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 ARCHIVED TOPIC: Study Music at Yale, FREE


Please note this is an archived topic, so it is locked and unable to be replied to. You may, however, start a new topic and refer to this topic with a link: http://www.fiddlehangout.com/archive/40547

Addie - Posted - 02/12/2015:  11:37:23


Listening to Music with Craig Wright on Youtube.



Actually quite interesting... I'm on lecture 14 now.   



Lots of review, many new ways to look at things, not often boring... I do one lecture a day.




amwildman - Posted - 02/12/2015:  20:33:15


Addie, is this guy teaching with a classical background?  Surely it has been shown by certain people on this forum that classical musicians aren't really musicians.  And they certainly don't listen.  Yale must be going down the drain, teaching drivel like this. 


FacePalm - Posted - 02/13/2015:  00:02:56


Even though I studied music history, literature and theory for a whole year at night school in the mid 70's,



I reckon there's gonna be some really very interesting stuff in these videos, can't wait to sit down and listen.



 



Thanks............


amwildman - Posted - 02/13/2015:  00:18:20


Addie, I somehow lost 6 of my course CDs.  Can I borrow yours while I'm awaiting my replacements?


Addie - Posted - 02/13/2015:  08:51:15


 


quote:


Originally posted by amwildman

 

Addie, I somehow lost 6 of my course CDs.  Can I borrow yours while I'm awaiting my replacements?







Well, congratulations on making it at least halfway through lecture one.  cheeky



Be careful though.  Once you've "done Classical" you're tainted for life.  If you play OT and talk with a drawl now, people will just say you're faking it.  wink



 "He must be from New York City!" 



"New York City?!!!!!"


wooliver - Posted - 02/13/2015:  09:04:59


Thank you.



One good post deserves another:



youtube.com/watch?v=Un3p614XExc



I could be the late to the table on Kenny Werner and Effortless Mastery, but I'm glad i found him eventually.



Yes, his ax is a piano, but that part doesn't matter. You can cash in on your successes most any time, and just enjoy yourself.



 



 



 



Edited by - wooliver on 02/13/2015 09:14:01

Addie - Posted - 02/13/2015:  09:26:13


Where can I get a hat like that?  smiley



I'm watching it now, thanks.  He has some interesting things to say... "diseased state of mind" VS "comfort zone".  Wow.



"You cannot afford to criticize yourself during a performance"    absolutely!!!!!!  Stick it away for later.


rastewart - Posted - 02/13/2015:  09:34:14


Thanks, Addie and Wooliver.  I am bookmarking both of these.  (As it happens, my other ax, or one of my other axes, is a piano.)  One of my regrets is letting the formal study of music fall by the wayside in college, and I'm happy to see these resources to catch up a little.



I will add a link as well.  I listen quite a lot to WFMT, Chicago's classical-music station (and WDCB for jazz).  In particular, Bill McLaughlin's Exploring Music is practically a course of music education in itself.


wooliver - Posted - 02/13/2015:  13:12:14


It's inevitable at some point each of us peaks or plateaus. The better prepared for this, the better. If you start to stink, back up or slow down until you don't stink and enjoy yourself. There's a lot of good things that come from this point, where you can say to yourself, "I got this."



 



(that may not be the cliff notes, but what i came away with)



Edited by - wooliver on 02/13/2015 13:16:35

withnall - Posted - 02/13/2015:  20:38:05


I don't think it's inevitable that we will peak or plateau. I DO think that usually our desire to be better than we currently are peaks. But truly, if we wanted to be better then more learning, more playing, more listening, more work etc will surely help make us better than we are--maybe not help us make big strides but we WILL get better. It's just that mostly we reach a point where we're "good enough for ourselves" and so the work and sacrifices required to get better than "good enough for ourselves" becomes too much effort.
Rage against the ennui my friends, rage against the ennui.
:-)
Ellie

wooliver - Posted - 02/16/2015:  09:21:52


quote:


Originally posted by withnall


 But truly, if we wanted to be better then more learning, more playing, more listening, more work etc will surely help make us better than we are--maybe not help us make big strides but we WILL get better. 

 




You're thinking in terms of a student/learner. I'm thinking in terms of a lifetime. Yes, we're all dedicated lifetime learners, but, it's a scientific fact we all get old and die. It may be five minutes before you die, but everybody will reach peak performance individually. I'm talking about physical peak performance due to aging. Taking that one step more, and being able to enjoy one's musical efforts, past this apex point.


fiddlenbanjo - Posted - 06/02/2015:  19:14:40


There are quite a lot of free Mooc's (Massive Online Open Course) available now.  Great stuff and it's FREE!!  Noting to lose and everything to gain.



I recommend the Jazz Appreciation course and the Jazz Improvisation with Gary Burton.  Both on the Coursera site, I believe.



coursera.org/



edx.org/



 



Edited by - fiddlenbanjo on 06/02/2015 19:15:31

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