inversion, and I slide in and out of the blue note for each one. In this key it would be the Bb for both. Stating the obvious (I guess) since it's modal inversions you would need to resolve (center around) either the E or the G.

Am I just re-stating whats already been said?

fujers - Posted - 09/21/2015:  16:37:56


Interesting. You know you could take these same scales and play inversions to them all. Where as you don't start on the tonic you ship a note and start from there.

There is no note for to start or end anything. It is what is in your mind that counts. If you could say something, anything comes to your mind you had better pay attention to it. Your brain is talking to you.

Crazy things we do I guess.....but that's what we do. Goto go....lessons

fiddlebut - Posted - 09/21/2015:  19:33:39


quote:

Originally posted by fujers

 

It is what is in your mind that counts.



If you could say something, anything comes to your mind you had better pay attention to it.



Your brain is talking to you.





 







Jerry is on to something here.....



It's all about attitude...hold on to a feeling, focus on it and try to channel it through your playing.



But...you must invert everything..! It will sound pretty boring if you start every phrase on the same note every time...!?



 



 


fujers - Posted - 09/21/2015:  20:39:30


Exactly Henry, Why not start whatever you're going to play on another note from the tonic. Why not start on the 3rd or the b5 or whatever the note you choose.

Be a little careful to what note you choose because notes can lead you in the wrong way...always stay within your framework.

Framework!!!

This is the basis of understanding anything. If you have a frame on your foundation you can built it can you not?

The same goes with fiddling. You can not build on what you don't have. You are going to have to apply many hours, days, weeks, months ,years to this thing.

Are you ready to put what it takes to get good or halfway descent.

I believe that most of us have it in us....I also believe that anyone can play to whatever extent that is.....well it's up to them....I couldn't tell you....but perhaps there' another Paganini reading what we say.

Now wouldn't be great to have another Paganini? I think it would. Jerry









bluesmode - Posted - 09/21/2015:  20:40:39


quote:

Originally posted by chops_butcher

 
quote:


 It will sound pretty boring if you start every phrase on the same note every time...!?



 



 



 






this is precisely why I've practiced all the major scales & blues scales and Pents up & down over all 4 strings, From the G string to the pinky stretch on the E string, both open and closed. if you can do them closed in the first position. then all those patterns are recognizable when you shift up into the 3rd & 4th position (which is about as high as I get). imo, when you get this down, then you can work on that 'feeling' that Jerry & Henry were just talking about. In my case, it took me quite a while (years) to get this down, and I of course worked on the 'feeling' along the way, but once you have this foundation fairly solid, you can get your 'mind' out of the way, and let the music take over. That's the goal, is it not?



 



PS. Jerry got his post in while I was typing mine, but it looks like we were thinking pretty much the same thing. 



Edited by - bluesmode on 09/21/2015 20:44:33

fiddlebut - Posted - 09/21/2015:  21:15:05


quote:

Originally posted by fujers



Framework!!!



 







 



Absolutely...! ! !



 



The chords and scales form the 'framework' to build on, and you can deviate from that with chromatics and accidentals.



But you must always return the frame work or.......ya'll be off key...hehe....................


fujers - Posted - 09/21/2015:  21:24:29


Dave you have it!!!!

this is precisely why I've practiced all the major scales & blues scales and Pents up & down over all 4 strings, From the G string to the pinky stretch on the E string, both open and closed. if you can do them closed in the first position. then all those patterns are recognizable when you shift up into the 3rd & 4th position (which is about as high as I get). imo, when you get this down, then you can work on that 'feeling' that Jerry & Henry were just talking about. In my case, it took me quite a while (years) to get this down, and I of course worked on the 'feeling' along the way, but once you have this foundation fairly solid, you can get your 'mind' out of the way, and let the music take over. That's the goal, is it not?



PS. Jerry got his post in while I was typing mine, but it looks like we were thinking pretty much the same thing.

PS; It will take you a long time to get good at 3rd and 4th but don't let it stop you. Many a great tune plays that high and I can't right now now think of a neary one of them.

PSS: Don't let anything stop you. Jerry

bluesmode - Posted - 09/28/2015:  00:05:13


quote:

Originally posted by pete_fiddle

 

    




 



Mixolidian b9, 5th mode of the Harmonic Major

 




some questions please: is Harmonic 'Major" a typo? Should it not read Harmonic minor? but if there is a Harmonic Major, how does it differ from Ionian. if it is Harmonic minor. then is there another 7 different modes derived from the Harmonic minor scale. Do they work the same as the regular 'church modes'? That is, are they all Harmonic minor scales, just played played in different places with the applicable resolutions etc.? What kind of chord backgrounds would go with harmonic minor modes?


alaskafiddler - Posted - 09/28/2015:  12:24:40


quote:

Originally posted by bluesmode

 
quote:


Originally posted by pete_fiddle

 

    





 



Mixolidian b9, 5th mode of the Harmonic Major

 






some questions please: is Harmonic 'Major" a typo? Should it not read Harmonic minor? but if there is a Harmonic Major, how does it differ from Ionian. if it is Harmonic minor. then is there another 7 different modes derived from the Harmonic minor scale. Do they work the same as the regular 'church modes'? That is, are they all Harmonic minor scales, just played played in different places with the applicable resolutions etc.? What kind of chord backgrounds would go with harmonic minor modes?







Not the same as church modes.



Harmonic minor is referring to the regular "natural" minor mode (Aeolian) but with a raised 7th. 1, 2, m3, P4, P5,, m6, and M7 - This is more about harmony and chords than melodic use (although some composers did use it); the raised 7 is serving as a major third to the V7 chord, utilizing the same turn, cadence, and leading tone, back into the tonic and home chord or tonality; home is just minor rather than major. (the V7 is preferred in these compositions over the minor version v) - For example, if you were in Am, the E7 rather than the Em, serves to want to better push back into the Am. (has to do with the tritone); as well the g# wants to lead into the A note.



There is also the idea of "melodic" minor - and it involves altering the 6 and 7 - supposedly depending on if the melody is ascending or descending.



Edited by - alaskafiddler on 09/28/2015 12:28:32

fiddlebut - Posted - 09/28/2015:  20:09:46


It is a typo, but there is a Harmonic 'Major' scale. The difference is the minor third or the major third note of the scale.


pete_fiddle - Posted - 09/28/2015:  21:26:45


with respect "Harmonic Major" isn't or wasn't a typo,it is a scale and ergo has it's modes, the 5th of which (mixolydian b9) was described in an earlier post by Henry


bluesmode - Posted - 09/28/2015:  21:28:55


quote:

Originally posted by alaskafiddler

 
quote: 


 

    





 





  





  





Not the same as church modes.




 







Ok, thanks a lot alaskafiddler for clearing this up for me.


pete_fiddle - Posted - 09/28/2015:  21:50:04


seems i differ from alaskafiddler here, in that i think of the harmonic minor scale as a scale complete in it's self and having its own modes/chords etc,not as an altered natural minor, or an altered/aolian mode,



i think of the melodic minor ascending/descending,and the jazz minor (same as the melodic minor ascending),similarly.



Edit: and the blues scales as minor pent+ #4(minor),and its inversions



Edited by - pete_fiddle on 09/28/2015 21:59:17

bluesmode - Posted - 09/28/2015:  21:54:32


quote:

Originally posted by chops_butcher

 
quote:


Originally posted by chops_butcher

 


quote:

   

    





  





Actually it is the Phrygian sharp 3 ( I forgot to flat the 6th...1b2 3 4 5 b6 b7 )




5th mode of the Harmonic minor...AKA Spanish mode.







Chops Butcher: I've always thought that the Phrygian mode (played over a Major chord)  sounded very Spanish, but I tried it with the sharp 3, and whoa Nellie, now that's Spanish! When you wrote it out above... I b2 3 4 5 b6 b7..... to be exactly correct, wouldn't it be  I b2 #3 4 5 b6 b7 ?



Not trying to be nit-picky, just wanna make sure I've got things right. So I guess a Phrygian  sharp 3 is the 5th mode of the Harmonic minor. Still not quite understanding that, but that Spanish mode sure do sound nice! Thanks for that scale.


bluesmode - Posted - 09/28/2015:  22:06:55


quote:

Originally posted by pete_fiddle

 

seems i differ from alaskafiddler here, in that i think of the harmonic minor scale as a scale complete in it's self and having its own modes/chords etc,not as an altered natural minor, or an altered/aolian mode,




i think of the melodic minor ascending/descending,and the jazz minor (same as the melodic minor ascending),similarly.







Pete: I did a bit of research into the harmonic minor scale modes on the internet a few years ago, and from what I can remember, this scale had it's own set of modes, that's why I was confused about the whole thing. doggone it, I just can't go web surfing about it until I get an anti-virus installed in this machine. but I hafta say, at this point, I think I agree with your take on it.



So now, I'm gonna hafta try out that melodic minor ascending for a jazz minor and see if I can see what that's about. Man, It's hard to keep up sometimes !!! 


pete_fiddle - Posted - 09/28/2015:  22:51:58


Dave see if this link works, it's a help file in a program called GNU Solfege that i use



docs.solfege.org/3.20/C/scales/modes.html



(seems to work for me)



Edited by - pete_fiddle on 09/28/2015 22:53:26

fiddlebut - Posted - 09/28/2015:  22:52:04


quote:

Originally posted by pete_fiddle

 

with respect "Harmonic Major" isn't or wasn't a typo,it is a scale and ergo has it's modes, the 5th of which (mixolydian b9) was described in an earlier post by Henry







Quite correct, sorry, I actually made the typo thus creating the mixo b9



The scale degrees 1 2  3 4 5 6 7 8 are designated to  the major scale..thus tonic, M2 M3 P4 P5 M6 M7.



The Phrygian scale  has 1 b2 b3 4 5 b6 b7 8. The Spanish mode needs a Sharp 3..thus, it is sharped..1 b2 3 4 5 b6 b7 8



 


pete_fiddle - Posted - 09/28/2015:  22:55:54


No problem Henry these threads get knotted all the time :o)



cheers Pete


fiddlebut - Posted - 09/29/2015:  00:57:37


quote:

Originally posted by pete_fiddle

 

No problem Henry these threads get knotted all the time :o)




cheers Pete







LOL.....The penny just dropped.


bluesmode - Posted - 09/29/2015:  01:30:28


quote:

Originally posted by chops_butcher

 
quote:






  



 

The scale degrees 1 2  3 4 5 6 7 8 are designated to  the major scale..thus tonic, M2 M3 P4 P5 M6 M7.




The Phrygian scale  has 1 b2 b3 4 5 b6 b7 8. The Spanish mode needs a Sharp 3..thus, it is sharped..1 b2 3 4 5 b6 b7 8




 







....... I was just out having a smoke and I was thinking that Phrygian has a b3, so 1 b2 3 4 5 b6 b7  would be correct for the Spanish mode, and I was also thinking 'I wonder if Henry will have me corrected by the time I get back in'. laugh



 



What does the P in P4  & P5 stand for ?  Thanks.


pete_fiddle - Posted - 09/29/2015:  01:44:59


if i can answer for Henry that would be Perfect 4th and Perfect 5th


fiddlebut - Posted - 09/29/2015:  01:46:39


wow, you take long smokos...3 and half hours. !



P is for perfect intervals


bluesmode - Posted - 09/29/2015:  02:16:57


......you guys prolly won't believe this, But, I was out having another smoke and it came to me in a flash..... P has got to stand for Perfect 4ths & 5ths. and then again I thought 'I wonder if I'll have that reply when I get back in'.

must be some spooky stuff going on here...... great fun !!

alaskafiddler - Posted - 09/29/2015:  09:29:25


quote:

Originally posted by bluesmode


but if there is a Harmonic Major, how does it differ from Ionian. 




Uses a minor 6; leaving a step and half between the 6 and 7.

 1 2  M3  P4  P5  m6  M7


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